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8 Unnecessary Scary Thoughts Most People Have During A Job Interview

8 Unnecessary Scary Thoughts Most People Have During A Job Interview

What happens if you forget one of your best prepared answers in the job interview? This is just one of the many scary thoughts you may have beforehand. When it actually happens, it is even more heart stopping. Other scary thoughts during the interview could really put you off your performance so let us have a look at these and look at the best way of dealing with them. Negative thoughts can rear their ugly heads during the interview but if you are well prepared, you can easily banish these and move on.

1. I have made a bad first impression

So, your handshake was a bit limp or just far too forceful?  Maybe you are so nervous that your mouth is already dry and you lost your usual poise when you entered the room. Time to move on because there is a lot to be done and you can easily recover from these minor setbacks. The interviewers’ perceptions were probably completely different anyway.

But for the next time, remember to wipe your hands before entering and also aim for a firm handshake and maintain eye contact.

2. I am taking too far too long to answer the questions

Interviewers do not expect rapid, flash answers because they can give the impression of being far too smart and even superficial. They also might give the impression of something learned off by heart, especially if it does not match exactly what was asked. So, let us get this into perspective:

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  • You cannot predict or prepare all the answers.
  • Interviewers do expect you to think about the questions before plunging in.
  • Reflection can be positive.

The solution is to play for time by asking for clarification. You might not be sure or you may need more details. You can also choose to answer partially, then jump in and ask the clarifying question. This is much better than waffling on. Also bear in mind that some questions may be deliberately ambiguous so that asking for clarification means that you are thoughtful and on the ball.

3. I am too nervous

During the interview, an attack of nerves can be very upsetting. Most of these problems need to be addressed before the interview. Try these hacks for the next time:

  • Reduce nerves by being well prepared.
  • Arrive early.
  • Learn breathing techniques to practise before being called in.
  • Run your wrists under cold water in the restroom when you arrive at the venue. This does help and also try dabbing this water behind your ears.
  • Reduce fidgeting by keeping a copy of your CV in your hand.
  • Sit comfortably so that correct breathing is facilitated.

4. I am not up to speed on the company’s mission

If you suddenly feel that there are some gaps in your knowledge, then you should have prepared more carefully. Here are some standard tasks that you need to do beforehand:

  • Research the company fully.
  • Familiarize yourself with their products, mission, projects and policies.
  • Study the job description again and make sure that your skills match the duties and prepare for some likely questions.
  • Study their publicity and brochures.

5. I cannot remember these people’s names

You may be given the names of the interviewers beforehand. One way to avoid a memory lapse is to make sure that you have researched their careers and any other notable features about them. You have seen their photos on the Linked In profiles so it will be easier to match the name and the face when the time comes. This also helps you to engage with the interviewer very quickly.

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6. I am unable to answer some of the tough questions

Questions about leadership, mundane work, weaknesses, and ambitions can really throw you. They can ask you how you define success or why you have been in a job for such a short time or even a long time. The list is endless. But preparation will stand you in good stead here. Study these questions and answers here from a well known recruitment agency in the UK.

7.  I can’t do this

Once you replace negative thoughts with positive ones, you’ll start having positive results.” – Willie Nelson

All too often, you may feel that the negative thoughts are getting the upper hand and this can be disastrous for your performance. They can distract you and cause you to give wrong or careless answers.

Keeping your thoughts positive and upbeat is the best possible way of being successful. This has been proved over and over again. In addition, sitting upright is not just a matter of looking good. It can assist in maximizing your breathing and helping you to remain confident, relaxed and optimistic.

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8. I cannot stand this silence

Very often, there are silent moments towards the end of an interview and these can be awkward for you. Traditionally, the request for questions about the company will come at this point. Make sure you have plenty of questions up your sleeve.

However, there will be other moments when it may not be so easy to fill the vacuum. As regards what salary you are expecting, this can often result in silence. One technique is to respond with a question, such as: ‘What salary range were you thinking of for this post?’  As regards remaining in touch, you can ask about who will initiate the next contact after the interview.

As we have seen, scary thoughts need not be the protagonists at your interview. Preparing well can eliminate most of these, although everyone will be nervous to some extent.

How have you coped with interview nerves and scary thoughts? Let us know in the comments below.

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Featured photo credit: Interview/Alan Cleaver via flickr.com

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Robert Locke

Author of Ziger the Tiger Stories, a health enthusiast specializing in relationships, life improvement and mental health.

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Published on March 26, 2019

How to Write a Cover Letter for a Career Change (Step-By-Step Guide)

How to Write a Cover Letter for a Career Change (Step-By-Step Guide)

Embarking on a career change, tiny or big, can be paralyzing. Regardless of the reason for your desired career change, you need to be very clear on ‘why’ you are making a change. This is essential because you need to have clarity and be confident in your career direction in order to convince employers why you are best suited for the new role or industry.

A well crafted career change cover letter can set the tone and highlight your professional aspirations by showcasing your personal story.

1. Know Your ‘Why’

Career changes can feel daunting, but it doesn’t have to be. You can take control and change careers successfully by doing research and making informed decisions.

Getting to know people, jobs, and industries through informational interviews is one of the best ways to do this.[1] Investing time to gather information from multiple sources will alleviate some fears for you to actually take action and make a change.

Here are some questions to help you refine your ‘why’, seek clarity, and better explain your career change:

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  • What makes me content?
  • How do I want work to impact my life?
  • What’s most important to me right now?
  • How committed am I to make a career change?
  • What do I need more of to feel satisfied at work?
  • What do I like to do so much that I lose track of time?
  • How can I start to explore my career change options?
  • What do I dislike about my current role or work environment?

2. Introduction: Why Are You Writing This Cover Letter?

Make this section concise. Cite the role that you are applying for and include other relevant information such as the posting number, where you saw the posting, the company name, and who referred you to the role, if applicable.

Sample:

I am applying for the role of Client Engagement Manager posted on . Please find attached relevant career experiences on my resume.

3. Convince the Employer: Why Are You the Best Candidate for the Role?

Persuade the employer that you are the best person for the role. Use this section to show that you: have read the job posting, understand how your skills contribute to the needs of the company, and can address the challenges of the company.

Tell your personal story and make it easy for hiring managers to understand the logic behind your career change. Clearly explaining the reason for your career change will show how thoughtful and informed your decision-making process is of your own transition.

Be Honest

Explain why you are making a career change. This is where you will spend the bulk of your time crafting a clear message.

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Speak to the mismatch that may be perceived by hiring managers, between the experience shown on your resume and the job posting, to show why your unique strengths make you more qualified than other candidates.

Address any career gaps on our resume. What did you do or learn during those periods that would be an asset to the role and company?

Sample:

I have been a high school English and Drama educator for over 7 years. In efforts to develop my career in a new direction, I have invested more time outside the classroom to increase community engagement by building a strong network of relationships to support school programs. This includes managing multiple stakeholder interests including local businesses, vendors, students, parents, colleagues, the Board, and the school administration.

Highlight Relevant Accomplishment

Instead of repeating what’s on your resume, let your personality shine. What makes you unique? What are your strengths and personal characteristics that make you suited for the job?

Sample:

As a joyful theater production manager, I am known to be an incredible collaborator. My work with theater companies have taught me the ability to work with diverse groups of people. The theater environment calls for everyone involved to cooperate and ensure a successful production. This means I often need to creatively and quickly think on my feet, and use a bit of humour to move things forward to meet tight timelines.

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Feature Your Transferable Skills

Tap into your self-awareness to capture your current skills.[2]

Be specific and show how your existing skills are relevant to the new role. Review the job posting and use industry specific language so that the hiring manager can easily make the connection between your skills and the skills that they need.

Sample:

As the first point of contact for students, parents, and many community stakeholders, I am able to quickly resolve problems in a timely and diplomatic manner. My problem solving aptitude and strong negotiation skills will be effective to address customer issues effectively. This combined with my planning, organization, communication, and multitasking skills makes me uniquely qualified for the role of Client Engagement Manager to ensure that customers maintain a positive view of .

4. Final Pitch and Call-To-Action: Why Do You Want to Work for This Company?

Here’s your last chance to show what you have to offer! Why does this opportunity and company excite you? Show what value you’ll add to the company.

Remember to include a call-to-action since the whole point of this letter is to get you an interview!

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Sample:

_________ is a global leader in providing management solutions to diverse clients. I look forward to an opportunity to discuss how my skills and successful experience managing multiple stakeholders can help build and retain strong customer relationships as the Client Engagement Manager.

Summing It Up

Remember these core cover letter tips to help you effectively showcase your personal brand:

  • Keep your writing clear and concise. You have one page to express yourself so make every word count.
  • Do your research to determine ‘who’ will be reading your letter. Understanding your audience will help you better persuade them that you are best suited for the role.
  • Tailor your cover for each job posting by including the hiring manager’s name, and the company name and address. Make it easy on yourself and create your own cover letter template. Highlight or alter the font color of all the spots that need to be changed so that you can easily tailor it for the next job application.
  • Get someone else to review your cover letter. At a minimum, have someone proofread it for grammar and spelling errors. Ideally, have someone who is well informed about the industry or with hiring experience to provide you with insights so that you can fine-tune your career change cover letter.

Check out these Killer Cover Letter Samples that got folks interviews!

It is very important that you clarify why you are changing careers. Your career exploration can take many forms so setting the foundation by knowing ‘why’ not only helps you develop a well thought out career change cover letter, [3] but can also help you create an elevator pitch, build relationships, tweak your LinkedIn profile and during interviews.

Remember to focus on your transferable skills and use your collective work experience to show how your accomplishments are relevant to the new role. Use the cover letter to align your abilities with the needs of the employer as your resume will likely not provide the essential context of your career change.

Ensure that your final pitch is concise and that your call-to action is strong. Don’t be afraid to ask for an interview or to meet the hiring manager in-person!

More Resources About Career Change

Featured photo credit: Christin Hume via unsplash.com

Reference

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