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10 Signs of a Doer (and How to be a Good One)

10 Signs of a Doer (and How to be a Good One)

Doers are deemed extremely valuable in groups and organizations. They are the go-to guys and girls when troubles arise. Discover if you have the 10 signs of a doer and learn how to be better one.

1. You start work with clear objectives in mind.

Good doers don’t just dive into a project without thinking. They rein in their enthusiasm long enough to formulate objectives and figure out a plan in order to succeed in whatever they’re set to do. Good doers give themselves enough time to think and plan.

2. You measure your own productivity.

Good doers know how to measure their own productivity and revel in it. Most even have a personal, internal “scoring” system. Following their own progress provides them a challenging working environment, firing them up to work harder. Good doers find and use tools to help measure their productivity (such as Toggl and RescueTime).

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3. You like feeling busy but like seeing results more.

Good doers love that “busy” feeling, but they don’t allow it to cloud their judgement. They need to see tangible outcomes that show work is indeed done. To ensure their efforts are not wasted, they make use of timelines to track progress.

4. You know how to balance quality and quantity.

Good doers don’t skimp on quality despite their eagerness to do more. Though they thrive on increased productivity measured in numbers, they also make sure to set standards for quality. When working on a project, they do regular self-evaluation or ask a trusted person for feedback.

5. You create your own motivation.

Good doers are self-motivated. They look forward to working hard and improving their internal “score”. They take advantage of this wonderful trait by setting more and more challenging goals every time they finish a project. They are also humble enough to use tools that help reach their goals.

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6. You relish being surrounded by other hardworking people.

Good doers like to work with other good doers, especially if they share the same goals. They know that working together is the best opportunity to compete and cooperate without anyone feeling like they lost. They find, or better yet, create an encouraging community of people who share the same goals as they do, such as GoalChiever.

7. You volunteer.

Good doers are “natural’ volunteers. They like to participate in activities that require actual work, even without pay. And while volunteering is great, good doers make sure that they leave enough time for themselves. They schedule their volunteer work appropriately so they don’t tire themselves out.

8. Your personality leans toward extroversion.

Most good doers are extroverts, especially when the work involved requires the constant company of many people. They have an almost perpetual reserve of energy that ignites enthusiasm in others.

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But this doesn’t mean introverts aren’t doers. Actually, introverts reign supreme when it comes to doing solitary work (and play). This means employers shouldn’t be so quick to judge quiet employees!

9. You teach through action.

Good doers prefer to teach by, yes, doing. They demonstrate rather than explain and often encourage their students or mentees to learn by working.

As this isn’t always a good thing, good doers make sure to encourage whoever they’re teaching to ask questions. They take the time to answer them and give feedback as well.

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10. You value the importance of celebrating accomplishments.

Good doers know when to stop working. They create regular opportunities to celebrate their achievements and progress and allow themselves the time to rest and recharge their bodies.

Doers tend to want to move on to the next challenge right after they finish their last one. But good doers make sure to acknowledge their successes by making celebration part of the plan from the very beginning.

While doers aren’t perfect, there’s no denying they posses some great qualities that we could use more of. So if you show the signs of a doer, learn and appreciate your strengths and work on your weaknesses. The world needs you to use your unique qualities.

More by this author

7 Positives Only Introverts Would Understand signs of a doer 10 Signs of a Doer (and How to be a Good One) 7 Signs You’re Not As Smart As You Think You Are

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Last Updated on March 23, 2021

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

You need more than time management. You need energy management

1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

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I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

2. Determine your “peak hours”

Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

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My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

3. Block those high-energy hours

Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

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Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

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Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

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