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10 Things You May Not Know About Journalists Though You Think You Do

10 Things You May Not Know About Journalists Though You Think You Do

As the recent experience of Angolan journalist Rafael Marques de Morais proves, there is often a high price associated with exposing truths and scandals. Facing libel charges after writing about the horrors of a country’s diamond trade, serious journalists must place themselves at considerable risk if they are to uphold the values of honesty and integrity while delivering newsworthy content to their readers. This harsh reality is often overlooked, thanks to the antics of a select few tabloid journalists and editors who deal in sensational narratives rather than those with genuine value for the reader. The importance of serious journalism should never be underestimated, however, and neither should the sacrifices that journalists make in the quest to report real news in real-time to their audience.

With a small minority of tabloid reporters responsible for an entire series of misconceptions, let’s look at the following facts about serious journalists and how they stack up against popular stereotypes:

1. They are Deadline Driven

The world of news moves quickly and in real-time, meaning that stories have to be written, edited and published to a prohibitive deadline. This poses an issue for journalists, especially those who are forced to deal with regular interruptions with colleagues as they work. This can trigger a less than welcoming response that is perceived as rudeness, when it is in fact little more than a coping mechanism that enables them to maintain focus and deal with significant pressure.

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2. They are Versatile and Adaptable

Depending on their status and background, some journalists are required to cover numerous genres of news and stories over the course of their careers. Rather than highlighting inadequate levels of focus or a lack of clear orientation, this underlines a keen sense of versatility and willingness to accept unfamiliar work with minimal notice. So while established bloggers often receive more credit in the current marketplace, it is important to remember that they are able to create single-minded content that is dictated by their existing knowledge and expertise.

3. They are Calm in the Face of Criticism

While anyone who shares their work and opinions in a public forum are opening themselves up to criticism, people often fail to realize that journalists are human beings with emotive views and feelings of their own. Criticism is particularly hard to take when it is aimed at an honest and unbiased piece of journalism, especially when it is directed by Internet trolls who well-versed in the art of dissecting sound and well-reasoned arguments. When you consider the journalists have to face such criticism on a daily basis, they are constantly required to remain calm and professional in response.

4. They are Often Their Own Harshest Critics

The nature of journalism is interesting, as each author is given individual accreditation for their work and must take ownership of the content. This breeds both pride and a yearning for self-improvement, especially when they reread a published article and uncover sentences or paragraph that they would like to restructure. In this respect, journalists are often their own harshest critics, as they learn over time to remain strong when they doubt their ability and use mistakes as motivation to further hone their craft.

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5. They Work in an Incredibly Competitive Industry

The issue of self-improvement is an interesting one, as the journalism industry is as competitive as it is fast-paced. This means that a strong work ethic and a relentless quest for self-improvement are crucial to your chances of longevity in the sector, regardless of whether you work for a traditional media firm or an online brand. Many outsiders categorize those who work within the industry as being cut-throat and ruthless, when in fact they are simply committed to succeeding and carving out a long and rewarding career.

6. They are Deceptively Humble

Although some have described journalism as “an inherently arrogant profession,” this is at odds with some of the core elements of the sector. Not only is there a strong hierarchy within any typical media or news agency that commands a degree of servitude, but the majority of writers have their work shaped, changed and embellished by meticulous editors. So without a sense of humility and respect for the chain of command, journalists would not be able to survive in the industry.

7. They Risk their Careers Everyday

While many serious journalists may be deceptively humble, they are also courageous despite carrying a burden of great responsibility. Those in the front line of their field (such as investigative journalists) are forced to place their careers at risk every single day, as they strive to deliver insightful and often difficult news to the public regardless of any influential figures who may be involved. This can cause tremendous unrest and may even trigger lawsuits, meaning that journalists must have the courage of their convictions and remain true to their values at all times.

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8. They are Part of a Thriving Industry

The traditional news industry is undoubtedly moribund, but this is often misconstrued as the death of journalism. This is far from the truth, as the number of media outlets, online news carriers and reputable blog sites has risen at a considerable rate and created even more opportunities for skilled and experienced journalists. Many of the most established writers also have the opportunity to freelance in the modern age, as they look to maximize their earnings and report news across a rich diversity of media.

9. They are Highly Skilled and Qualified Writers

Conversely, the rising number of online media outlets has also created opportunities for those without a journalism degree or any associated experience. Alongside the emergence of independent blogging as a potentially lucrative career option, this has diluted the marketplace and created a perception that many writers are able to operate without a defined skill or academic qualifications. Journalists remain set apart from other writers, however, as they are all college educated, highly talented and exceptionally knowledgeable within their fields of expertise.

10. They Live in a Male Dominated World

From a female a perspective, the drive for equality and equal opportunities in the workplace has never been more strongly backed. These efforts have not yet been fully reflected in the world of journalism, with an estimated 79% of all newspaper articles penned by a male author. This means that female journalists face an even harder challenge to sustain their careers within the sector, despite the perception that they are able to operate from a fair and even playing field.

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Featured photo credit: Pixabay via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on March 29, 2021

5 Types of Horrible Bosses and How to Beat Them All

5 Types of Horrible Bosses and How to Beat Them All

When I left university I took a job immediately, I had been lucky as I had spent a year earning almost nothing as an intern so I was offered a role. On my first day I found that I had not been allocated a desk, there was no one to greet me so I was left for some hours ignored. I happened to snipe about this to another employee at the coffee machine two things happened. The first was that the person I had complained to was my new manager’s wife, and the second was, in his own words, ‘that he would come down on me like a ton of bricks if I crossed him…’

What a great start to a job! I had moved to a new city, and had been at work for less than a morning when I had my first run in with the first style of bad manager. I didn’t stay long enough to find out what Mr Agressive would do next. Bad managers are a major issue. Research from Approved Index shows that more than four in ten employees (42%) state that they have previously quit a job because of a bad manager.

The Dream Type Of Manager

My best manager was a total opposite. A man who had been the head of the UK tax system and was working his retirement running a company I was a very junior and green employee for. I made a stupid mistake, one which cost a lot of time and money and I felt I was going to be sacked without doubt.

I was nervous, beating myself up about what I had done, what would happen. At the end of the day I was called to his office, he had made me wait and I had spent that day talking to other employees, trying to understand where I had gone wrong. It had been a simple mistyped line of code which sent a massive print job out totally wrong. I learn how I should have done it and I fretted.

My boss asked me to step into his office, he asked me to sit down. “Do you know what you did?” I babbled, yes, I had been stupid, I had not double-checked or asked for advice when I was doing something I had not really understood. It was totally my fault. He paused. “Will you do that again?” Of course I told him I would not, I would always double check, ask for help and not try to be so clever when I was not!

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“Okay…”

That was it. I paused and asked, should I clear my desk. He smiled. “You have learnt a valuable lesson, I can be sure that you will never make a mistake like that again. Why would I want to get rid of an employee who knows that?”

I stayed with that company for many years, the way I was treated was a real object lesson in good management. Sadly, far too many poor managers exist out there.

The Complete Catalogue of Bad Managers

The Bully

My first boss fitted into the classic bully class. This is so often the ‘old school’ management by power style. I encountered this style again in the retail sector where one manager felt the only way to get the best from staff was to bawl and yell.

However, like so many bullies you will often find that this can be someone who either knows no better or is under stress and they are themselves running scared of the situation they have found themselves in.

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The Invisible Boss

This can either present itself as management from afar (usually the golf course or ‘important meetings) or just a boss who is too busy being important to deal with their staff.

It can feel refreshing as you will often have almost total freedom with your manager taking little or no interest in your activities, however you will soon find that you also lack the support that a good manager will provide. Without direction you may feel you are doing well just to find that you are not delivering against expectations you were not told about and suddenly it is all your fault.

The Micro Manager

The frustration of having a manager who feels the need to be involved in everything you do. The polar opposite to the Invisible Boss you will feel that there is no trust in your work as they will want to meddle in everything you do.

Dealing with the micro-manager can be difficult. Often their management style comes from their own insecurity. You can try confronting them, tell them that you can do your job however in many cases this will not succeed and can in fact make things worse.

The Over Promoted Boss

The Over promoted boss categorises someone who has no idea. They have found themselves in a management position through service, family or some corporate mystery. They are people who are not only highly unqualified to be managers they will generally be unable to do even your job.

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You can find yourself persistently frustrated by the situation you are in, however it can seem impossible to get out without handing over your resignation.

The Credit Stealer

The credit stealer is the boss who will never publically acknowledge the work you do. You will put in the extra hours working on a project and you know that, in the ‘big meeting’ it will be your credit stealing boss who will take all of the credit!

Again it is demoralising, you see all of the credit for your labour being stolen and this can often lead to good employees looking for new careers.

3 Essential Ways to Work (Cope) with Bad Managers

Whatever type of bad boss you have there are certain things that you can do to ensure that you get the recognition and protection you require to not only remain sane but to also build your career.

1. Keep evidence

Whether it is incidents with the bully or examples of projects you have completed with the credit stealer you will always be well served to keep notes and supporting evidence for projects you are working on.

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Buy your own notebook and ensure that you are always making notes, it becomes a habit and a very useful one as you have a constant reminder as well as somewhere to explore ideas.

Importantly, if you do have to go to HR or stand-up for yourself you will have clear records! Also, don’t always trust that corporate servers or emails will always be available or not tampered with. Keep your own content.

2. Hold regular meetings

Ensure that you make time for regular meetings with your boss. This is especially useful for the over-promoted or the invisible boss to allow you to ‘manage upwards’. Take charge where you can to set your objectives and use these meetings to set clear objectives and document the status of your work.

3. Stand your ground, but be ready to jump…

Remember that you don’t have to put up with poor management. If you have issues you should face them with your boss, maybe they do not know that they are coming across in a bad way.

However, be ready to recognise if the situation is not going to change. If that is the case, keep your head down and get working on polishing your CV! If it isn’t working, there will be something better out there for you!

Good luck!

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