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Why No One Should Overlook Kale

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Why No One Should Overlook Kale

Kale might seem like the ugly step-sister of the crucifers — especially with superstars like broccoli and cauliflower in the family!  But this leafy green is a veritable powerhouse of nutrients and health benefits that make it a true superfood.

For sure, you should make sure you’re not overlooking this great vegetable. Whenever you eat kale…

You are Getting an Incredible Variety of Vitamins and Minerals

Kale, according to the USDA, is incredibly nutrient-dense. Just one cup of this amazing leafy green, and you will be getting 24 calories, 1 gram of protein, 1 gram of carbohydrates and a half-gram of fiber. But now check out what you’ll be packing away in regards to vitamins and minerals:

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  • Calcium, 24 mg
  • Potassium, 79 mg
  • Phosphorous, 15 mg
  • Vitamin C, 19 mg
  • Folate, 23 mg
  • Vitamin K, 1598 IU

In short, high-quality foods like kale are a great way to fill some of the “nutrient gaps” that are especially common in the American diet — which relies so much on prepackaged foods.

You are also Getting a Boatload of Antioxidants

It’s not just a ton of vitamins and minerals you’re getting. Kale also provides powerful antioxidants that work in many ways to improve your general health. Kale is rich in beta-carotene and Vitamin C (which also helps build collagen for healthy joints and beautiful, young-looking skin) as well as flavonoids like quercetin, which have been shown to decrease blood pressure, fight off viral infections and even help with depression.

Another important antioxidant to note is lutein, which can improve the health of your eyes and help reduce the risk of serious eye diseases like macular degeneration, a leading cause of blindness.

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In short, eating kale on a regular basis is a great way to load up on disease-fighting antioxidants.

You Are Improving Your Cholesterol Levels

High cholesterol is a real problem in America and is a major risk factor for both heart and attacks and strokes. But fortunately, apart from medication, there are natural ways to get cholesterol down to a healthy level. One of those ways is a diet rich in fruits and veggies, especially veggies like kale. Kale contains compounds that actually prevent cholesterol from being absorbed into the body — and this can help prevent it from building up in arteries and causing problems later on.

One study found that men with high cholesterol levels who consumed kale juice daily for 12 weeks were able to raise their good cholesterol up by 27% while at the same time lowering bad cholesterol by 11%, which meant a significant improvement in heart health!

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You are Reducing Cancer Risk, Too

Most people worry about cancer — and with good reason, as it remains the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. That’s the bad news.

The good news? It is possible to reduce the risk of many forms of cancer through lifestyle changes — including the diet. Kale, like cabbage and broccoli, is particularly good at this. For one thing, it contains sulforophane, which has been shown to fight against the formation of cancer cells.  It also contains indole-3-carbinol, better known as 1-3-C, which has gotten a lot of attention lately because of its ability to help treat breast cancer.

So for one little cup of kale, you are getting a whole wealth of health benefits. If you eat it regularly, you can improve your heart health, reduce cancer risk and load up on the vitamins and minerals your body needs for general health. It is also incredibly easy to add to your diet; kale goes well in smoothies (seriously), in salads, and even in casseroles and pasta or rice dishes.

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So, try some awesome kale recipes today and start giving your body some serious TLC!

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Brian Wu

Health Writer, Author

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Last Updated on January 27, 2022

5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

“Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

Food is a universal necessity.

It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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