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7 Ways To Avoid Cyberbullying

7 Ways To Avoid Cyberbullying

Have you noticed your child being too private about his/her online activity? This could be one of the fist signs you child is being cyberbullied.

Cyberbullying is a rapidly growing issue, being among one of the dangerous online issues, it has became one of the top suicide factors for teens.

Online bullying is pretty much the same as traditional bullying, except cyberbullying happens with the help of modern technologies like computers and smartphones. According to the latest statistics kids spend around 4 hours a day online, with 80% of the time via smartphones, making them one of the most common mediums for cyberbullying.

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Children aged 7-17 harass and torment each other online, using social media, IM chats and traditional texting. Some of the most frightening statistics on cyberbullying are included below:

• More than 45% of children admit to be bullied online
• 70% admit to witness someone else being bullied but were too scared to do anything
• 93% of cyberbullying attacks are being held via commenting or chatting in social media chats like Facebook or Instagram
• Online bullying victims are 3 to 9 times more likely to commit suicide
• Only 1 out 10 online victims will report their parents or teachers

The problem of cyberbullying was first raised in 2012, after the death of Amanda Todd who was severely cyberbullied. McAfee chief officer reported in her interview that 1 in 10 kids have been cyberbullied without their parents knowing.

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is your kid being cyberbullied

    7 Ways You Can Prevent Cyberbullying:

    Talk.

    It is no secret that the key to understanding children is very often a simple conversation. Ask your kid/student what online bullying is, does he/she know anyone who is being bullied and so on. This is a famous psychological trick when a child refers to “a friend” when talking about his/her own problems.

    Monitor online activity.

    While you can trust your child, you cannot trust all of the Internet’s users. Monitoring online activity is a necessary precaution rule for both parents and teachers. The best smartphone monitoring is presented with Pumpic.com a parental control app, which allows you to monitor social media, IM chats, all calls and text messages and even track real-time location of your child, using GPS navigator. As for PC, the best known app is sociallyactive.com, a PC monitoring app that allows you to view browser behavior and block inappropriate websites.

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    Engage youth and parents.

    You can start cyberbullying awareness by creating a club or community against cyberbullying. Establish a school online safety community where kids can discuss their problems and report online attacks. Kids need to know that there is help and they are not alone in this fight.

    Create a positive climate.

    Unlike parents, schools can do a lot to prevent cyberbullying. Teachers can participate in anti-cyberbullying community, create weekly meetings and even send e-newsletters. Kids can be mixed in groups and given mutual tasks against online bullying to create awareness around the problem.

    Become a community volunteer.

    Volunteering in an anti-cyberbullying community will help you understand the problem. You can redirect bullies’ behavior and identify the victims with the necessary experience on the ground.

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    Use the celebrity card.

    Kids idolize their teen celebrities and copy them in almost everything. To our joy, there are teen celebrities like Taylor Swift, Justin Bieber, Selena Gomez, Demi Lovato and others who support online victims by sharing their personal bullying stories in popular social media like Twitter and Facebook.

    Restore self-respect.

    It is important to remember that your goal as a parent or teachers is to restore the child’s self-respect. Fast decisions won’t do any good, you need to act thoroughly. Talk to teachers before addressing the problem. Collect all of the evidence and join with like-minded parents or teachers to figure out the best possible solution.

    Featured photo credit: http://stokpic.com/ via stokpic.com

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    Last Updated on February 15, 2019

    7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

    7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

    Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

    Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

    Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

    So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

    Joe’s Goals

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      Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

      Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

      Daytum

        Daytum

        is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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        Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

        Excel or Numbers

          If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

          What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

          Evernote

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            I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

            Evernote is free with a premium version available.

            Access or Bento

              If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

              Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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              You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

              Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

              All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

              Conclusion

              I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

              What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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