Advertising
Advertising

10 Bad Emails Habits You Need to Stop Doing Now

10 Bad Emails Habits You Need to Stop Doing Now

One thing’s sure: we all work with email. We even use them to communicate and organize our personal lives. But if you really think about it, what are emails really for? Collaborating? Planning? Managing? Group discussions? In fact, none of the above.

Emails were designed for one on one conversations (or small groups conversations at most). They should not be used to synchronize a team or plan an event, because over-using emails simply leads to productivity loss and a waste of time.

Here are 10 bad emails habits you need to stop doing now.

Advertising

1. CC’ing unnecessary people for « FYI »

CC’ing people to update them on information almost always leads to confusion. The person CC’ed wonders if he needs to take action. Should they respond? Should they forward your info? A CC’ed email contains information that most people won’t be able to process anyway.

2. Using the « Reply to All » button

When you receive an email with multiple people CC’ed, don’t automatically send your answer to everyone! You’ll just end up polluting everyone else’s inbox. Try only answering the person concerned; it doesn’t necessarily need to become a group discussion.

3. Picking the wrong subject line

The subject should be well chosen. Don’t just write « Hello from … »; instead, try to give as many details as you can in the shortest format possible. For example: « Meeting 02/15 Documents ». When receiving the email, your correspondent needs to understand what your email is about just by reading its subject. Don’t make them guess what’s inside; be explicit and concise.

Advertising

4. Using capitalized letters

Using CAPITALIZED letters won’t make your email more urgent than others, and by the way, you should not be the one deciding what’s urgent in someone else’s inbox. In an email, capitalized letters are interpreted as aggressive and intrusive SCREAMING, and they don’t build a constructive conversation.

5. Not prioritizing answers

Not every email need to be answered right away. So you should classify and prioritize them accordingly. The problem is, your inbox is the worst tool to use. In fact, your best bet might be an external application. The perfect email is an email that can be deleted; it’s not supposed to hold information. So you need to prioritize your answers in your to do list and transfer the information that an email contains to another place.

6. Using unnecessary words

Just like your email subject line, your email body should be very explicit and concise. Go straight to the point and avoid as much unnecessary blah-blah as possible. Most people don’t read everything in their emails, so if you facilitate the job by giving short useful information, by bulletproofing your content and by saying which actions should be taken, you’re saving everyone tons of time (and you’re making people happy).

Advertising

7. Using email for everything

Whether you need to say something to someone, to send information and documents, to share an idea and gather feedback, to plan an event or to synchronize your team, don’t use emails every time. Try to think about the message you want to deliver, and use the right tool for each specific message. Emails are not always the right medium to communicate what you need.

8. Managing a team project with email

Managing a team project with email often leads to frustration, misunderstanding, confusion and in the end, a bad outcome. When you’re organizing a team project, you need to delegate tasks, share information and follow up on everyone’s work. But emails are just a way to communicate, not plan. Change your habits and find a better way to manage your teamwork without email!

9. Classifying your email

Stop wasting your time classifying your emails. One good thing about email inboxes is that there’s a search bar. This feature allows you to find any information at any time. Classifying your emails will just take a lot of time for very poor productivity improvements.

Advertising

10. Sticking with email because…

It’s the only way to organize your work and the only communication tool you know? Maybe it’s time to change the way you work with your team and with your clients, and not to mention, the way you plan your day.

More by this author

How to Start a Remote Working Culture in Your Company 5 Marketing Disruptions to Anticipate in 2016 10 Bad Emails Habits You Need to Stop Doing Now 5 Practical Ways to Make Your To-Do List Work 10 Tools to Become a More Productive Marketer

Trending in Productivity

1 How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day 2 7 Things to Remember When You’re Going Through Tough Times in Life 3 20 Productive Hobbies That Will Make You Smarter and Happier 4 Ditch Work Life Balance and Embrace Work Life Harmony 5 The Pomodoro Technique: Is It Right for You to Boost Productivity?

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on May 24, 2019

How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

If you’ve ever wondered how to be productive at home or how you could possibly have a more productive day, look no further.

Below you’ll find six easy tips that will help you make the most out of your time:

1. Create a Good Morning Routine

One of the best ways to start your day is to get up early and eat a healthy breakfast.

CEOs and other successful people have similar morning routines, which include exercising and quickly scanning their inboxes to find the most urgent tasks.[1]

You can also try writing first thing in the morning to warm up your brain[2] (750 words will help with that). But no matter what you choose to do, remember to create good morning habits so that you can have a more productive day.

If you aren’t sure how to make morning routine work for you, this guide will help you:

The Ultimate Morning Routine to Make You Happy And Productive All Day

Advertising

2. Prioritize

Sometimes we can’t have a productive day because we just don’t know where to start. When that’s the case, the most simple solution is to list everything you need to get accomplished, then prioritize these tasks based on importance and urgency.

Week Plan is a simple web app that will help you prioritize your week using the Covey time management grid. Here’s an example of it:[3]

    If you get the most pressing and important items done first, you will be able to be more productive while keeping stress levels down.

    Lifehack’s CEO, Leon, also has great advice on how to prioritize. Take a look at this article to learn more about it:

    How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

    3. Focus on One Thing at a Time

    One of the biggest killers of productivity is distractions. Whether it be noise or thoughts or games, distractions are a barrier to any productive day. That’s why it’s important to know where and when you work best.

    Advertising

    Need a little background noise to keep you on track? Try working in a coffee shop.

    Can’t stand to hear even the ticking of a clock while writing? Go to a library and put in your headphones.

    Don’t be afraid to utilize technology to make the best of your time. Sites like [email protected] and Simply Noise can help keep you focused and productive all day long.

    And here’s some great apps to help you focus: 10 Online Apps for Better Focus

    4. Take Breaks

    Focusing, however, can drain a lot of energy and too much of it at once can quickly turn your productive day unproductive.

    To reduce mental fatigue while staying on task, try using the Pomodoro Technique. It requires working on a task for 25 minutes, then taking a short break before another 25 minute session.

    After four “pomodoro sessions,” be sure to take a longer break to rest and reflect.

    Advertising

    I like to work in 25 and 5 minute increments, but you should find out what works best for you.

    5. Manage Your Time Effectively

    A learning strategies consultant once told me that there is no such thing as free time, only unstructured time.

    How do you know when exactly you have free time?

    By using the RescueTime app, you can see when you have free time, when you are productive, and when you actually waste time.

    With this data, you can better plan out your day and keep yourself on track.

    Moreover, you can increase the quality of low-intensity time. For example, reading the news while exercising or listening to meeting notes while cooking. Many of the mundane tasks we routinely accomplish can be paired with other tasks that lead to an overall more productive day.

    A bonus tip, even your real free time can be used productively, find out how:

    Advertising

    20 Productive Ways to Use Your Free Time

    6. Celebrate and Reflect

    No matter how you execute a productive day, make sure to take time and celebrate what you’ve accomplished. It’s important to reward yourself so that you can continue doing great work. Plus, a reward system is an incredible motivator.

    Additionally, you should reflect on your day in order to find out what worked and what didn’t. Reflection not only increases future productivity, but also gives your brain time to decompress and de-stress.

    Try these 10 questions for daily self reflection.

    More Articles About Daily Productivity

    Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

    Reference

    Read Next