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7 Ways To Avoid Cyberbullying

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7 Ways To Avoid Cyberbullying

Have you noticed your child being too private about his/her online activity? This could be one of the fist signs you child is being cyberbullied.

Cyberbullying is a rapidly growing issue, being among one of the dangerous online issues, it has became one of the top suicide factors for teens.

Online bullying is pretty much the same as traditional bullying, except cyberbullying happens with the help of modern technologies like computers and smartphones. According to the latest statistics kids spend around 4 hours a day online, with 80% of the time via smartphones, making them one of the most common mediums for cyberbullying.

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Children aged 7-17 harass and torment each other online, using social media, IM chats and traditional texting. Some of the most frightening statistics on cyberbullying are included below:

• More than 45% of children admit to be bullied online
• 70% admit to witness someone else being bullied but were too scared to do anything
• 93% of cyberbullying attacks are being held via commenting or chatting in social media chats like Facebook or Instagram
• Online bullying victims are 3 to 9 times more likely to commit suicide
• Only 1 out 10 online victims will report their parents or teachers

The problem of cyberbullying was first raised in 2012, after the death of Amanda Todd who was severely cyberbullied. McAfee chief officer reported in her interview that 1 in 10 kids have been cyberbullied without their parents knowing.

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is your kid being cyberbullied

    7 Ways You Can Prevent Cyberbullying:

    Talk.

    It is no secret that the key to understanding children is very often a simple conversation. Ask your kid/student what online bullying is, does he/she know anyone who is being bullied and so on. This is a famous psychological trick when a child refers to “a friend” when talking about his/her own problems.

    Monitor online activity.

    While you can trust your child, you cannot trust all of the Internet’s users. Monitoring online activity is a necessary precaution rule for both parents and teachers. The best smartphone monitoring is presented with Pumpic.com a parental control app, which allows you to monitor social media, IM chats, all calls and text messages and even track real-time location of your child, using GPS navigator. As for PC, the best known app is sociallyactive.com, a PC monitoring app that allows you to view browser behavior and block inappropriate websites.

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    Engage youth and parents.

    You can start cyberbullying awareness by creating a club or community against cyberbullying. Establish a school online safety community where kids can discuss their problems and report online attacks. Kids need to know that there is help and they are not alone in this fight.

    Create a positive climate.

    Unlike parents, schools can do a lot to prevent cyberbullying. Teachers can participate in anti-cyberbullying community, create weekly meetings and even send e-newsletters. Kids can be mixed in groups and given mutual tasks against online bullying to create awareness around the problem.

    Become a community volunteer.

    Volunteering in an anti-cyberbullying community will help you understand the problem. You can redirect bullies’ behavior and identify the victims with the necessary experience on the ground.

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    Use the celebrity card.

    Kids idolize their teen celebrities and copy them in almost everything. To our joy, there are teen celebrities like Taylor Swift, Justin Bieber, Selena Gomez, Demi Lovato and others who support online victims by sharing their personal bullying stories in popular social media like Twitter and Facebook.

    Restore self-respect.

    It is important to remember that your goal as a parent or teachers is to restore the child’s self-respect. Fast decisions won’t do any good, you need to act thoroughly. Talk to teachers before addressing the problem. Collect all of the evidence and join with like-minded parents or teachers to figure out the best possible solution.

    Featured photo credit: http://stokpic.com/ via stokpic.com

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    Last Updated on November 25, 2021

    How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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    How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

    There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

    Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

      What Does Private Browsing Do?

      When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

      For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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      The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

      The Terminal Archive

      While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

      Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

      dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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      Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

      Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

      However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

      Clearing Your Tracks

      Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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      dscacheutil -flushcache

      As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

      Other Browsers and Private Browsing

      Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

      If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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      As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

      Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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