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Science Reveals The Truth Behind 15 Common Food Myths

Science Reveals The Truth Behind 15 Common Food Myths

Here’s the thing about food. It’s essential, not magic.

There is no one food that’s going to make you healthier, and there is no one food that causes you to be less healthy.

Here is the science behind some of the most common food myths out there on the internet.

Myth: Microwaves zap the nutrients out of your food

You might be surprised to learn that microwaving your food is one of the best cooking methods when it comes to preserving nutrients. It just goes to show you cannot trust that everyone making claims on the internet has the scientific research to back them up.

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Myth: Eggs are bad for your heart

Eggs aren’t as harmful to our cholesterol levels as we have come to believe. Actually, when you eat food containing cholesterol, your body compensates by making less cholesterol. Experts say if you eat an egg or two every day, it’s not going to hurt you.

Myth: Carbs make you fat

People are obsessed with low-carb diets because they believe eating carbs makes you fat. Carbohydrates are a form of energy and just another nutrient your body converts to glucose when you eat it. If you’re worried about eating too much sugar, good luck: in the end, everything you eat turns into sugar in a form your body uses to perform its daily functions.

Myth: Radiation from microwaves puts dangerous compounds in your food

Seriously, what does the internet have against microwaves? The short rebuttal: no. The kind of radiation given off by microwaves is not the kind of radiation that will harm you. And as mentioned above, microwaving your food is actually the best thing you can do for its nutritional value.

Myth: You can cleanse toxins from your body

Your body, to keep itself alive, has natural processes that remove toxins from your body as needed. You don’t need to stop eating a certain kind of food or drink a lot of water to make that happen. Your biology has you covered. Really. You cannot flush chemicals out of you. Everything is chemicals.

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Myth: Vitamin C prevents colds

Research has yet to point to any proof that consuming vitamin C will keep you from getting a cold. It will probably make the cold you already have not last quite as long, but it’s not going to keep you from getting one. Washing your hands probably will, though.

Myth: A gluten-free diet is good for you even when you don’t need it

Those who need to be on gluten-free diets have something called Celiac disease, which means they are legitimately allergic to gluten (sort of). If you don’t have Celiac disease and you think going gluten-free is a good idea, think again: it can actually really hurt you.

Myth: Eating fat makes you fat

Actually, eating fat gives you energy, just like any other major nutrient out there. You might start to have a problem if you’re overeating fatty foods (or any kind of food for that matter), but cutting out fat from your diet won’t make you lose weight.

Myth: Nuts are bad for you

Nuts contain protein, which is essential for a healthy diet. The reason you don’t need to worry about nuts is that they contain more beneficial nutrients than ones you need to watch more closely. Too much of anything isn’t good for you. Take a handful and you’ll be fine. Don’t eat the whole container at once.

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Myth: If it’s labeled “natural,” it’s healthy

The word “natural” on a food label does not say anything about how healthy a food is. Foods that are labeled as natural go through minimal amounts of processing, which means that even if they don’t contain any fake ingredients or colors, it still goes through processing. And the USDA isn’t too specific about what that means. Organic is your healthier option here.

Myth: You need to drink exactly eight glasses of water every day

How much water you need to drink every day actually depends on a lot of different factors. There is no magic amount of water that’s going to cure all your diseases or make you lose weight. You need to listen to your body. When you’re thirsty, drink some water. When you’re not thirsty anymore, don’t drink any more water. It’s that simple.

Myth: Never eat after 7 p.m.

Time of day has nothing to do with how your body absorbs and uses nutrients. Eating certain foods later in the day might make it harder for some people to fall asleep or get a good night’s rest, but the calories you dump into your body in the morning are the exact same calories you dump into it at night.

Myth: Celery has “negative” calories

Celery has fewer than 10 calories per serving, which does make them great choices for healthy snacks (especially if you pair them with your favorite dip or spread). They are extremely low in calories, but you don’t burn calories by eating a stick of celery.

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Myth: Raw vegetables are more nutritious than cooked vegetables

In reality, certain vegetables have more of certain kinds of nutrients when their cooked as opposed to when you eat them raw. It all depends on how you cook them. Methods like boiling do cause vegetables to lose some of their water-soluble vitamins, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they are any less nutritious overall.

Myth: Margarine is healthier than butter

When comparing margarine and butter, margarine is usually considered healthier because it is made from vegetable oils. Most margarine still contains trans fat, though, which actually lowers the good kind of cholesterol in your body. Your best bet would be to limit whichever spread you choose.

If you’re ever unsure of whether something related to food is true or not, look up sources that are backed by scientific evidence, or information that comes from professional organizations. Hate to break it to you, but your favorite food blogger, unless she’s a licensed nutrition professional, is probably wrong.

Featured photo credit: Michael Stern via flickr.com

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Last Updated on July 10, 2020

How to Take Control of Your Life with Better Boundaries

How to Take Control of Your Life with Better Boundaries

We all have them—those hurtful, frustrating, offensive, manipulative people in our lives. No matter how hard we try to surround ourselves with positive and kind people, there will always be those who will disrespect, insult, berate, and misuse you if we allow them to.

We may, for a variety of reasons, not be able to avoid them, but we can determine how we interact with them and how we allow them to interact with us.

So, how to take control of your life and stop being pushed around?

Learning to set clear firm boundaries with the people in our lives at work and in our personal lives is the best way to protect ourselves from the negative effects of this kind of behavior.

What Boundaries Are (And What They’re Not)

Boundaries are limits

—they are not threats or ultimatums. Boundaries inform or teach. They are not a form of punishment.

Boundaries are firm lines—determined by you—which cannot be crossed by those around you. They are guidelines for how you will allow others to treat you and what kind of behaviors you will expect.

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Healthy personal boundaries help protect you from physical or emotional pain. You may also need to set firm boundaries at work to ensure you and your time are not disrespected. Don’t allow others to take advantage of your kindness and generosity.

Clear boundaries communicate to others that you demand respect and consideration—that you are willing to stand up for yourself and that you will not be a doormat for anyone. They are a “no trespassing” sign that makes it very clear when a line has been crossed and that there will be consequences for doing so.

Boundaries are not set with the intention of changing other people. They may change how people interact with you, but they are more about enforcing your needs than attempting to change the general behavior and attitude of others.

How to Establish Boundaries and Take Control of Your Life

Here are some ways that you can establish boundaries and take control of your life.

1. Self-Awareness Comes First

Before you can establish boundaries with others, you first need to understand what your needs are.

You are entitled to respect. You have the right to protect yourself from inappropriate or offensive behavior. Setting boundaries is a way of honoring your needs.

To set appropriate boundaries, you need to be clear about what healthy behaviors look like—what healthy relationships look like.

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You first have to become more aware of your feelings and honest with yourself about your expectations and what you feel is appropriate behavior:

  • Where do you need to establish better boundaries?
  • When do you feel disrespected?
  • When do you feel violated, frustrated, or angered by the behavior of others?
  • In what situations do you feel you are being mistreated or taken advantage of?
  • When do you want to be alone?
  • How much space do you need?

You need to honor your own needs and boundaries before you can expect others to honor them. This allows you to take control of your life.

2. Clear Communication Is Essential

Inform others clearly and directly what your expectations are. It is essential to have clear communication if you want others to respect your boundaries. Explain in an honest and respectful tone what you find offensive or unacceptable.

Many people simply aren’t aware that they are behaving inappropriately. They may never have been taught proper manners or consideration for others.

3. Be Specific but Don’t Blame

Taking a blaming or punishing attitude automatically puts people on the defensive. People will not listen when they feel attacked. It’s part of human nature.

That said, you do not need to overexplain or defend yourself. Boundaries are not open to compromise.

Sample language:

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  • “You may not…yell or raise your voice to me…”
  • “I need…to be treated with respect…”
  • “It’s not okay when…you take things from my desk without asking…”
  • “I won’t…do your work…cover for you anymore…”
  • “It’s not acceptable when…you ridicule or insult me…”
  • “I am uncomfortable when…you use offensive language”
  • “I will no longer be able to…lend you money…”

Being able to communicate these without sounding accusatory is essential if you want others to respect your boundaries so you can take control of your life.

4. Consequences Are Often Necessary

Determine what the appropriate consequences will be when boundaries are crossed. If it’s appropriate, be clear about those consequences upfront when communicating those boundaries to others.

Follow through. People won’t respect your boundaries if you don’t enforce them.

Standing our ground and forcing consequences doesn’t come easily to us. We want to be nice. We want people to like us, but we shouldn’t have to trade our self-respect to gain friends or to achieve success.

We may be tempted to let minor disrespect slide to avoid conflict, but as the familiar saying goes, “if you give people an inch, they’ll take a mile.”

It’s much easier to address offensive or inappropriate behavior now than to wait until that behavior has gotten completely out of hand.

It’s also important to remember that positive reinforcement is even more powerful than negative consequences. When people do alter the way they treat you, acknowledge it. Let people know that you notice and appreciate their efforts.

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Final Thoughts

Respect is always a valid reason for setting a boundary. Don’t defend yourself or your needs. Boundaries are often necessary to protect your time, your space, and your feelings. And these are essential if you want to take control of your life.

Start with the easiest boundaries first. Setting boundaries is a skill that needs to be practiced. Enlist support from others if necessary. Inform people immediately when they have crossed the line.

Don’t wait. Communicate politely and directly. Be clear about the consequences and follow them through.

The better you become at setting your own boundaries, the better you become at recognizing and respecting the boundaries of others.

Remember that establishing boundaries is your right. You are entitled to respect. You can’t control how other people behave, but you do have control over the way you allow people to treat you.

Learning to set boundaries is not always easy, but with time, it will become more comfortable. You may eventually find that boundaries become automatic and you no longer need to consciously set them.

They will simply become a natural extension of your self-respect.

Featured photo credit: Thomas Kelley via unsplash.com

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