Advertising
Advertising

5 Lies About Healthy Food That Are Making You Fat

5 Lies About Healthy Food That Are Making You Fat

Most of what we’ve been taught about nutrition is catastrophically wrong. Our diets are now overloaded with highly processed packaged foods filled with chemicals we can’t pronounce, refined carbohydrates and sugars, unhealthy animals that are pumped full of antibiotics, and sugar-sweetened snacks and drinks.

It comes as no surprise that developed countries are plagued by obesity.

The sad fact is we’re all victims of the loathsome deceptions of the food industry.

You have a choice though: continue to be the victim or arm yourself with the knowledge to make better choices for your health.

Clearly you’ve chosen the latter.

Advertising

So pat yourself on the back and sit back and relax as we explore five of the biggest lies about so-called healthy food.

Lie #1: Low fat products are healthy.

It’s easy to get confused when you see health claims plastered all over low fat versions of your favorite foods at the grocery store. But here’s the truth: fat is good for you (the right types, of course). Your body needs it. And worst of all, the fat in low-fat foods is often replaced with more sugar, salt and highly-processed ingredients, which can do more harm than good.

One study found that a high fat, low carb diet can actually lower your cholesterol and blood glucose levels. Another showed that low fat diets aren’t any better for weight loss than high fat, lower carb diets.

And this study published in the Journal of Marketing Research showed that people who saw a “low fat” label on a food package ate up to 50 percent more than those who didn’t!

For years we’ve been told to avoid saturated fat too, but a research analysis of nearly 350,000 patients found no link between saturated fat and heart disease.

Advertising

The evidence is clear: forget low fat. Eat more foods with healthy fats, like fatty fish, olive oil, nuts, and avocados.

Lie #2: Eggs raise your cholesterol.

Let’s stop hating on eggs and put this healthy eating lie to rest once and for all. Because they’re one of the most nutrient-dense foods on the planet.

Mainstream nutrition authorities have you believing that eggs raise your cholesterol and your risk of heart disease. Not true. Dietary cholesterol has very weak associations with blood cholesterol. Translation: eating foods high in cholesterol doesn’t raise cholesterol for most people.

Research shows eating eggs does NOT increase your risk of heart disease and stroke. And eating eggs for breakfast may actually help you lose weight faster. That’s enough to sway me to keep eating my eggs every morning.

Lie #3: Vegetable oils are healthier than butter.

This is a source of major confusion and for good reason. Health “authorities” like Harvard are still telling people to eat more highly processed vegetable oils. Let’s set the record straight.

Advertising

Some vegetable oils (olive oil, for example) are good for you. Others, like the soybean oil and corn oil found in the majority of processed foods, are high in inflammation-causing Omega-6 fatty acids.

And the scariest part is, two well designed studies show that eating foods high in Omega-6 fatty acids may actually increase your risk of heart disease. Check ’em out here and here.

Stick with all-natural, healthy sources of fat like olive oil, coconut oil and butter from grass fed cows.

Lie #4: Gluten-free products will help you lose weight.

Let’s end the myth about gluten free eating: it’s not all it’s cracked up to be and it’s completely unnecessary for the majority of folks. If you have celiac disease or a sensitivity to gluten then eating gluten free products is essential. For everyone else, it’s not.

Researchers in this study said doctors “should exercise caution when diagnosing gluten sensitivity.” And another study found that eating a gluten free diet has absolutely no implications on weight loss.

Advertising

Unless your doctor gives you a specific reason to do so, don’t waste your money on gluten free products.

Lie #5: Products that say “healthy” on the package are good for you.

We are inundated with health claims on food packages. From sugar-filled cereals that are a “good source of whole grains” to “heart healthy” pseudo-butter products that have no trace of real butter, food companies exploit the FDA’s lax guidelines on food claims.

Here’s a good tip: don’t pay attention to the front of food packages. Turn it around and look at the back to see the only objective information on the package: the list of ingredients and nutrition facts. Or better yet, buy real foods that don’t come in a package.

Knowledge is power, folks. Learn to recognize these 5 healthy food lies when you see them and you’ll set yourself up for a lifetime of better health.

More by this author

Scott Christ

Scott Christ is a writer, entrepreneur, and founder of Pure Food Company.

achieve your goals 8 Simple and Effective Ways to Reach Your Ultimate Goals I Want To Be Happy: 7 Science-Backed Ways to Find Happiness 17 Things Emotionally Strong People Don’t Do 10 Things To Do When You Are Feeling Down 10 Things a Happy Person Does Differently

Trending in Health

1 15 Simple Ways to Boost Your Emotional Health 2 7 Stress Management Techniques to Get You Back on Track 3 Weight Loss Plan And Program: Create Your Own One 4 4 Simple Desk-Based Stretches for Effective Lower Back Pain Relief 5 Why You Should Go For Vitamin D But Not Vitamin C To Prevent The Cold

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on April 8, 2020

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

Advertising

Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

Advertising

The leap happens when we realize two things:

  1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
  2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

Advertising

Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

Advertising

In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

“Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

Read Next