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Five Ways Smartphones to Search Smart

Five Ways Smartphones to Search Smart

The future of search engine optimization is coming soon. When people think of the future of cars, they think flying cars and driverless cars. Internet searches could undergo similarly radical changes. According to experts, phones may be doing the searching for us in the future. New technologies called “context searching” will allow this. We won’t have to ask for what we want. It will happen for us automatically.

Much of this is already happening. Think of the last time you bought something on Amazon. At the bottom of the order page, Amazon writes “Those who purchased X also bought Y and Z.” Similarly, Google uses your history to show you locations you might want to visit.

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Here are five ways your phone will be able to “search smart” for you in the future.

1. Scanning emails

Imagine this: Google scans your emails to find messages about flights and your travel itinerary. When a flight is delayed, you get a text alert letting you know it was delayed. The airlines also send text alerts, but in the future, your phone will search without you telling it to and will find out if your flight is delayed. Google will scan emails for other things too. For example, it might see that you have purchased books and therefore suggest other books in the same genre that you might like to read. It might find you coupons based on your coffee preferences. In the future, Google might search for coupons that could be used at the airport while you wait for the flight. It could find you a hotel if you are planning an overnight stay.

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2. Pinpoint locations

Waze and Google Maps could check your search history to determine where you might want to visit next. They could make predictions based on your past to suggest locations you should visit. If you just stopped at a coffee place, they might give you suggestions for restaurants for lunch, bookstores for relaxation, or bars for social gatherings. It might tell you to go to a supermarket when you need to. The possibilities for what your phone might search for in the future are limitless. Your phone’s guesses might not be correct all the time, but they could be a way to predict your movements.

3. Wear the latest searches

Wearable technology is a trend in itself. It can tell you how much you walked, your sleep habits, your heart rate, your calorie intake, your nutrition or lack of nutrition, and other health and wellness data. If you have had a bad night’s sleep, future phones might search for coffee places near you to help you become alert. If you have been eating poorly, your phone might search for the nearest pharmacy or vitamin store to supplement your poor nutrition. Your phone might also give you promotional offers for health and wellness facility memberships. Advertisers will have to find a way to capitalize on this trend of context searching. The data will feed into your phone, and your phone will answer your questions without your even having to ask.

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4. Help save your marriage

You might be playing a song on your phone. This song might trigger the need to send flowers to your spouse because it is Valentine’s Day or your anniversary. The phone will locate florists or go online and order them for you. The phone might add chocolates or other helpful hints that would save your marriage. If you do make a purchase from the florist, you might then receive future promotions for Mother’s Day, Christmas, etc. throughout the year when flowers are usually purchased. The flower purchases might trigger advertisements for cards, music, getaways and more to help you look good to your spouse. Search data might show that you need to apologize. You could purchase a gift to say you’re sorry. That data will trigger more options to buy.

5. Plan your outings

Imagine that you have planned a trip outdoors with your family, but the day of the event, it is raining, and you don’t want to go. Your phone could search for indoor outing possibilities, such as Laser Tag or museums. You might be given promotions for indoor activities, such as free bowling tickets. Or, you might have planned an indoor activity but want to be outdoors because the weather is so nice. In that case, your phone might search for suitable activities that are available, such rafting, paddle boats, dolphin watching, or bike rentals for exploring a park. Or, you might be on a trip and need to find something to do. The phone could anticipate your needs based on your location and send you compatible promotions.

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More by this author

Irene Fatyanova

Staff writer, Templatemonster.com

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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