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10 Small Things You Can Do To Save Time In the Office

10 Small Things You Can Do To Save Time In the Office

Are you looking to save time in the office without having to do a complete overhaul of your schedule or calendar?

Here are 10 things you can do to shave minutes from your regular work routine:

Create a document template.

Check your schedule and emails from the last month for hints on what documents you most frequently use, then create a set of templates for these items. Starter ideas include: email queries and confirmations, proposals, contact forms, contracts, agendas, presentation decks, agendas, and financial reports.

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Set up folders and filters in your email inbox.

Automate the email sorting process by setting up different folders and filters in your email program. You could have your emails filtered by people (clients, supervisors, coworkers, and vendors), work projects (administrative tasks, in-house work, client work, and research), or email subscriptions, and then appropriately sent to the correct folder.

Prepare mini agendas for informal meetings.

Make the most of your informal meetings with supervisors or colleagues with a mini agenda. This doesn’t have to be a formal document, simply list out the different items, tasks, questions, and concerns you want to discuss before your meeting. Not only will you have a handy guide for your meetings, but you’ll also have a record of projects, tasks and items discussed.

Give up folder tabs.

Tired of wasting your time fiddling with all those little plastic tabs that come with hanging folders? Give up those teeny tabs and simply label manila folders themselves. Make it easier for you to identify files at a glance by using different color manila folders and/or hanging files. For example, you might use green folders for financial documents, red folders for current projects and so on.

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Save yourself a few clicks.

Are you making the most out of your work devices? Take a moment to set up the speed dial function on your work or cell phone for frequently dialed numbers and set up bookmarks on your internet browser or use a bookmark service for regularly visited sites. Likewise, if you regularly use a computer application or program, learn some keyboard shortcuts to help you save time as you work.

Make a process or task checklist.

Streamline routine processes or tasks by creating a checklist of must-do items. This can be particularly helpful for items you do every other month or so, such as running reports, backing up files or updating items on a website or server. Create detailed notes and instructions on the different tasks you need to complete for your project.

Keep cleaning supplies within reach.

Stop wasting your time climbing over all those office supplies in the back room just to get a dust cloth. Carve out a space in a nearby desk drawer, cabinet or shelf and stock it with office cleaning supplies. Mix and match any of the following and of course feel free to add in your supplies as needed: dust cloth, duster, lint roller, computer screen wipes and cleaner, disinfectant wipes and/or gel, a roll of paper towels, and window cleaner.

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Pre-schedule online lunch orders.

Do you regularly order lunch at work? Some restaurants and cafes have online ordering systems that allow you to place and schedule meal orders anywhere from a couple of days to a few weeks in advance. Check your favorite lunch spots to see if they offer this service and save yourself the hassle of placing daily orders.

Set a timer.

Keep work meetings on track by setting and following a timer. You’ll know exactly how much time you’ve spent working and how much time you have left available to you in each of your meetings. You might also want to consider setting a timer for different tasks while you work to better track your own time.

Store emergency materials in a drawer.

Be prepared for emergencies at a moment’s notice. Clear out space in a nearby desk drawer and pull together a little kit of emergency materials including, but not limited to: a flashlight, glow stick, small first aid kit, backup medication, umbrella, small radio, spare batteries, energy or granola bars, and bottles of water.

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What small action will you try out to save yourself a couple of minutes at work? Leave a comment below.

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Rashelle Isip

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Last Updated on September 11, 2019

Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

How often do you feel overwhelmed and disorganized in life, whether at work or home? We all seem to struggle with time management in some area of our life; one of the most common phrases besides “I love you” is “I don’t have time”. Everyone suggests working from a to-do list to start getting your life more organized, but why do these lists also have a negative connotation to them?

Let’s say you have a strong desire to turn this situation around with all your good intentions—you may then take out a piece of paper and pen to start tackling this intangible mess with a to-do list. What usually happens, is that you either get so overwhelmed seeing everything on your list, which leaves you feeling worse than you did before, or you make the list but are completely stuck on how to execute it effectively.

To-do lists can work for you, but if you are not using them effectively, they can actually leave you feeling more disillusioned and stressed than you did before. Think of a filing system: the concept is good, but if you merely file papers away with no structure or system, the filing system will have an adverse effect. It’s the same with to-do lists—you can put one together, but if you don’t do it right, it is a fruitless exercise.

Why Some People Find That General To-Do Lists Don’t Work?

Most people find that general to-do lists don’t work because:

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  • They get so overwhelmed just by looking at all the things they need to do.
  • They don’t know how to prioritize the items on list.
  • They feel that they are continuously adding to their list but not reducing it.
  • There’s a sense of confusion seeing home tasks mixed with work tasks.

Benefits of Using a To-Do List

However, there are many advantages working from a to-do list:

  • You have clarity on what you need to get done.
  • You will feel less stressed because all your ‘to do’s are on paper and out of your mind.
  • It helps you to prioritize your actions.
  • You don’t overlook so many tasks and forget anything.
  • You feel more organized.
  • It helps you with planning.

4 Golden Rules to Make a To-Do List Work

Here are my golden rules for making a “to-do” list work:

1. Categorize

Studies have shown that your brain gets overwhelmed when it sees a list of 7 or 8 options; it wants to shut down.[1] For this reason, you need to work from different lists. Separate them into different categories and don’t have more than 7 or 8 tasks on each one.

It might work well for you to have a “project” list, a “follow-up” list, and a “don’t forget” list; you will know what will work best for you, as these titles will be different for everybody.

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2. Add Estimations

You don’t merely need to know what has to be done, but how long it will take as well in order to plan effectively.

Imagine on your list you have one task that will take 30 minutes, another that could take 1 hour, and another that could take 4 hours. You need to know the moment you look at the task, otherwise you undermine your planning, so add an extra column to your list and include your estimation of how long you think the task will take, and be realistic!

Tip: If you find it a challenge to estimate accurately, then start by building this skill on a daily basis. Estimate how long it will take to get ready, cook dinner, go for a walk, etc., and then compare this to the actual time it took you. You will start to get more accurate in your estimations.

3. Prioritize

To effectively select what you should work on, you need to take into consideration: priority, sequence and estimated time. Add another column to your list for priority. Divide your tasks into four categories:

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  • Important and urgent
  • Not urgent but important
  • Not important but urgent
  • Not important or urgent

You want to work on tasks that are urgent and important of course, but also, select some tasks that are important and not urgent. Why? Because these tasks are normally related to long-term goals, and when you only work on tasks that are urgent and important, you’ll feel like your day is spent putting out fires. You’ll end up neglecting other important areas which most often end up having negative consequences.

Most of your time should be spent on the first two categories.

4.  Review

To make this list work effectively for you, it needs to become a daily tool that you use to manage your time and you review it regularly. There is no point in only having the list to record everything that you need to do, but you don’t utilize it as part of your bigger time management plan.

For example: At the end of every week, review the list and use it to plan the week ahead. Select what you want to work on taking into consideration priority, time and sequence and then schedule these items into your calendar. Golden rule in planning: don’t schedule more than 75% of your time.

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Bottom Line

So grab a pen and paper and give yourself the gift of a calm and clear mind by unloading everything in there and onto a list as now, you have all the tools you need for it to work. Knowledge is useless unless it is applied—how badly do you want more time?

To your success!

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Featured photo credit: Emma Matthews via unsplash.com

Reference

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