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Your Life Will Change When You Own A Personal Website, This Is How…

Your Life Will Change When You Own A Personal Website, This Is How…

The benefits of having your own website are surprisingly diverse. For one, a personal website a powerful tool in your professional life, often providing you with new job opportunities and a better way to introduce yourself. But it’s also very much an outlet for you to share a little more about yourself and connect with your audience on a deeper level. Here are twelve benefits of having your own website.

1. You Can Showcase Your Work

The most obvious professional use of a website is as a portfolio for your body of work, whether that be in the form of art, writing samples or something more or less eclectic. This is particularly advantageous for someone in a creative field, but a portfolio can be useful in a number of industries.

2. You Can Show Your Experience

Because you’re not limited by the constraints of a Word document, the web is a much more exciting way to demonstrate your experience than a simple resume. Benefits of your own website include uploading videos to give people an idea of your skills and posting commendations you’ve received from grateful clients/customers.

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3. You Can Show Your Expertise

With a blog on your website you can prove yourself to potential employers that you’re a valuable source of information about a whole host of topics. Write about things you know well that fit into the same career niche until you build up enough credibility that employers will be dying to get you on their team.

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    4. You Can Share MORE

    Resumes are supposed to be no more than two pages, and lately the trend has been to trim it to one. With a website your space is virtually unlimited. Don’t fill any one web page with too much content, but link to other pages on your website in case readers want more detail about an aspect about you or your experience.

    5. You Can Control The Google Search

    If you spend enough time developing your website, you may be able to get it to the top of search engine results for your full name, and a website is a much more interesting and unique introduction than, say, a Facebook or LinkedIn profile.

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    6. You Can Demonstrate Your Transparency

    If you put links to your social media accounts on the website, you’ll prove to recruiters that you have absolutely nothing to hide!

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      7. You Can Show That You’re Tech Savvy

      This is especially useful for workers close to or past standard retirement age. Show anyone looking into you that you know a thing or two about how to use new technology.

      8. You Can Make A Better First Impression

      Not super social? Less of a problem with a website. Design (or hire someone to design) a snazzy site that lays out who you are and what you can do for an employer so that you’ll be a desirable hire even if you aren’t particularly socially adept when you eventually meet face to face.

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      9. You Can Be Found

      Put simply, a website is another opportunity for an employer to find you during their search. If you’re looking to cover all angles, well, a website is one of those angles.

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        10. You Can Find Yourself

        You don’t necessarily have to limit your website’s blog to the industry you’re working in. You can branch off into new subjects that interest you and experience some real personal growth from sharing your passions with the world.

        11. You Can (Possibly) Carve A Career Out Of It

        It’s a bit of a long shot, sure, but a number of people have successfully turned a personal website into a full-time career. Popular blogs generate some ad revenue, you can sell e-books and other products to your readers or you can utilize crowdfunding tools like Patreon or Kickstarter to turn your readers’ support into revenue.

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        12. You Can Have A Voice

        With a website/blog you can raise awareness about subjects and causes that are matter to you. A personal website can be a powerful platform to help the world understand things about you they might not even be able to discover if they shared a meal with you. Sometimes it’s just nice to be heard, and if you put enough effort into creating something special with your website, you can be heard loud and clear.

        Featured photo credit: Steve Bridger via flickr.com

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        Matt OKeefe

        Matt is a marketer and writer who shares about lifestyle and productivity tips on Lifehack.

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        Last Updated on January 25, 2021

        6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity

        6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity

        Perfectionism sounds like a first world problem, but it stifles creative minds. Having a great idea but doubting your ability to execute it can leave you afraid to just complete and publish it. Some of the most successful inventors failed, but they kept going in pursuit of perfection. On the other end of the spectrum, perfectionism can hinder people when they spend too much time seeking recognition, gathering awards and wasting time patting themselves on the back. Whatever your art, go make good art and don’t spend time worrying that your idea isn’t perfect enough and certainly don’t waste time coming up with a new idea because you’re still congratulating yourself for the last one.

        1. Remember, perfection is subjective.

        If you’re worried about achieving perfectionism with any single project so much that you find yourself afraid to just finish it, then you aren’t being productive. Take a hard look at your work, edit and revise, then send it our into the world. If the reviews aren’t the greatest, learn from the feedback so you can improve next time.

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        2. Procrastination masquerades itself as perfectionism.

        People who procrastinate aren’t always lazy or trying to get out of doing something. Many who procrastinate do so because perfectionism is killing their productivity, telling them that if they wait a better idea will come to them.

        3. Recognize actions that waste time.

        Artists and all creative people need time to incubate; those ideas will only grow when properly watered, but if you’re not engaging in an activity that will help foster creativity, you might just be wasting time. Remember to do everything with purpose, even relaxing.

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        4. Don’t discriminate against your worth.

        No one is actually perfect. We often have tremendous ideas or write things that move people emotionally, but no one attains that final state of being perfect. So, don’t get down if your second idea isn’t as good as your first—or vice versa. Perfectionists tend to be the toughest critics of their work, so don’t criticize yourself. You are not your work no matter how good or how bad.

        5. Stress races your heart and freezes your innovation.

        Stress is a cyclic killer that perfectionists know well because that same system that engages and causes your palms to sweat over a great idea is the same system that kicks in and worries you that you’re not good enough. Perfectionism means striving for that ultimate level, and stress can propel you forward excitedly or leave you shaking in fear of the next step.

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        6. Meeting deadlines beats waiting for perfect work.

        Don’t let your fear of failure prevent you from meeting your deadline. Perfection is subjective and if you’re wasting time or procrastinating, you should just finish the job and learn from any mistakes. Being productive means completing work. You shouldn’t try for months or even years to perfect one project when you can produce projects that improve over time.

        Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

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