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Your Life Will Change When You Own A Personal Website, This Is How…

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Your Life Will Change When You Own A Personal Website, This Is How…

The benefits of having your own website are surprisingly diverse. For one, a personal website a powerful tool in your professional life, often providing you with new job opportunities and a better way to introduce yourself. But it’s also very much an outlet for you to share a little more about yourself and connect with your audience on a deeper level. Here are twelve benefits of having your own website.

1. You Can Showcase Your Work

The most obvious professional use of a website is as a portfolio for your body of work, whether that be in the form of art, writing samples or something more or less eclectic. This is particularly advantageous for someone in a creative field, but a portfolio can be useful in a number of industries.

2. You Can Show Your Experience

Because you’re not limited by the constraints of a Word document, the web is a much more exciting way to demonstrate your experience than a simple resume. Benefits of your own website include uploading videos to give people an idea of your skills and posting commendations you’ve received from grateful clients/customers.

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3. You Can Show Your Expertise

With a blog on your website you can prove yourself to potential employers that you’re a valuable source of information about a whole host of topics. Write about things you know well that fit into the same career niche until you build up enough credibility that employers will be dying to get you on their team.

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    4. You Can Share MORE

    Resumes are supposed to be no more than two pages, and lately the trend has been to trim it to one. With a website your space is virtually unlimited. Don’t fill any one web page with too much content, but link to other pages on your website in case readers want more detail about an aspect about you or your experience.

    5. You Can Control The Google Search

    If you spend enough time developing your website, you may be able to get it to the top of search engine results for your full name, and a website is a much more interesting and unique introduction than, say, a Facebook or LinkedIn profile.

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    6. You Can Demonstrate Your Transparency

    If you put links to your social media accounts on the website, you’ll prove to recruiters that you have absolutely nothing to hide!

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      7. You Can Show That You’re Tech Savvy

      This is especially useful for workers close to or past standard retirement age. Show anyone looking into you that you know a thing or two about how to use new technology.

      8. You Can Make A Better First Impression

      Not super social? Less of a problem with a website. Design (or hire someone to design) a snazzy site that lays out who you are and what you can do for an employer so that you’ll be a desirable hire even if you aren’t particularly socially adept when you eventually meet face to face.

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      9. You Can Be Found

      Put simply, a website is another opportunity for an employer to find you during their search. If you’re looking to cover all angles, well, a website is one of those angles.

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        10. You Can Find Yourself

        You don’t necessarily have to limit your website’s blog to the industry you’re working in. You can branch off into new subjects that interest you and experience some real personal growth from sharing your passions with the world.

        11. You Can (Possibly) Carve A Career Out Of It

        It’s a bit of a long shot, sure, but a number of people have successfully turned a personal website into a full-time career. Popular blogs generate some ad revenue, you can sell e-books and other products to your readers or you can utilize crowdfunding tools like Patreon or Kickstarter to turn your readers’ support into revenue.

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        12. You Can Have A Voice

        With a website/blog you can raise awareness about subjects and causes that are matter to you. A personal website can be a powerful platform to help the world understand things about you they might not even be able to discover if they shared a meal with you. Sometimes it’s just nice to be heard, and if you put enough effort into creating something special with your website, you can be heard loud and clear.

        Featured photo credit: Steve Bridger via flickr.com

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        Matt OKeefe

        Matt is a marketer and writer who shares about lifestyle and productivity tips on Lifehack.

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        Last Updated on January 13, 2022

        How to Use Travel Time Effectively

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        How to Use Travel Time Effectively

        Most of us associate travel and time with what we’re going to do one we get to our destination. Planning and mapping out what to do once you arrive can certainly make for a more pleasurable vacation, but there are things you can do while you are on your way that can make it even better.

        Sure, you can plan for the things you’re going to do on your vacation while you are travelling en route – but what about making use of that time for other things that you don’t usually do when you’re at home? You don’t need to have your gadgets with you to do it, and you can really connect with yourself if you take the time to manage your life while heading towards your vacation destination.

        Here are some great tips to help you with your time management while you travel, some of which are more conventional than others. Nonetheless, you can find out what works best for you and apply them accordingly depending on when and how you are travelling.

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        1. Take Your Time Getting There

        As I write this, I’m on a flight to San Francisco. Flying is the fastest way to get from place to place, and for many people it’s really the only way to travel.

        But I’ve often taken the train or ferry on trips so that I have extra time without distraction to get more done. I’m not worrying about navigation or lack of space to do what I want to do. Instead I’m able to focus on getting stuff done during the time I’ve got without feeling rushed. For example, when I took the train from Vancouver to Portland, it was an eight hour trip and I managed to get a ton of writing done and closed a lot of open loops. It also was less expensive than flying, which was a bonus.

        Sometimes taking the long way to get somewhere on vacation can be the best thing for you to get somewhere with your life.

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        2. Go Gadget-Free

        This is going to be a tough one for a lot of you. But why do you need to bring your gadgets with you when you go on vacation? It isn’t be a bad idea to leave all but one of them behind, and only pull out that one when you absolutely need to do so. In some countries, you’d be wise to be discreet with them anyway since flaunting them in front of those that are less fortunate than you isn’t a good practice. While it may not seem like flaunting to you, in different cultures it can definitely come across that way.

        If you can’t go gadget-free, then at least go Internet-free. If you use a task management app that requires syncing across your multiple devices to be effective, remember that if you only have the one device with you then it can be the “master device” for the time being and will store your data locally anyway. Just sync up when you get home.

        3. Reflect and Prepare

        Finally, going on any sort of excursion gives you the perfect opportunity to reflect on where you’ve been. The fact you have removed yourself from where you usually are can give you a perspective that you simply can’t get when you’re at home. You may want to journal your thoughts during this time – and by taking more time to get to your destination you’ll have more time to dig deeper into it.

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        After a period of reflection – however long that happens to be – you can then begin to not only prepare for the rest of your travels, you can prepare for the rest of what happens afterward. The reflection period is important, though. You need to really know where you’ve been in order to properly look at where you want to be. Time away from things gives you that chance.

        Conclusion

        Traveling isn’t always about where you’re going and how quickly you can get there. In fact, it’s rarely about that at all.

        More often it’s where you’re at in your head that will dictate how much you benefit from traveling. So don’t just go somewhere fast. Instead, take your time on the way there and take the time to connect with not only where you are but who are while you’re there.

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        If you do that, you’ll have a better chance to be who you want to be when you leave.

        Featured photo credit: bruce mars via unsplash.com

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