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Overthinking Worriers Are Probably Creative Geniuses, Research Finds

Overthinking Worriers Are Probably Creative Geniuses, Research Finds

People have a tendency to put labels on others, and this is particularly common in modern society. You have your introverts (the socially anxious), extroverts (the social butterflies), ambiverts (the in-betweeners), worriers, and so on. So what about the anxious and overthinking worriers?

A recent study has shown that those who possess these traits may actually have an incredibly developed and creative mind to thank for their worrying ways.

The good people at King’s College, London, have reportedly made a connection between an overblown sense of anxiety and a stronger imagination.

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As Dr. Adam Perkins, an expert in the Neurobiology of Personality, so eloquently put:

“It occurred to me that if you happen to have a preponderance of negatively hued self-generated thoughts, due to high levels of spontaneous activity in the parts of the medial prefrontal cortex that govern conscious perception of threat and you also have a tendency to switch to panic sooner than average people, due to possessing especially high reactivity in the basolateral nuclei of the amygdale, then that means you can experience intense negative emotions even when there’s no threat present. This could mean that for specific neural reasons, high scorers on neuroticism have a highly active imagination, which acts as a built-in threat generator.”

So, what does all of this mean, exactly?

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Worrying is the mother of ingenuity

You can think about it like this: most technological breakthroughs came about because we were worried we’d starve, worried that the other tribe would conquer us and steal our things, worried that the Gods would be angered by our actions and so on. The main difference between overthinkers and the rest of the population – is imagination. Somewhere between fantasy and the reality of the present moment lies the road to self-preservation and progress.

A few examples: Most people’s idea of home safety ends with locking the front door and closing the ground floor windows. Those who are a bit more concerned will have a baseball bat or golf club near the door, or a gun tucked away somewhere secure. However, a worrier will not only be concerned about external threats, but will also envision scenarios like a child finding the gun and getting hurt or a burglar stealing it while no one is home, which leads him to seek out ingenious ways of keeping the weapon safe and out of the wrong hands (e.g., putting it behind a biometric lock or creating hidden compartments).

There might not be a great danger now, but their imagination allows them to think of all possible scenarios and prepare for them accordingly.

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A vivid imagination helped us prevail against nature and beast, and worriers have it in spades

Modern worriers find creative ways of dealing with small everyday problems, work-related tasks, and improving their safety. In the old days, our ancestors developed this incredibly vivid imagination as a self-preservation mechanism. During the hottest month of the year, when everything in nature was plentiful, ancient man was able to feed freely. But these people could imagine the cold months that awaited just around the corner, when food would be scarce and the need for shelter and warmth increased.

The early human worriers would hunt down much more than they could immediately consume, and then find ways of preserving meat and plants so that they could last the winter. Worrying about such things served as a worst case scenario safety mechanism, and to envision such scenarios you needed to be incredibly creative.

A lot of world-famous problem-solvers and artists were indeed worriers and overthinkers

Our scientist friend, Dr Adam Perkins, goes on to state:

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“Cheerful, happy-go-lucky people by definition do not brood about problems and so must be at a disadvantage when problem-solving compared to a more neurotic person. We have a useful sanity check for our theory because it is easy to observe that many geniuses seem to have a brooding, unhappy tendency that hints they are fairly high on the neuroticism spectrum. For example, think of the life stories of Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin, Vincent Van Gogh, Kurt Cobain, etc. Perhaps the link between creativity and neuroticism was summed up most succinctly of all by John Lennon when he said: ‘Genius is pain.’”

There are a lot of incredibly creative scientists and artists on that list, and probably a whole lot more than Dr Perkins could name off the top of his head. If you have a tendency to worry about things to the point of being neurotic, there is a good chance you are a creative genius yourself.

Hey, it doesn’t cost you anything test the hypothesis: Try honing those powers of imagination and creative problem-solving, and see exactly where it takes you.

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Last Updated on August 16, 2018

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

The ability to take risks by stepping outside your comfort zone is the primary way by which we grow. But we are often afraid to take that first step.

In truth, comfort zones are not really about comfort, they are about fear. Break the chains of fear to get outside. Once you do, you will learn to enjoy the process of taking risks and growing in the process.

Here are 10 ways to help you step out of your comfort zone and get closer to success:

1. Become aware of what’s outside of your comfort zone

What are the things that you believe are worth doing but are afraid of doing yourself because of the potential for disappointment or failure?

Draw a circle and write those things down outside the circle. This process will not only allow you to clearly identify your discomforts, but your comforts. Write identified comforts inside the circle.

2. Become clear about what you are aiming to overcome

Take the list of discomforts and go deeper. Remember, the primary emotion you are trying to overcome is fear.

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How does this fear apply uniquely to each situation? Be very specific.

Are you afraid of walking up to people and introducing yourself in social situations? Why? Is it because you are insecure about the sound of your voice? Are you insecure about your looks?

Or, are you afraid of being ignored?

3. Get comfortable with discomfort

One way to get outside of your comfort zone is to literally expand it. Make it a goal to avoid running away from discomfort.

Let’s stay with the theme of meeting people in social settings. If you start feeling a little panicked when talking to someone you’ve just met, try to stay with it a little longer than you normally would before retreating to comfort. If you stay long enough and practice often enough, it will start to become less uncomfortable.

4. See failure as a teacher

Many of us are so afraid of failure that we would rather do nothing than take a shot at our dreams.

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Begin to treat failure as a teacher. What did you learn from the experience? How can you take that lesson to your next adventure to increase your chance of success?

Many highly successful people failed plenty of times before they succeeded. Here’re some examples:

10 Famous Failures to Success Stories That Will Inspire You to Carry On

5. Take baby steps

Don’t try to jump outside your comfort zone, you will likely become overwhelmed and jump right back in.

Take small steps toward the fear you are trying to overcome. If you want to do public speaking, start by taking every opportunity to speak to small groups of people. You can even practice with family and friends.

Take a look at this article on how you can start taking baby steps:

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The Number One Secret to Life Success: Baby Steps

6. Hang out with risk takers

There is no substitute for this step. If you want to become better at something, you must start hanging out with the people who are doing what you want to do and start emulating them. (Here’re 8 Reasons Why Risk Takers Are More Likely To Be Successful).

Almost inevitably, their influence will start have an effect on your behavior.

7. Be honest with yourself when you are trying to make excuses

Don’t say “Oh, I just don’t have the time for this right now.” Instead, be honest and say “I am afraid to do this.”

Don’t make excuses, just be honest. You will be in a better place to confront what is truly bothering you and increase your chance of moving forward.

8. Identify how stepping out will benefit you

What will the ability to engage in public speaking do for your personal and professional growth? Keep these potential benefits in mind as motivations to push through fear.

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9. Don’t take yourself too seriously

Learn to laugh at yourself when you make mistakes. Risk taking will inevitably involve failure and setbacks that will sometimes make you look foolish to others. Be happy to roll with the punches when others poke fun.

If you aren’t convinced yet, check out these 6 Reasons Not to Take Life So Seriously.

10. Focus on the fun

Enjoy the process of stepping outside your safe boundaries. Enjoy the fun of discovering things about yourself that you may not have been aware of previously.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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