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12 Foods You Should Not Put In The Fridge

12 Foods You Should Not Put In The Fridge

Whilst we like to treat the fridge as a safe-haven for all things food and drink, there are, in fact, foods you should not put in the fridge. Which ones are you guilty of?
Putting these foods into the fridge won’t cause you any harm; however, it can certainly cause a nuisance for your palate as textures and tastes become ruined. To avoid removing the taste from your food, here are some foods you shouldn’t put into the fridge.

Oils

oil

    I’m not sure if this is classified as a food so much as a food ingredient, but nonetheless, putting oils into the fridge tends to turn them into a stodgy, almost butter-spread-like consistency. This is more common with olive and coconut oils, which tend to solidify at cooler temperatures and take a long time to become liquid again. (Hint: If you do make this mistake, put the oil into the microwave for a quick burst to get the consistency back).

    Coffee

    coffee

      In its ground or bean form, coffee should never be stored within the realms of your fridge. The trouble with coffee is that’s practically a sponge with smells around it, so if placed in the fridge, the coffee will begin to absorb any smell that’s in your fridge and the whole batch will never go back to it’s original arabica flavor.

      Another problem is that with the instant change of temperature, moisture begins to come off the coffee, which basically de-saturates the flavor right out of the bean.

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      Tomatoes

      tomatoes

        The biggest problem with storing tomatoes in the fridge is that the cold temperature begins to play havoc with the texture and makes the tomato mealy. Ever had a salad with that tomato that tasted mushy and practically had ice crystals inside it? Chances are those tomatoes have been in cold storage for a while.

        Onions

        onions

          Much like tomatoes, onions tend to become incredibly mushy or moldy if left in the fridge for too long. If the onion has been cut, then the layers begin the process of drying up even if you do wrap it up tightly. Also, cut onions tend to engulf the location it’s currently in with its smell, which is why a lot of wooden chopping boards make everything taste like onion after a while.

          Potatoes

          potatoes

            The cold temperature generally starts to break down the starch within potatoes; therefore, refrigerating it will leave you with a sweet or gritty potato, which rarely tastes good at this stage no matter what you do with it.

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            Bananas

            bananas

              Whether or not you refrigerate bananas actually comes down to what sort of ripeness you like with bananas, since the cold temperature within the fridge it tends to slow down the ripening process. Therefore, placing a green banana in your fridge will mean that it’ll pretty much stay green for an incredibly long time.

              On the other hand, if you have ripe bananas that are ready to be eaten, but no plans to do so, now is the time to put them in your fridge. The skin may turn black or brown, but the fruit inside will remain perfect.

              Honey

              honey

                Find a 1000 year old jar of honey, and it’ll be as fresh as the day it was put into that jar–honey a naturally preserved food. Putting honey into the fridge will increase the speed of the sugar crystallization which turns it into an almost dough-like form, making for a hard time to scoop out.

                Garlic

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                garlic

                  Garlic likes to go off pretty quickly in the fridge, it’ll grow mold and go rubbery-soft when put into the fridge. What makes it worse is that the look on the outside rarely changes, so you’ll never be able to tell until you decide to slice some up to fry up with your chili and prawns.

                  Melon

                  melons

                    It’s mostly advised to store any melon fruit in the fridge once it’s been cut open; however, until then, you should leave the fruit outside the fridge. There has been research to show that keeping melon out in room temperature will actually help with keeping the antioxidant levels intact.

                    Avocado

                    avocado

                      A lot of the times when you buy an avocado from the store, it’ll be solid, almost stone-hard; therefore, it’ll need a considerable amount of time to ripen properly and taste great! Putting the avocado in the fridge will just completely stop it from ripening–much like the banana, it practically freezes in time.

                      Breads

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                      bread

                        Breads don’t tend to do that well being stored in the fridge. The only time you should refrigerate bread is when it is in sandwich form, as it likes to go incredibly tough and chewy in the cold temperature. The cold temperature also promotes the bread to become stale far more quickly.

                        Fresh Herbs

                        herb

                          Unless you wrap them up tightly or put them in an air-tight container, you shouldn’t refrigerate your herbs. Fresh herbs are like coffee in that they love to absorb smells around them, making them impossible to return to the original flavor. They also like to lose flavor and go dry in the fridge quickly, so unless you plan to wrap them up, it’s wise to keep them outside in the open and away from strong odors.

                          Whilst this whole article screams of #firstworldproblems we are all globally responsible for 4 billion tons worth of food wastage per year–food that could have been eaten. If the US cut food wastage by just 5%, that will be enough to feed 4,000,000 Americans. Taking small precautionary measures to understand food storage and the best practices will not only cut down on waste, but it will also increase the amount of people being fed too.

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                          Last Updated on March 13, 2019

                          How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                          How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                          Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

                          You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

                          Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

                          1. Work on the small tasks.

                          When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

                          Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

                          2. Take a break from your work desk.

                          Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

                          Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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                          3. Upgrade yourself

                          Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

                          The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

                          4. Talk to a friend.

                          Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

                          Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

                          5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

                          If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

                          Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

                          Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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                          6. Paint a vision to work towards.

                          If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

                          Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

                          Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

                          7. Read a book (or blog).

                          The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

                          Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

                          Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

                          8. Have a quick nap.

                          If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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                          9. Remember why you are doing this.

                          Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

                          What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

                          10. Find some competition.

                          Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

                          Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

                          11. Go exercise.

                          Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

                          Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

                          As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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                          Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

                          12. Take a good break.

                          Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

                          Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

                          Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

                          Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

                          More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

                          Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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