Advertising
Advertising

7 Practical Tips For Young Investors

7 Practical Tips For Young Investors

Time is an investor’s closest friend; with good resources and appropriate skills, the more time you have, logically, the more you are going to earn. The inflation is growing at an increasing rate, and markets are becoming more unpredictable every day. These conditions are indeed getting worse with the passage of time. Therefore, investment is a decent option to build a nest egg for your future. For young investors this is not only a good way to accumulate their wealth in future, but young investors can also supplement their income; save for a house; and/or save for college.

There are several investment options open to a young investor, for instance, saving in a back account, buying common stock, real estate, stock mutual funds, and short-term Certificate of Deposits. Each kind of option will have its own benefits and demerits; it depends on the investor’s purpose.

Advertising

For example, if you are saving for your retirement and your age is 25 and you start with a $300 regular monthly deposit earning 9% annual rate for the next 40 years, till your retirement age of 65, you will accumulate approximately $1,420,000.

Therefore there are several key steps to be taken into account when investing. Here are 7 tips for young investors saving for the future:

Advertising

1. Begin your investing activities as early as possible

The earlier you start investing in your life the less financial burdens you will have in the future. For example, spouse and kids expenses, mortgages etc. will come at a later point in your life in your late 20’s or 30’s. Hence, you can easily make a regular substantial monthly payment in the initial years of your youth. Investing early will also have more interest compounding, meaning you can invest in high risk – high return stocks.

2. Learn and educate yourself with the entire process

It’s essential to be familiar with the market, and understand the business you’re investing in. The example given in the beginning, $1.42 million may look a huge sum but its future value maybe equivalent to that of $40000 of today. Therefore for a couple that wants to use that money after their retirement for another 20 years or so will not benefit much. Therefore, it is essential that you know the process; the costs involved in the stocks and equity options.

Advertising

3. Choosing between Stocks and Bonds

Young investors find it difficult to choose between bonds and stocks. Stocks are more risky but have a higher return than bonds in the long term. According to NBC News, in the 75 years from 1931 through 2005, large U.S. stocks earned annualized returns of 10.5 percent. That means, an investment of just $1 grew to $1,787. In the same 75 years, long-term U.S. government bonds earned returns of 5.5 percent. That meant an investment of $1 grew to $55.45. But bonds do have an advantage over stocks: the promise of payment. Where a stock may not have any form of payout in the future.

4. Learn to save rather than spend

To be an investor, you need money. To have money you need to save rather than spend. This advice is the most obvious one given out by top business professionals. Hence without ado, to be a successful investor you must do something that nobody in the world wants you to do: save some of your money instead of spending it.

Advertising

5. Diversify your portfolio

Diversifying you portfolio means you must at all-time maintain a portfolio that is composed of all kinds of assets: from high risk to medium risk to low risk. The medium and low risk asset compensates the high risk one and the aggregate returns are generally higher than a single asset portfolio. The wise decision to make is to re-invest your returns to earn greater returns, rather than spend those returns. For an investor, this is the best way to prevent a massive setback. Numerous studies have determined that asset allocation is the most important aspect affecting performance and volatility of your investment. In fact, 91% of the portfolio return is based on asset allocation, just 2% on market timing, 5% on stock selection and 2% on other factors.

6. Manage your savings and your debts

Some people make a bad habit of spending money based on future expected inflows. This is clearly a mistake, relying on a raise in income that has not yet been confirmed. Therefore, always choose to spend your money based on your actual and current financial state as this can prevent some serious credit crunch issues in the future and spare extra money for investments.

7. Get to know the taxes and inflation

Mostly Investors forget how much inflation and taxation can affect their returns. Inflation will impact your real returns; if inflation is high real returns will be low. The future inflation rate will also impact your future earnings. For example, if you have earned a return of 21% in a year on your portfolio and the inflation is 17% for the year, you have actually earned 4%. Therefore, inflation affects returns badly.  There are asset options that are either have a tax liability or are a tax- deferred account. Make sure you know your tax policy and that a tax-deferred account will build wealth faster than a tax-liability account.

Featured photo credit: www.ladailypost.com via ladailypost.com

More by this author

Tayyab Babar

Tayyab is a PR/Marketing consultant. He writes about work, productivity and tech tips at Lifehack.

10 Traits of Sucessful Heroic Leaders 25 Signs That You’re A Mentally Strong Person 10 Astonishing Benefits of Marmite That Will Turn Your Hatred Into Love 5 Fun Ways to Make Money Online That You Should Try 4 Crucial Startup Mistakes That Can Kill Your Business: How You Can Avoid

Trending in Money

1 How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt 2 How to Use Debt Snowball to Get out from a Financial Avalanche 3 How Personal Finance Software Helps You Get More Out of Your Money 4 The Best Ways to Save Money Even Impulsive Spenders Can Get Behind 5 How to Answer the Tough Question: What are Your Salary Requirements?

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

Advertising

Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

Advertising

I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

Advertising

Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

Advertising

So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

Read Next