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7 Vitamins and Supplements You Shouldn’t Be Taking

7 Vitamins and Supplements You Shouldn’t Be Taking

Everyone seems to be vitamin crazy in the 21st century. The problem is that they might not all be as beneficial for you as you may think. Now before you freak out, just remember that you can get healthy, recommended doses of most vitamins and minerals through actual food that is healthy for you—remember food?—and these won’t hurt you. Keeping that in mind, let’s take a look at some of the most popular vitamins and supplements that you shouldn’t be taking.

1. Calcium

Despite the fact that we’re told to have high volumes of calcium in our diet, calcium supplements can actually be dangerous, particularly for people over 50. This is because older bodies can have more difficulty absorbing the mineral, which can lead to it being absorbed by the walls of arteries, as opposed to the bones. This can result in a hardening of the arteries, which in turn can lead to strokes and heart disease.

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If you need to be taking calcium supplements, stay clear of calcium carbonate, which is particularly difficult for your bones to absorb. Instead, take calcium citrate, along with magnesium, which will aid with absorption. Alternatively: Got milk? No, really, if you have some then you should drink it.

2. Prenatal Vitamins…When You’re Not Pregnant

You may wonder why any woman would take prenatal vitamins when they’re not pregnant or preparing for pregnancy. The answer is simple—shinier hair, clear skin and stronger nails. Sure, this all sounds positive, but there is a danger in taking supplements that aren’t meant for you. For example, prenatal vitamins contain more iron than a non-pregnant woman needs, and having an excess of that in your body can lead to constipation, vomiting and nausea. Basically, you’ll get all of the terrible parts of pregnancy without the glow and gifts. Who would want that? Similarly, the excess folic acid contained in the vitamins can leave you with a rapid heart rate, tingling in your toes, and memory loss. In short, leave these bad boys for the actual pregnant ladies.

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3. Creatine

If you’re a gym junkie you may have heard of this supplement. Generally, it’s used post-workout in order to build and repair muscle. However, research has shown that excessive use can result in dehydration as well as kidney damage. In addition, it can worsen the symptoms of people who suffer with asthma. President of Cenegenics Carolinas, Dr. Mickey Barber, recommends that you should only take it under medical supervision.

4. Vitamin C

For the most part, vitamin C tablets are harmless. However, 2000mg or more can increase your risk of kidney stones—and nobody wants tiny rocks stabbing them from the inside. The main issue with vitamin C supplements is that they’re unnecessary. Studies have shown that their prevention of the common cold is a mere myth.

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Furthermore, unless you’re eating like a sailor from 1750, you’re unlikely to need them to ward off scurvy. Just eat plenty of fruits and vegetables and you’ll be fine.

5. Soy Isolate

Not the same as Soylent Green. That would be bad.

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Soy isolate can be found in some brands of protein bars and shakes, but there can be a downside for you men folk. Unfortunately, it can have an estrogen effect, which becomes stronger in older men whose bodies are already having trouble balancing their estrogen and testosterone levels. If you still aren’t clear on the visual, it means that it can result in breast formation, or gynecomastia, in men.

If you gents want to get the full benefits of soy without the cleavage, I recommend pure edamame and tofu.

6. Yohimbe

If you haven’t heard of yohimbe before, that could very well be because you don’t suffer from erectile dysfunction. Congratulations, you can skip this one! Bark from the yohimbe tree contains yohimbine, which is a substance that can appear in supplements that are used to treat the above. The problem is that it can also result in serious heart arrhythmia problems, as well as high blood pressure. As an alternative, try increasing your exercise and general health, and if you feel like you still need a supplement, try DHEA.

7. Multivitamins

Basically these are money wasters that result in little more than expensive urine. Oh, except for the part where they’re potentially harmful. A 25-year study of 38,772 women has shown that the risk of death is actually increased for those who had engaged in long-term use of multivitamins, vitamin B6, folic acid, iron, magnesium, zinc, and copper. Seriously, just eat some vegetables!

More by this author

Tegan Jones

Tegan is a passionate journalist, writer and editor. She writes about lifestyle tips on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on April 8, 2020

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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The leap happens when we realize two things:

  1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
  2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

“Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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