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13 Benefits of Kiwifruit That Make It More Adorable

13 Benefits of Kiwifruit That Make It More Adorable

Did you know that the kiwifruit originally came from the Kang Chiang Valley in China and is also known as the Chinese gooseberry? It was only when New Zealanders saw its potential that it was given the name kiwi. The kiwi bird is the national symbol of New Zealand and the fruit itself is said to resemble it with its brown skin and funny shape.

It is not just a weird-looking fruit. It is also packed with nutrients that put many other fruits in the shade. Read on to discover the many benefits of kiwifruit.

1. Helps with weight loss

One medium kiwifruit contains only 57 calories per 100 grams, so it is an excellent daily addition to your fruit intake. As it also contains a high quantity of fiber (2.1 grams), this helps to make you feel full, so you may eat less. That is great news for weight watchers.

2. Relieves asthma in kids

An experiment involving 18,000 children in northern Italy showed that consuming kiwifruit can play a significant role in reducing asthma attacks. One group of children were given a few kiwifruit every day, while another group were given just one a week. The kids who ate the most kiwifruit found relief (25% to 44% less) from wheezing, nighttime coughing, and a runny nose.

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3. Increases your potassium intake

Potassium is one of the essential minerals involved in pumping your heart and keeping the nervous system healthy. Kiwifruit contains lots of potassium and beats bananas by virtue of a 50% lower calorie count. Just another easy way of warding off heart disease.

4. Protects your vision

Maintaining eye health is essential. Carrots are great but may be tough to chew, so why not take a few kiwifruit instead?

A study at the South Dakota State University has shown that as kiwifruit has plenty of lutein and zeaxanthin, it can play a vital role in helping to reduce the incidence of macular degeneration. This is an extremely common vision disorder from 65 years of age onwards.

5. Relieves constipation

If you suffer from constipation, the kiwifruit is an excellent laxative as its fiber content helps to keep bowel movements regular. Kiwis contain actinidine, which is a key to efficient digestion. Combine that with exercise and plenty of liquids to prevent constipation.

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6. Nourishes your skin

Another key element in this fruit is its plentiful supply of vitamins C and E. These are essential in helping you to regenerate new skin cells. If you are eating the right nutrients, your whole immune system will benefit. Your glowing skin will be a testimony to that.

7. Assists diabetes sufferers

The great thing about the kiwi is its low glycemic load, which makes it a good choice for those at risk of diabetes. In addition, it has only 14.6 grams of carbohydrates per 100 grams. Please note though, any fruit has to be taken in moderation when diabetes is present, so be sure to consult your doctor.

8. Reduces blood clots

A study at the University of Oslo in Norway showed that kiwifruit was just as effective as aspirin in helping to keep blood from clotting. No side effects either! They were able to show that consuming up to three kiwis a day was effective in preventing these dangerous clots. In fact, the incidence of clots was reduced by 18%.

9. Provides more than enough vitamin C

The kiwi is the king when it comes to vitamin C. It contains one and a half times the recommended daily dose! It even beats the orange (55 mg) as it contains 85–92 mg per 100 grams. It is therefore an essential weapon for keeping everything on track healthwise, such as:

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  • blood circulation
  • healthy bones
  • teeth
  • immune system.

10. Cancer prevention

It is fascinating to learn that the kiwifruit was used as a cancer prevention aid as far back as 700 BC in Asia.

The fact that the kiwi has such a high concentration of flavonoids and carotenoids means that it can have a powerful antioxidant function. This is crucial in keeping free radical activity at bay and also may help to protect DNA.

11. Provides folate

If you are thinking of starting a family, your doctor may recommend that mothers-to-be take more folate, as it has been shown to be an effective way of reducing birth defects. It also helps you to make red blood cells, which is really useful in preventing anemia. The amount of folate in a kiwi is about 10% of the daily recommended dose, which amounts to 17 micrograms. Other sources are dark leafy vegetables, beets, potatoes, and asparagus.

12. Sleep well!

Research reported in the Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows that people who took kiwifruit on a regular basis slept better and longer. Participants were given two kiwis before bedtime for a month. Results showed that the serotonin in the fruit helped the subjects get to sleep more quickly and alleviated sleep disorders.

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13. Reduces harmful cholesterol

One of the kiwifruit’s greatest benefits of all is that it helps to keep your cholesterol levels under control. Researchers at Massey University in New Zealand found that consumption of kiwifruit was a factor in helping to reduce harmful cholesterol. They believe that this is due, in part, to the high levels of polyphenols found in it.

As we have seen, there are innumerable health benefits in eating this great fruit. So the next time you go grocery shopping, why not give the ugly, humble kiwifruit a try?

Whatever you do though, don’t follow Erma Bombeck’s advice. She wrote: “Someone once threw me a small, brown, hairy kiwifruit, and I threw a wastebasket over it until it was dead.”

See also: Top 10 Most Nutrient-Rich Foods in the World

Featured photo credit: Kiwi/ Andreas Dantz via Flickr

More by this author

Robert Locke

Author of Ziger the Tiger Stories, a health enthusiast specializing in relationships, life improvement and mental health.

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Last Updated on November 5, 2020

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. A rut can manifest as a productivity vacuum and be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. Is it possible to learn how to get out of a rut?

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, or a student, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on Small Tasks

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks that have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate positive momentum, which I bring forward to my work.

If you have a large long-term goal you can’t wait to get started on, break it down into smaller objectives first. This will help each piece feel manageable and help you feel like you’re moving closer to your goal.

You can learn more about goals vs objectives here.

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2. Take a Break From Your Work Desk

When you want to learn how to get out of a rut, get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the bathroom, walk around the office, or go out and get a snack. According to research, your productivity is best when you work for 50 minutes to an hour and then take a 15-20 minute break[1].

Your mind may be too bogged down and will need some airing. By walking away from your computer, you may create extra space for new ideas that were hiding behind high stress levels.

3. Upgrade Yourself

Take the down time to upgrade your knowledge and skills. Go to a seminar, read up on a subject of interest, or start learning a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college[2]. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a Friend

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while. Relying on a support system is a great way to work on self-care when you’re learning how to get out of a rut.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget About Trying to Be Perfect

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies. Perfectionism can lead you to fear failure, which can ultimate hinder you even more if you’re trying to find motivation to work on something new.

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If you allow your perfectionism to fade, soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come, and then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

Learn more about How Not to Let Perfectionism Secretly Screw You Up.

6. Paint a Vision to Work Towards

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the ultimate goal or vision you have for your life?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action. You can use the power of visualization or even create a vision board if you like to have something to physically remind you of your goals.

7. Read a Book (or Blog)

The things we read are like food for our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great material.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. You can also stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs and follow writers who inspire and motivate you. Find something that interests you and start reading.

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8. Have a Quick Nap

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep[3].

Try a nap if you want to get out of a rut

    One Harvard study found that “whether they took long naps or short naps, participants showed significant improvement on three of the four tests in the study’s cognitive-assessment battery”[4].

    9. Remember Why You Are Doing This

    Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

    What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall your inspiration, and perhaps even journal about it to make it feel more tangible.

    10. Find Some Competition

    When we are learning how to get out of a rut, there’s nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

    Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, and networking conventions can all inspire you to get a move on. However, don’t let this throw you back into your perfectionist tendencies or low self-esteem.

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    11. Go Exercise

    Since you are not making headway at work, you might as well spend the time getting into shape and increasing dopamine levels. Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, or whatever type of exercise helps you start to feel better.

    As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

    If you need ideas for a quick workout, check out the video below:

    12. Take a Few Vacation Days

    If you are stuck in a rut, it’s usually a sign that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

    Beyond the quick tips above, arrange one or two days to take off from work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax, do your favorite activities, and spend time with family members. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

    Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest.

    More Tips to Help You Get out of a Rut

    Featured photo credit: Ashkan Forouzani via unsplash.com

    Reference

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