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5 Delicious Recipes You Can Try On With Vegetables

5 Delicious Recipes You Can Try On With Vegetables

So, some people think that only rabbits eat vegetables and vegetables are gross and tasteless. You need to rethink that. Vegetables are packed with nutrients, are light and great for people who are looking to loose weight.

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    Wanna cook tasty and simple dishes with vegetables? Do you love to try new recipes but running short on vegetarian recipes? I hope you like these 5 delicious recipes you can try on with vegetables.

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    1. Vegetable soup

    Garden-Vegetable-Soup

      Don’t want to put too much time into cooking but still want a nutritious breakfast which includes all the vegetables? Making soup is the best idea in these times. Boil a cup of vegetables of your choice in salted water. My favorites are carrots, zucchini, split peas, broccoli and cauliflowers. Keep the boiled veggies aside. Blanch three to four tomatoes and make their puree. You can boil the veggies and puree the tomatoes and keep them in air tight containers in refrigerator. It will save your time in the morning when you are in a rush to prepare breakfast. Take a saute pan. On low flame, heat a tablespoon of butter, add a teaspoon of chopped garlic and ginger and two tablespoons of chopped green onions in it. Saute them for a minute. Add the tomato puree and the boiled veggies. Add a cup or two of water. Add a few chopped coriander leaves, roasted almonds, salt and pepper to taste. Cook for five minutes on high flame. And done! You can have it with grilled cheese sandwich for a healthy breakfast.

      2. Blanched Cabbage Meal

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        Roughly cut some cabbage leaves. Blanch them in boiling salty water. Drain them and keep aside. Take a saute pan. Heat a tablespoon of olive oil. Add a small teaspoon of powdered cloves and ginger powder. Add a teaspoon of chopped garlic. Saute the mixture for a while. After the garlic-y raw smell goes away, add the cabbage leaves to the pan, some boiled peas(optional), a little bit of pepper, and a pinch of turmeric powder(optional) and mix well. Done. You can have it with hot cooked long grain rice or pasta for a fulfilling lunch.

        3. Baked eggplants

          Don’t care much about eggplants? Try this recipe and you will fall in love with them. Bake 2 cups of chopped eggplants till they are soft. Remove their skin and keep them aside. Take a saute pan. Heat olive oil, add a teaspoon of chopped garlic and one chopped green chilly. Cook for two minutes. Add a cup of chopped tomatoes. Cook till the liquid reduces. Add the baked eggplants, dried oregano, salt and pepper to taste. Mix well and serve it hot. It’s an awesome mid meal snack. Yummy!

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          4. Creamy mushrooms and green beans

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            Wash the green beans, chop them and boil them in salted water. Strain the beans and keep them aside. Take a saute pan. Heat a teaspoon of butter. Add two tablespoons of chopped onions. Saute till they are golden brown in color. Add the washed and chopped mushrooms and cook till the mushrooms release most of their moisture. Then, add the boiled beans. Add cream, a teaspoon of black pepper, a little bit of crushed red pepper and salt according to taste. Cook for five to ten minutes. Sprinkle with parsley and serve it hot with macaroni salad for a delicious supper.

            5. Yummy potatoes

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              Running low on energy? Try this. Boil two to three medium sized potatoes. Peel them and mash them well with salt and black pepper. Take a saute pan. Heat a tablespoon of olive oil. Saute two tablespoons of green onions till they become golden in color. Add the mashed potatoes and mix well. There you go! Sprinkle with parsley and serve it hot with tomato ketchup.

              Say yes to rabbit food and start eating healthy!

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                Featured photo credit: Sam Petar via flickr.com

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                Last Updated on October 23, 2018

                Science Says Knitting Makes Humans Warmer And Happier, Mentally

                Science Says Knitting Makes Humans Warmer And Happier, Mentally

                My mother was a great knitter and produced some wonderful garments such as Aran sweaters which were extremely fashionable when I was young. She also knitted while my father drove, which caused great amusement. I often wondered why she did that but I think I know the answer now.

                Knitting is good for your mental health, according to some research studies. The Washington Post mentions a 2013 survey of about 3,500 knitters who were asked how they felt after a knitting session. Over 80% of them said they definitely felt happier. It is not a totally female occupation as more and more men take it up to get the same benefits. Harry Styles (One Direction) enjoys knitting. So does Russell Crowe although he does it to help him with anger management!

                The Neural Knitwork Project

                In Australia, Neural Knitworks was started to encourage people to knit and also become aware of neuroscience and mental health issues. Knit-ins were organized but garments were not the only things created. The knitters produced handmade neurons (1,665 of them!) to make a giant brain. The 2015 project will make more neural knitted networks (neural knitworks) and they will be visible online. You can see some more examples of woolly neurons on the Neural Knitworks Facebook page.

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                While people knitted, crocheted and crafted yarn, they listened to experts talking about mental health issues such as addiction, dementia, depression, and how neurons work.

                The knitting and neural connection

                The human brain has about 80 billion neurons. Learning new skills, social interaction, and physical activity all help to forge neural connections which keep the brain healthy and active. They are creating networks to control movement and make memories. The knitters learn that as they create the woollen neurons, their own neurons are forming new pathways in their brains. Their creations are mimicking the processes in their brains to a certain extent. At the same time, their brains are registering new and interesting information as they learn interesting facts about the brain and how it works. I love the knitworks and networks pun. What a brilliant idea!

                More mental health benefits from knitting

                Betsan Corkhill is a physiotherapist and has published some results of completed studies on her website, appropriately named Stitchlinks. She conducted some experiments herself and found that knitting was really helpful in reducing panic and anxiety attacks.

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                “You are using up an awful lot of brain capacity to perform a coordinated series of movements. The more capacity you take up by being involved in a complex task, the less capacity you have for bad thoughts.”- Betsan Corkhill

                Knitters feel happier and in a better mood

                Ann Futterman-Collier, Well Being Lab at Northern Arizona University, is very interested in how textile therapy (sewing, knitting, weaving and lace-making) can play an important role in mood repair and in lifting depressive states.

                She researched 60 women and divided them into three different groups to do some writing, meditating and work with textiles. She monitored their heartbeat, blood pressure and saliva production. The women in the textiles group had the best results when their mood was assessed afterwards. They were in a better mood and had managed to reduce their negative thoughts better than those in the writing and meditation groups.

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                “People who were given the task to make something actually had less of an inflammatory response in the face of a ‘stressor’.” – Dr. Futterman Collier

                The dopamine effect on our happiness

                Our brains produce a chemical called dopamine. This helps us to feel happy, more motivated, and assists also with focus and concentration. We get a boost of dopamine after sex, food, exercise, sleep, and creative activities.

                There are medications to increase dopamine but there are lots of ways we can do it naturally. Textile therapy and crafting are the easiest and cheapest. We can create something and then admire it. In addition, this allows for a little bit of praise and congratulations. Although this is likely not your goal, all these can boost our dopamine and we just feel happier and more fulfilled. These are essential in facing new challenges and coping with disappointment in life.

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                “Sometimes, people come up to me when I am knitting and they say things like, “Oh, I wish I could knit, but I’m just not the kind of person who can sit and waste time like that.” How can knitting be wasting time? First, I never just knit; I knit and think, knit and listen, knit and watch. Second, you aren’t wasting time if you get a useful or beautiful object at the end of it.” – Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit’s End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much.

                If you thought knitting and textiles were for old ladies, think again!

                Featured photo credit: DSC_0012/Mary-Frances Main via flickr.com

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