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5 Lies About Healthy Food That Are Making You Fat

5 Lies About Healthy Food That Are Making You Fat

Most of what we’ve been taught about nutrition is catastrophically wrong. Our diets are now overloaded with highly processed packaged foods filled with chemicals we can’t pronounce, refined carbohydrates and sugars, unhealthy animals that are pumped full of antibiotics, and sugar-sweetened snacks and drinks.

It comes as no surprise that developed countries are plagued by obesity.

The sad fact is we’re all victims of the loathsome deceptions of the food industry.

You have a choice though: continue to be the victim or arm yourself with the knowledge to make better choices for your health.

Clearly you’ve chosen the latter.

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So pat yourself on the back and sit back and relax as we explore five of the biggest lies about so-called healthy food.

Lie #1: Low fat products are healthy.

It’s easy to get confused when you see health claims plastered all over low fat versions of your favorite foods at the grocery store. But here’s the truth: fat is good for you (the right types, of course). Your body needs it. And worst of all, the fat in low-fat foods is often replaced with more sugar, salt and highly-processed ingredients, which can do more harm than good.

One study found that a high fat, low carb diet can actually lower your cholesterol and blood glucose levels. Another showed that low fat diets aren’t any better for weight loss than high fat, lower carb diets.

And this study published in the Journal of Marketing Research showed that people who saw a “low fat” label on a food package ate up to 50 percent more than those who didn’t!

For years we’ve been told to avoid saturated fat too, but a research analysis of nearly 350,000 patients found no link between saturated fat and heart disease.

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The evidence is clear: forget low fat. Eat more foods with healthy fats, like fatty fish, olive oil, nuts, and avocados.

Lie #2: Eggs raise your cholesterol.

Let’s stop hating on eggs and put this healthy eating lie to rest once and for all. Because they’re one of the most nutrient-dense foods on the planet.

Mainstream nutrition authorities have you believing that eggs raise your cholesterol and your risk of heart disease. Not true. Dietary cholesterol has very weak associations with blood cholesterol. Translation: eating foods high in cholesterol doesn’t raise cholesterol for most people.

Research shows eating eggs does NOT increase your risk of heart disease and stroke. And eating eggs for breakfast may actually help you lose weight faster. That’s enough to sway me to keep eating my eggs every morning.

Lie #3: Vegetable oils are healthier than butter.

This is a source of major confusion and for good reason. Health “authorities” like Harvard are still telling people to eat more highly processed vegetable oils. Let’s set the record straight.

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Some vegetable oils (olive oil, for example) are good for you. Others, like the soybean oil and corn oil found in the majority of processed foods, are high in inflammation-causing Omega-6 fatty acids.

And the scariest part is, two well designed studies show that eating foods high in Omega-6 fatty acids may actually increase your risk of heart disease. Check ’em out here and here.

Stick with all-natural, healthy sources of fat like olive oil, coconut oil and butter from grass fed cows.

Lie #4: Gluten-free products will help you lose weight.

Let’s end the myth about gluten free eating: it’s not all it’s cracked up to be and it’s completely unnecessary for the majority of folks. If you have celiac disease or a sensitivity to gluten then eating gluten free products is essential. For everyone else, it’s not.

Researchers in this study said doctors “should exercise caution when diagnosing gluten sensitivity.” And another study found that eating a gluten free diet has absolutely no implications on weight loss.

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Unless your doctor gives you a specific reason to do so, don’t waste your money on gluten free products.

Lie #5: Products that say “healthy” on the package are good for you.

We are inundated with health claims on food packages. From sugar-filled cereals that are a “good source of whole grains” to “heart healthy” pseudo-butter products that have no trace of real butter, food companies exploit the FDA’s lax guidelines on food claims.

Here’s a good tip: don’t pay attention to the front of food packages. Turn it around and look at the back to see the only objective information on the package: the list of ingredients and nutrition facts. Or better yet, buy real foods that don’t come in a package.

Knowledge is power, folks. Learn to recognize these 5 healthy food lies when you see them and you’ll set yourself up for a lifetime of better health.

More by this author

Scott Christ

Scott Christ is a writer, entrepreneur, and founder of Pure Food Company.

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

Reference

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