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Why You Shouldn’t Be Drinking Soda… That Includes Diet Soda

Why You Shouldn’t Be Drinking Soda… That Includes Diet Soda

“A Yale University Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity study found that a majority of Americans understand that soda is bad for them. But despite this, a Gallup poll reveals that 48% of surveyed Americans — nearly half! — drink soda on a daily basis. What’s more, among those who drank soda, the average daily intake was 2.6 glasses per day.” – A Huffington Post article 

As the Huffington Post article stated above, almost half of Americans drink soda. Many people know that it is bad for their health. But do people know exactly WHY soda is bad for them?

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    Here is a list of how and why soda is bad for you:

    Note: These are just SOME of the effects that soda has on your body. If you are curious about the full effects that soda has on your body, check out some of the articles I quoted in this post.

    Chicken bone experiment

    Have you ever watched the “chicken bone” experiment? Ever heard of it? The “chicken bone in soda” is a science experiment used to show children the negative effects of soda. The chicken bone is left in a bowl of soda for several days and you actually witness the changes to the chicken bone – it becomes weaker and weaker. That’s right, soda can make your bones weak and brittle. However, soda doesn’t directly weaken your bones when you drink it, but it can directly damage your teeth. Soda causes tooth decay and cavities. This video is the most visual way that soda can impact your health.

    Weight gain

    Soda is loaded with sugar and it is easy to drink in a short period of time. A 20-year study on 120,000 men and women found that people who increased their sugary drink consumption by one 12-ounce serving per day gained more weight over time—on average, an extra pound every 4 years—than people who did not change their intake. Weight gain and obesity can trigger a number of problems like cancer and early death.

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    Increased risk of diabetes

    According to the infographic provided by Visual.ly, those who drink more soda have an 80% increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

    It’s not just regular soda that is bad for you, diet soda is too.

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      Here is a list of the effects diet soda can have on your body…

      Diet soda weight gain

      Diet soda is different from regular soda because of the artificial sweeteners. According to a Health.com article, artificial sweeteners trigger insulin, which sends your body into fat storage mode and leads to weight gain. A University of Texas Health Science Center study found the more diet sodas a person drank, the greater their risk of becoming overweight. Downing just two or more cans a day increased waistlines by 500%. Why? Artificial sweeteners disrupt the body’s natural ability to regulate calorie intake based on the sweetness of foods. Basically… diet soda doesn’t help you lose weight. It does the opposite.

      Diet soda increases risk of diabetes

      Drinking one diet soda a day was associated with a 36% increased risk of metabolic syndrome and diabetes in a University of Minnesota study. Metabolic syndrome describes a cluster of conditions (including high blood pressure, elevated glucose levels, raised cholesterol, and large waist circumference) that put people at high risk for heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Diet soda is associated with a number of heart problems and it throws off your metabolism.

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      Kidney problems

      Diet soda has been proven by scientific studies that it can cause kidney damage. Kidney decline wasn’t associated with regular soda, so scientists think it is because of the artificial sweeteners.

      Cell damage (yes, the list just keeps going!)

      Diet sodas contain something many regular sodas don’t: mold inhibitors. They go by the names sodium benzoate or potassium benzoate, and they’re in nearly all diet sodas. But many regular sodas, such as Coke and Pepsi, don’t contain this preservative. Eek, that means it causes damage to your DNA.

      You get the idea: it doesn’t matter if you choose regular or diet soda. Both versions of soda are bad for you. For a quick summary of the effects soda can have on your health, Visual.ly has a very useful infographic. As you can see, soda causes a plethora of health issues: obesity, increased risk of diabetes, tooth decay, weaker bones, reproductive issues and more.

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      My advice: Kick the soda habit and drink more healthier beverages like water. Your body will thank you later.

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        Last Updated on September 15, 2020

        4 Ways to Deal With Big Life Changes in a Positive Way

        4 Ways to Deal With Big Life Changes in a Positive Way

        Life changes are constant. Whether it’s in the workplace or our relationships, nothing in life ever remains the same for long.

        Regardless of the gravity of change, it can always be a little scary. So scary, in fact, that some people are downright crippled by the idea of it, causing them to remain stagnant through anxiety.

        Have you ever noticed how much of life’s transitional periods are riddled with anxious vibes? The quarter life crisis, the mid-life crisis, cold feet before getting married, retirement anxiety, and teenage angst are just a few examples of transitional periods when people tend to panic.

        We can’t control every aspect of our lives, and we can’t stop change from happening. However, how we respond to change will greatly affect our overall life experience.

        Here are 4 ways you can approach life changes in a positive way.

        1. Don’t Fight It

        I once heard one of my favorite yoga instructors say “Suffering is what occurs when we resist what is already happening.” The lesson has stuck with me ever since.

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        Life changes are usually out of our control. Rather than trying to manipulate the situation and wishing things were different, try flowing with it instead.

        Of course, some initial resistance is natural if we’re going into survival mode. Just make sure you are conscious of when this resistance is no longer serving you.

        If you’re feeling anxious about impending life changes, it’s time to practice some techniques to address the anxiety directly. These can include meditation, exercise, talking with friends about how you’re feeling, or journaling.

        If you’re worried about a big life change, such as starting a new job[1] or moving in with your partner, do your best to control your expectations. It may help you to talk with people you know about their experiences going through similar changes. This will help you form a realistic picture in your mind of what things will look like post-change.

        2. Find Healthy Ways to Deal With Feelings

        Whenever we’re in transitional periods, it can be easy to lose track of ourselves. Sometimes we feel like we’re being tossed about by life and like we’ve lost our footing, causing some very uncomfortable feelings to arise.

        One way we can channel these feelings is by finding healthy ways to release them. For instance, whenever I find myself in a difficult transitional phase, I end up in a mixed martial arts studio.

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        The physical activity helps me channel my emotions and release endorphins. It also helps me get in shape, which generally increases my mood and energy levels.

        Exercise is important in cultivating positive emotions, but if you’re struggling with anxiety in particular, it’s important to cultivate a regular exercise routine as opposed to a one-off workout. One study found that “Aerobic exercise can promote increase in anxiety acutely and regular aerobic exercise promotes reduction in anxiety levels”[2].

        If exercise isn’t your thing, there are other, less intense ways of cultivating positive emotions and reducing anxiety around life changes. You can try stretching, meditating, reading in nature, spending time with family and friends, or cooking a healthy meal.

        Find what makes you feel good and helps you ground yourself in the present moment.

        3. Reframe Your Perspective

        Reframing perspectives is a very powerful tool used in life coaching. It helps clients take a situation they are struggling with, such as a major life change, and find some sort of empowerment in it.

        Some examples of disempowered thinking during life changes include casting blame, focusing on negative details, or victimizing[3]. These perspectives can make awkward transitional phases much worse than they have to be.

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        Meanwhile, if we utilize a more positive perspective, such as finding a lesson in the situation, realizing that there may be an opportunity for something, or that everything passes, we can come from a greater place of ease.

        4. Find Time for Self-Reflection

        Having time to reflect is important at any stage in your life, but it’s especially important during transitional periods. It’s quite simple really: we need our time to step back and get centered when things get a little crazy.

        As a result, big life changes are perfect for doing some self-reflection. They are opportunities to check in with ourselves and practice getting grounded for a few minutes.

        Take a look at this reflective cycle adapted from Glibb’s Self-reflection guide (1988):[4]

        Use self-reflection when facing life changes.

          Self-reflective exercises include meditating, yoga or journaling,[5] all of which require some quiet time to get yourself together.

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          One study found that journal improves “self-efficacy, locus of control, and learning”[6]. A healthy sense of self-control can make the process of change easier to bear, so that in itself is a great reason to try self-reflection through journaling.

          To learn how to start journaling, you can check out this article.

          Final Thoughts

          Big life changes may rock us for a little while, but they don’t have to be as bad as we initially perceive them. If handled in a positive manner, transitional periods can pave the way for some serious self-growth, reflection, and awareness.

          Cultivate a sense of positivity and find ways to diminish the anxiety around life changes. Once you make it to the other side, you’ll be grateful that you made it through in the best way possible.

          More Tips on Facing Life Changes

          Featured photo credit: Alora Griffiths via unsplash.com

          Reference

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