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6 Potential Transportation Systems For The Future

6 Potential Transportation Systems For The Future

It is often said that the world has now become a “global village” due to enhanced transportation and communication. Communication technology has made interaction between distant people easy, whereas it is thanks to modern transportation methods that you can now easily travel from one corner of the world to the other corner within a matter of hours.

Primitive transportation systems included just a few animals and wheeled carts. As civilization advanced, we came up with many new vehicles, ranging from trains to motorcars to ships to airplanes; and still our quest for even faster and more reliable transport system continues. In this article, we will be looking at 6 potential transportation systems of the future.

1. Personal Air Vehicle

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    Generally known as flying cars, PAVs are an emerging aviation market which provide on-demand aviation services. The term ‘PAV’ was initiated by NASA in 2003 when it launched PAVSP (Personal Air Vehicle Sector Project), as part of the Aeronautics Vehicle Systems Program.

    As per NASA, any flying vehicle can be classified as a PAV if it has seat capacity of less than 5 passengers, a speed of 150-200 mph and a range of about 800 miles. Due to several ongoing research projects, a PAV challenge organized by NASA and funding from several organizations, such as the EU, there is great potential that PAVs will one day be deployed into the public market.

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    2. Jetpack

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      A jetpack is a device that is propelled by jets of emitted gases, which can propel the user into the air/space. The concept of the jetpack arose from science fiction and its history dates back to 1960. It has since been repeatedly featured in literature, movies, video games and research projects and has now become a reality.

      The common fuels for jetpacks are hydrogen peroxide, an oxygen-hydrocarbon mixture, or jet fuel, among others. However, there are many obstacles to the use of jetpacks for transport, like atmospheric friction and our planet’s gravity, low energy density of available fuels and short flight period due to the small size of fuel packs.

      The current prototypes of jetpacks have a small range and height, high fuel consumption and a maximum flight period of only about 10 minutes. Yet, one among the numerous ongoing research projects to enhance the performance of jetpacks might just bring us good news someday, which could make it possible to use them for things like airport transfer.

      3. Backpack Helicopter

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        A backpack helicopter is a device that consists of a motor-rotor system, can be worn on a person’s back like a backpack and uses driven-air current to propel the user into the air. The working mechanism of backpack helicopters is the same as in regular helicopters, except that the rotors in backpack helicopters are contra-rotating so as to reduce the turning motion and rotate at a fixed pitch for simplicity, unlike full-scale helicopters.

        They often use a safety harness with a strap to be placed between the legs to prevent the user from falling out of the harness. Some backpack helicopters also provide a seat for the pilot. Besides the portrayal of backpack helicopters in popular culture, many working models of backpack helicopters have already been developed. It might, however, take some time to prepare this transportation system to be launched on a large public scale.

        4. Hover Car

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          A hover car is a personal vehicle, pretty much like a car, but which is able to fly at a constant altitude of about a few meters. This new brand of car has been widely portrayed in science fiction and popular culture for a long time, but is now closer to being a reality.

          The theoretical mechanism of a hover car, as described in science fiction, is such that it uses some short-range anti-gravity phenomenon against frictional forces, which enables it to easily hover above the ground and travel at great speed. A hover car doesn’t produce dust cloud, unlike an air-cushion vehicle.

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          The closest existing counterparts of hover cars are hovercraft and hover trains. There have been numerous attempts to develop a real hover car since 1958, but so far a hovering altitude of only about few inches has been achieved. Researchers may be close to designing and deploying hover cars that can speed up to 1500 miles per hour in the near future.

          5. Slidewalk

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            Contrary to the regular trend of a moving vehicle/user on a stationary track, slidewalk is a conceptual transport system which consists of a moving track that can transport people and objects from one place to another.

            As with many other inventions, the idea of the slidewalk came from science fiction, and has been portrayed in many books, like H.G. Well’s “When the Sleeper Wakes,” Arthur C. Clark’s “The city and the stars” and even in the “The Jetsons” cartoon series.

            Theoretically, slidewalks are structurally strong enough to even support buildings and a large population of travelers, and have an average speed of about 37 miles per hour. Existing examples of transport system similar to slidewalk are conveyor belts, used to transport goods within a production factory, and the “people movers” in some large airports. These examples stand out as a hope that one day we can really bring slidewalks into practice.

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            6. Space Elevators

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              Space elevators are a proposed system that can be used for space transportation. Russian scientist Konstantin Tsiolkovsky first conceptualized space elevators back in the late 19th century.

              The idea is to anchor a tensile structure (preferably a cable), called a tether, to the planet’s surface, extend it vertically into space/the sky and add a counterweight to it, such that the center of mass for the overall system lies above the geostationary orbit.

              The interaction between outward centrifugal force and downward gravitational force causes the tether to be tense and remain stationary over a single position relative to the planet. Any object (called a climber) can climb up the tether by mechanical means, release the cargo (craft, satellite, etc.) into the geostationary orbit and descend when the job is done. It serves literally as an elevator up into space.

              The challenge is to find a cable material that is both strong and light, such as carbon nano-tubes (CNT). The first construction of boron nitride nanotubes and diamond nanothreads were great breakthroughs in 2014 and have multiplied the chances of the earth’s first space elevator being built.

              Featured photo credit: Wikipedia via upload.wikimedia.org

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              Last Updated on May 14, 2019

              8 Replacements for Google Notebook

              8 Replacements for Google Notebook

              Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

              1. Zoho Notebook
                If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
              2. Evernote
                The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
              3. Net Notes
                If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
              4. i-Lighter
                You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
              5. Clipmarks
                For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
              6. UberNote
                If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
              7. iLeonardo
                iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
              8. Zotero
                Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

              I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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              In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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