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How To Know Whether A Viral Story Is Real Or Not

How To Know Whether A Viral Story Is Real Or Not

In the digital age, news no longer requires days or weeks to be passed around. A breaking story can be broadcast to the entire world in a few short hours. Gone are the days of painfully long waiting times for a letter to be delivered or to arrive. Our global microwave culture can witness mind-bending news reports or accomplishments in what feels like no time at all.

With the ability to share information and stories at the speed of lightning has come a slew of false information. There seems to be a new viral story popping up every week, which begs the question – “Did this viral story actually take place?” Fortunately, the Web hosts a variety of sites and resources that are useful in hunting down authentic information. Check out our list below for a digital truth-testing toolbox.

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Examine With FotoForensics

This website provides an upload feature to scan a picture for quality disparities. The site examines your photo or URL to detect any suspicious graphic elements. FotoForensics uses a procedure called error level analysis (ELA), highlights potential issues with the picture and then provides sharing options.

Check Out Google’s Reverse Image Search

If doubting a photo is real at all, or that it came from a completely different source, hop on over to Google and check the image out. Your result should turn up a year the picture was taken and likely the location.

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Upload And Assess With TinEye

This site is another popular and quickly-growing resource for reverse image searching. The site has already indexed over 13 billion images and this is not slowing down any time soon.

Look Deeper With Jeffrey Friedl’s Image Viewer

The exchangeable image file (EXIF) on pictures and video is recorded during the creation of a file. To fully determine when, where and in what format a piece of media was created, you’ll need to access the EXIF. This can be easily done on Friedl’s site.

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Retrieve Info With WolframAlpha

This site is a mega database of information, and especially useful when it comes to determining the weather on a certain day. You can plug in the info you’re looking for along with the date, and WolframAlpha will return to you an impressively comprehensive result. This resource comes in handy if you see a post or picture about a natural disaster or weather incident that seems highly unlikely.

Verify With YouTube DataViewer

YouTube’s DataViewer is, surprisingly, not readily accessible through YouTube. Rather, it was first provided through the non-profit Amnesty International, an organization that works to uphold human rights across the globe and validate those who have been wronged. Their convenient web tool allows you to search for fraudulent uploads and “scrapes” – generally, any kind of video that does not legitimately have the origin or source it claims to have.

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Consult Various Online Maps

Last but far from least, some of the primary online maps such as Google Earth, Wikimapia and Google Street View are all highly reliable sources for map info. Wikimapia is essentially the crowdsourced version of Google Maps, but has additional resources. Google Earth and Street View are also always being updated, and provide exhaustive details and options for customizing a search. There’s little these three maps alone cannot verify, if anything.

Viral videos and pictures become viral for a reason – they tap into sensationalism in some fashion, and people’s emotions are so moved that they feel an urge to spread the word. Anger, shock, sadness, elation and outrage can all push someone over the brink, but the vast majority of people will not hold themselves back long enough to examine a viral story further. Now, thanks to these web tools, you have rapid and trustworthy methods for checking out what’s real, and what’s rubbish.

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Brad Johnson

Top 5 Kindle Author | Author of 10 Books

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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