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Last Updated on January 6, 2020

16 Timeless Quotes About the Power of Learning

16 Timeless Quotes About the Power of Learning

As humans, we have few or no true instincts. Everything we do, we have learned to do, from walking to programming complex computer systems. Philosophers, educators, and many others have been talking about the nature of learning since the earliest days of recorded history, and probably even before that.

The following quotes, from a wide variety of times, explore different aspects related to learning.

Learning Quotes - 16 of 16

    Each of us have our own gifts, but everyone has the gift of a capacity to learn. Obviously, each man or woman’s level of this gift is different, but it is always there. What is important, and what Brian Herbert recognizes, is that you should make the most of your gift by choosing to exercise and build on your skill for learning.

    Learning Quotes - 13 of 16

      Benjamin Franklin was one of the wisest men in American history, perhaps in world history. Refusing to make the choice to learn, Franklin points out, is a serious shame. Why would you disregard your gift of the capacity for learning? Even if you do not have the same capability for learning as someone like Franklin or Einstein, it is important to make the most of the ability you do have.

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      Learning Quotes - 11 of 16

        da Vinci put this very well. Learning promotes understanding, and understanding something brings more satisfaction and joy than almost anything else, and in a very noble way. Strive to always learn more and understand more.

        Learning Quotes - 12 of 16

          If you consider yourself too smart to keep learning, you’re dead wrong! As Herold points out, the geniuses of the world have more to learn, if they are going to use their gift of a great capacity for learning to its fullest potential. This is why it’s important to never stop learning.

          Learning Quotes - 1 of 16

            We turn again to Benjamin Franklin, and his thoughts on how best to learn. While everyone learns differently, it is very common for interaction to promote the best type of learning. It’s important to listen to our teachers, but we should get involved to truly learn.

            Learning Quotes - 3 of 16

              Leonardo da Vinci was a great mind, and his contributions to society were just as great. Many people may try to avoid learning because they are lazy and don’t want to put forth the effort. While you can certain get mentally exhausted, it is not proper learning that exhausts your mind. Learning actually stimulates your mind, if it’s done properly.

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              Learning Quotes - 4 of 16

                How do you properly learn? Through repetition, as founder of Declara, Ramona Pierson, learned when she was learning to walk and talk again after a tragic accident. Quite often, repeating something is the best way to learn it, so don’t be afraid of a little redundancy when learning.

                Learning Quotes - 5 of 16

                  Confucius was very wise, and his contributions to learning are almost endless. This timeless quote makes it clear that learning and thinking to hand in hand, and that failing to learn can be extremely dangerous.

                  Learning Quotes - 6 of 16

                    Yes, you are taught many things in school, but how many of them did you truly learn? How much do you remember today? What you remember today of what you learned in school is true education and learning, because it has stuck with you throughout the years.

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                    Learning Quotes - 7 of 16

                      Bruce Lee was more than just a skilled martial artist, he was also an accomplished learner and teacher, as well as a philosopher. It is absolutely true that asking questions, no matter how foolish they may seem, does much more to promote learning than reciting facts and figures without stopping to listen and think about what needs to be learned.

                      Learning Quotes - 14 of 16

                        Euripides was one of the wisest philosophers and playrights of the classic Athens age. On par with Socrates, Euripides points out that you should ask questions and listen to the answers, rather than trying to show off what you know.

                        Learning Quotes - 8 of 16

                          Once you already know how to do something, continuing to do it is simply pointless repetition. Keep learning by finding new things to do, or new ways to do the old things. If you cannot do something, try to do it and learn how!

                          Learning Quotes - 9 of 16

                            Lou Holtz stresses what Euripides told us: we learn by asking questions and listening to the answers. Sure, it’s important to help others learn by answering their questions, but it is even more important to continue your own learning by asking questions and then listening carefully.

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                            Learning Quotes - 10 of 16

                              How many people learned to walk by following a how-to guide? Chances are, not many, because that’s not a way to learn. To learn is to do, and to fail. From our mistakes come learning.

                              Learning Quotes - 2 of 16

                                I’ve said this many times, and I’ll say it again. Never stop learning. What Gandhi is saying here is that you should learn as if the stuff you’re learning will be crucial to you even hundreds of years from now, as if you were going to live forever.

                                Learning Quotes - 15 of 16

                                  To end out this article, we’ll turn to an unlikely source: Jack Nicholson. He’s absolutely right, though, that someone who stops learning might as well be dead, because they are stagnant intellectually. Always be learning, and always keep stretching your intellect.

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                                  Featured photo credit: Drew Beamer via unsplash.com

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                                  Last Updated on March 25, 2020

                                  How to Learn Quickly And Master Any Skill You Want

                                  How to Learn Quickly And Master Any Skill You Want

                                  Have you ever heard of the idiom ‘practice makes perfect’? I’m pretty sure someone would have said that to you at least once in your life! It’s a common saying, often used to encourage someone when they’re learning or doing something that is new to them.

                                  They may need many tries before succeeding and getting it right. It’s like learning to ride a bicycle, learning how to drive, taking up a second language, or cooking for the first time. It’s rare for anyone to ace it on their first try.

                                  Whenever you want to start learning something new, I’m sure you’re always hoping to get good at it quickly. But the reality is, that sometimes it does take days, months or even years before you can confidently master a skill.

                                  That’s simply how learning works. You try, you gain experience, you learn from it, and you try again. And each time, you’re improving and making progress. Every time you repeat this learning process, you’re going through something called a Feedback Loop. You’ll have to go through multiple feedback loops before confidently executing the skill.

                                  What separates a fast learner from a slower learner is not some innate, natural talent. Instead, it’s because the fast learner understands how they learn, and has a systematic way to apply it all the time to learn a variety of things. They know how to effectively use their Feedback Loop to speed up the learning process.

                                  So the good news for you, is that if you’re currently wanting to learn a new skill as quickly as possible, then you just need to learn how to create an effective Feedback Loop.

                                  What is a Feedback Loop?

                                  When we talk about feedback, it simple means getting information about how well you’re performing each time you make an attempt at practicing or applying a skill. Feedback is what tells you what went wrong, or what went right.

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                                  A Feedback Loop is made up of 3 stages:

                                  1. Practice / Apply – This is the stage where you put what you want to learn into action.
                                  2. Measure – This is the stage where you’re acquiring information about your performance. This is also the stage that is most ignored… or done ineffectively.
                                  3. Learn – This is the stage where you analyze how well you performed, and make adjustments to improve and practice/apply again.

                                  It’s important to recognize these 3 stages and put them into place each time you practice a new skill.

                                  Many people only have Stage 1 completed, and a very unclear or fuzzy process for Stage 2, which leads to poor results in Stage 3.

                                  A good, smooth cycle will help you continuously make improvements with each loop, creating steady progress and upgrading your understanding of the skill.

                                  How to Have an Effective Feedback Loop

                                  To make sure your Feedback Loop is effective, you will have to look at 3 key factors: Consistency, Speed, and Accuracy.

                                  1. Be Consistent

                                  Being consistent means having a regular way to get the same quality of feedback. You need to be able to compare every practice or learning experience in order to measure, learn and make adjustments. If your feedback is not consistent, then you’re going to have a hard time knowing what went wrong or what went right.

                                  For example, say you’re learning to play the guitar. If you play a different song every time you practice, you’re going to get very inconsistent feedback. Because the difficulty, rhythm, and pace of every song is different, you won’t have a reliable way to compare how well you played the current song versus the last. So, the best way to learn would be to play the same song over and over again until you get to a certain proficiency.

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                                  Seems obvious in this case, but it’s just an example. A lot of times learning is hard because we don’t focus on keeping with a consistent environment or actions.

                                  2. Be Quick

                                  Let’s move on to the second factor: speed. Having speedy or fast feedback is important because the longer it takes to get feedback, the longer it will take to improve on the skill. That’s why some people spend a tremendous amount of time practicing, but make very slow progress.

                                  On the other hand, the best forms of feedback are almost instantaneous. The shorter the time it takes for one Feedback Loop to complete, the better. This is because you’ll have more attempts, which means more improvements within the same timespan.

                                  So, the key to getting fast feedback is to take the skill or knowledge and break it down. Try to breakdown the skill into different components. They could be broken down into steps, subskills or processes, or even by difficulty.

                                  For example, if the skill you want to learn involves a sequence (ie: there is a step by step process), you can break your learning down by each step. Create a Feedback Loop for each step individually instead of the whole process. Isolate the processes into different parts that you can focus and work on individually.

                                  Let’s say you’re learning to cook. You can break this skill into steps, such as finding fresh and suitable ingredients, preparing and handling the ingredients, preparing condiments and sauces, serving and plating, etc.

                                  Or let’s say you’d like to learn how to play soccer. You can identify the sub-skills that make up the larger learning techniques to playing soccer, and create feedback loops for each of them individually. So you could start by learning how to dribble the ball, followed by passing, and then shooting.

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                                  The third and final factor to an effective Feedback Loop, is Accuracy. This means having feedback that actually reflects your performance accurately. Since you’re relying on feedback to tell you what and where to improve on the next time, this is very important. This is why measuring feedback is a key skill to have for an effective Feedback Loop.

                                  3. Be Accurate

                                  Obtaining accuracy in feedback becomes a common weak point for many learners, because it’s not always easy to define what “accuracy” means.

                                  To get accurate feedback, we have to have a way of measuring it. The reason why we sometimes get poor feedback is because we’re trying to measure our progress without quantifying our performance. Or, we’re using the wrong metrics to quantify the feedback. Worse yet, it might just be that you were never measuring or recording your performance at all! Can you recall yourself being in a similar situation?

                                  In order to find areas for improvement, you have to be able to compare your current performance with your previous performance. This is so that you have a baseline, or something to measure up against, to look for room for improvements.

                                  Quantifying is a way to accurately measure your performance. Quantifying something means attaching a number to it. This helps to give objectivity and consistency when comparing two things. Quantifying feedback can give you constructive information that will help you improve during each cycle of the feedback loop.

                                  Let’s say you’re practicing how to dribble a basketball. The first time you dribble, your coach tells you you’re doing a good job. The second time round, you get better and your coach affirms you by saying you’ve done a great job! Sure, your dribbling skill has improved–you know it, your coach knows it, but by how much? And how can you further improve your dribbling skills? A good job versus a great job doesn’t indicate how well you’ve performed, and how much better you can perform.

                                  But, now in the second scenario, if you manage to dribble the basketball up and down the court 4 times continuously without letting the ball slip, your coach tells you you’ve done a good job. In the second round, your coach now tells you to dribble the basketball up and down the court 8 times continuously without letting the ball slip. You managed to do that and your coach tells you great job! You can now quantify your improvement by the number of times you were able to dribble the basketball across the court.

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                                  With a quantity attached to your performance, you’re now able to push yourself further by learning to dribble 16 times or more across the basketball court. You can even add in new obstacles like having to dribble across the court with an opponent trying to snatch your basketball. If you’re successful, you can try dribbling across the court with 2 opponents snatching your basketball, so on and so forth. You’re now able to easily quantify your improvement.

                                  Continuously Improve Your Feedback Loop!

                                  So now that you’re familiar with the Feedback Loop, are you ready to put it into practice? What’s a new skill that you’d like to start on?

                                  Try implementing every stage of the Feedback Loop when learning this new skill and see for yourself, whether your learning improves at a quicker rate.

                                  It is essential to continuously improve your Feedback Loop in order to keep up your momentum, and avoid running into the law of diminishing returns. Improving your Feedback Loop means knowing what to measure next, and what questions to ask, to find out.

                                  In fact, the technique you’ve learned from this article is only part of our Learning Course. If you’d like to discover more gems that will help you speed up your learning and push yourself towards the goals that you’ve been striving for, check out our Learn Anything Fast Course.

                                  Or you can find out more learning tips in these articles:

                                  Featured photo credit: Adeolu Eletu via unsplash.com

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