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Which Type Of Learner Are You? Find Out

Which Type Of Learner Are You? Find Out

The way people learn varies from person-to-person. Depending on individual biases, people will retain different levels of knowledge from certain courses. If a course is taught entirely through a lecture, not everyone will retain the same amount of information. The same can be said about a course that is visually-based, or has a section of only reading.

Most classes won’t teach all the work in just one style, so that different types of learning styles can be covered. This will help every person in the class reach an approximate level of retention. If one style of learning is left out, especially with classes that teach mostly theory, it’s hard to teach students who learn in different ways. Luckily, most people aren’t 100% one style of learner—they can learn in one style or more, but often have a dominant style of learning.

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Here are a few styles of learning. Read on to figure out which camp of learners you fall into.

You are a kinesthetic learner if:

Kinesthetic learners learn by doing. They know the theories, they can grasp certain things, but sometimes they just have to do things to really retain what is being taught. This is how most jobs train people, so if you’re a predominantly kinesthetic learner and haven’t really done well in school, that’s because most classes don’t have you do the things they teach. You can read about history but never participate in it. Science can be tricky to teach to kinesthetic learners as well—I could describe a molecule and show you a picture of it, but you can never really interact with it on an intimate level unless you also have an electron microscope and highly expensive equipment.

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You are an audio learner if:

This type of learner will be the one doing well on that pop quiz in class after the material was taught entirely through a long and drawn-out lecture. Lots of classes are mostly instruction, so you must be at least partly an audio learner to function in any fashion in the classroom. This is often the most-used type of teaching, and if your professor or teacher has a boring or hard-to-listen-to voice, you’re going to have a bad time.

You are a visual learner if:

These are the artists, the wanderers, and the day dreamers you see staring off into space or looking at the board during a lecture. These people need visualizations and diagrams for their learning. They prefer to read the bullet points during a lecture and would rather take notes to study from. They want you to demonstrate and show them how things should be done.

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You are learning disabled or an unmotivated learner if:

There should be a distinction between the two, and disabilities such as dyslexia should have an entire article representing them. Unmotivated learners sometimes switch between styles of learning and can become frustrated with which one may be dominant or easiest for them to learn with. Achievements can be difficult for both at first, but perseverance and a patient teacher that’s willing to try different styles should allow both to progress.

You might be a nerd if:

If you’ve made it this far in the article, you’re a nerd—I’m joking, it’s a short article. Overachieving learners can often be found with their noses deep inside a textbook. They are accelerated in their studies and can display all types of learning styles, but would rather remain quiet with the book. They may be reading the entire thing, including the material that won’t be taught in the class, but they could also be listening. Please let the overachiever borrow your pencil or pen, because they can take notes too—that they’ll be happy to share if you’re nice enough.

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Featured photo credit: liquene/imcreator via imcreator.com

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

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1. Listen

Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

“Why do you want to do that?”

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“What makes you so excited about it?”

“How long has that been your dream?”

You need this information the help you with the following steps.

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3. Encourage

This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

5. Dream

This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

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6. Ask How You Can Help

Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

7. Follow Up

Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

Final Thoughts

By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

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Featured photo credit: Thought Catalog via unsplash.com

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