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10 Movies You Should Watch To Boost Your Mood And Energy

10 Movies You Should Watch To Boost Your Mood And Energy
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If you’re like me, you love films. Movies have the power to effect our entire mood. They make us want to change ourselves and even change the world. There are films that make you cry (when you need a good cry), films that help you vent your frustrations and films that enliven you.

Here are 10 movies with themes that range from motivational to fun. This list includes Hollywood classics and Pixar titles, and every one of them has the potential to leave you feeling inspired, motivated or bring you to your happy place.

1. Meet John Doe

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    “I know a lot of you are saying, ‘What can I do? I’m just a little punk. I don’t count.’ Well, you’re dead wrong.The little punks have always counted because in the long run, the character of a country is the sum total of the character of its little punks.” – Long John Willoughby/John Doe

    Meet John Doe is the quintessential ‘fight for the underdog’ film. Gary Cooper’s character represents the John Doe’s of America. The movie includes a series of speeches about empowering the average citizen. Its theme is about the power of the people and never thinking you don’t matter just because you’re an Average Joe. Its message of hope and determination will leave you feeling self-confident, better about humanity and optimistic about the potential of the world’s citizens to enact positive change.

    2. Chariots of Fire

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      “You came to see a race today. To see someone win. It happened to be me. But I want you to do more than just watch a race. I want you to take part in it. I want to compare faith to running in a race. It’s hard. It requires concentration of will, energy of soul.” – Eric Liddell

      This film has a spiritual foundation in its message, but isn’t about religion. Eric challenges conventional thinking and questions what it means to glorify God. For those of us who are not spiritual, this can mean making your mark on the world the best way you can, regardless of how others think you should. Chariots of Fire is about endless determination, working hard towards achieving your goals, being proud of your accomplishments and doing what you love. Its infamous ‘running on the beach scene’ might be a cheesy pop culture reference, but anyone who tells you they didn’t feel at least a little inspired by that scene is lying. Nothing gets the heart pumping like watching an intense race!

      3. The King’s Speech

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        “King George VI: L-listen to me…”

        “Lionel Logue: Why should I waste my time listening to you?”

        “King George VI: Because I have a right to be heard! I have a voice!”

        “Lionel Logue: …Yes, you do. You have such perseverance, Bertie. You’re the bravest man I know. You’ll make a bloody good king.”

        The King’s Speech is the true story of the former King of England, George VI, and his journey to overcome a debilitating stammer. Not only is The King’s Speech a heartening film, it also has gorgeous cinematography. The color schemes might be cool and dark, but the plot is anything but. It’s hard to feel hopeless when you’re watching a king struggle, just like commoners. The movie makes you realize even the royals have mortifying moments and personal flaws. It will leave you renewed and determined to conquer your obstacles.

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        4. Remember the Titans

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          “This is where they fought the battle of Gettysburg. Fifty thousand men died right here on this field, fighting the same fight that we are still fighting amongst ourselves today… Listen to their souls, men. ‘I killed my brother with malice in my heart. Hatred destroyed my family.’ You listen, you take a lesson from the dead. If we don’t come together right now on this hallowed ground, we too will be destroyed, just like they were.” – Coach Boone

          This movie is a cult classic, and rightly so. If you’re not interested in sports, don’t let that deter you from watching this movie. Although it’s about a high school football team, the personal and professional obstacles the team and their coach must overcome are highly relatable. Watching the characters prevail against prejudice, and learn to work as a team, is something we can all be motivated by. Remember the Titans will make you feel ready to take on the world.

          5. Up

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            “That might sound boring, but I think the boring stuff is the stuff I remember the most.” – Russell

            Once you get past its tear-jerking opening, Up is full of feel-good moments. This is one of those go-to movies when you need a pick-me-up, or to need to feel like there’s some good left in this world (even if the world appears computer-animated). If you’re feeling low, or just kind of “blah”, Up will never fail to boost your mood.

            6. School of Rock

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              “Dude, I service society by rocking. I’m out there on the front lines liberating people with my music.” – Dewey Finn

              As the Dewey says in the film, “You’re not hardcore, unless you live hardcore.” If you need more than just a mood boost, but an energy boost as well, few movies beat School of Rock. It’s hilarious and jam-packed with classic rock anthems to pump you up. Plus, there are a few gems of actual heart-warming advice in there. Rock on, kids.

              7. The King and I
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                Kralahome: “Why are you so blind; have you no eyes to see? King tries impossible task – wishing to be scientific man who know all modern things… He will only tear himself in two, trying to be something he can never be!”

                Anna: “Of course he can never be, if those who are closest to him are unwilling to help him!”

                Another classic from the way-back machine, The King and I has a unique premise and provides a good laugh too. The silly, 1950s era “cultural differences” between the King of Siam and the English-bred schoolteacher in his court are ridiculous and entertaining. Among the one-liners, there’s also a good story about breaking down cultural barriers in order to understand one another. Add this movie to your bucket list, it’s a classic that is still relevant in modern times.

                8. Despicable Me

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                  “When we were adopted by a bald guy, I thought this would be more like ‘Annie’.” – Edith

                  Despicable Me is so enjoyable, that I don’t even mind when my little brother asks to watch it a million times. This is one of those kid movies that appeals to adults too. When you’re feeling grumpy, or extra jaded, watching this movie will easily lift your spirits. The sequel isn’t half bad either.

                  9. Cool Runnings

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                    “Hey, it doesn’t matter tomorrow if they come in first or fiftieth. Those guys have earned the right to walk into that stadium and wave their nation’s flag. That’s the single greatest honor an athlete can ever have. That’s what the Olympics are all about. Sixteen years ago I forgot that. Don’t you go and do the same.” – Irving “Irv” Blitzer

                    Pure inspiration and motivation, Cool Runnings is a film you won’t forget. This is a must-see movie. The plot, a group of native-born Jamaicans trying to train for Olympic bobsledding, provides all the comedy you could ever want. The movie is based on a true story and the raw determination of the athletes is energizing. Their story is remarkable and if you only pick one film from this entire list – watch this one.

                    10. Legally Blonde

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                      “I just don’t think that Brooke could’ve done this. Exercise gives you endorphins. Endorphins make you happy. Happy people just don’t shoot their husbands, they just don’t.” – Elle Woods

                      If you’ve never seen Legally Blonde, don’t write it off as a chick flick. The lead character, Elle Woods, is a boss. Watching her disprove all the people who doubted her intelligence is truly satisfying. You’ll feel like taking on a room full of haters after seeing her slay in and out of the courtroom. And you’ll learn the famous ‘bend and snap’…just try not to break anyone’s nose.

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                      Featured photo credit: Meet John Doe/Warner Bros. Entertainment via doctormacro.com

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                      Last Updated on July 21, 2021

                      The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

                      The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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                      No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

                      Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

                      Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

                      A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

                      Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

                      In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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                      From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

                      A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

                      For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

                      This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

                      The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

                      That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

                      Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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                      The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

                      Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

                      But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

                      The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

                      The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

                      A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

                      For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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                      But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

                      If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

                      For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

                      These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

                      For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

                      How to Make a Reminder Works for You

                      Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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                      Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

                      Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

                      My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

                      Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

                      I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

                      More on Building Habits

                      Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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                      Reference

                      [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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