Advertising
Advertising

A Powerful Mindhack That You Can Use to Study or Work Less in Your Leisure

A Powerful Mindhack That You Can Use to Study or Work Less in Your Leisure

What if I told you that you could have more fun, learn quicker, and become perceived as smarter by your peers by doing one simple thing consistently?

– You’d probably say:

“Ludvig, stop trying to sell me on quick-fixes, because there are none!”

And you’d be right for the majority of the time. But in this case you’d actually be wrong, because what I’m about to tell you actually works, and it costs nothing on your part except a few seconds of discomfort.

So, what is this unconventional tip that I speak of?

It is to get buy-in from yourself as soon as possible in any given situation.

Advertising

What is Buy-in?

To buy-in is to become immersed in something as a result of having invested time, resources, or thoughts into it. The more you buy into something the more innately interested you’ll be in it.

I still don’t get it. Give me some more concrete examples!

Right, try these on for size.

You have buy-in when you:

  • Watch several episodes of a TV series and find yourself liking it, expecting the next episode to be just as cool as the previous ones were.
  • Start regularly checking a blog or website for updates that aren’t related to the things you really should be doing.
  • Implicitly trust what someone else says without being critical of it.

You have bought into a thing when you’ve crossed the threshold of no longer doubting its usefulness or truthfulness.

As a result of having bought into something you are much more receptive and attentive to the thing or activity because your brain has now identified it as something that you are interested in.

Advertising

How to Use it to Your Advantage

Now that you know what the concept of buy-in means, you’re probably wondering:

What the !!?#  am I going to use this for?

You’re going to use it to become interested in things you probably wouldn’t be interested in otherwise.

Getting personal buy-in is a very powerful mindhack that you can use anytime you want, and it is particularly useful in class or at work.

Here’s how you’d do it: in order to trick yourself into becoming interested during class or at work, you need to do one very important thing:

‒ You need to ask a question or speak up in public. Even if you don’t initially feel like it.

Advertising

Actually, it is especially important that you do this when you feel bored or disinterested in the topic at hand. That’s when you really need to use this mindhack.

Personally, I use this trick all the time to get buy-in from myself. Over the past year I’ve seen some pretty good results in school despite not spending much time studying in my leisure.

The reason for this was because I’ve been very active during class, and the reason why I was always active in class was because I forced myself to abide by this one rule:

‒ I  always ask a question or make an assertion in front of everyone else within 10 minutes of starting. No exceptions.

Why Does it Work?

Seeing as how you’re reading posts on LifeHack, I figure you’re a person who definitely wants to know why getting yourself to buy into a thing works as efficiently as it does.

There are at least three major reasons for why this mindhack works:

Advertising

  1. By speaking up in front of a group of other people, you raise your adrenaline levels, which in turn infuses glucose into your bloodstream and makes you feel alert.
  2. When you ask a question or make an assertion, you are committing to the interaction. This makes your brain think “well, I wouldn’t have asked asked unless I was interested, so I guess I’m interested…” and as a result you suddenly feel interested. It works like magic every time!
  3. When you ask a question or make an assertion in front of other people, you are making yourself accountable, and because you will want to make sure that you do not screw up and lose face in front of other people, you will pay more attention to reduce the risk of that happening.

If you still don’t believe this could work due to how simple it is, I strongly suggest you try it out tomorrow at work in a meeting or in school during your next class.

Tell yourself you will speak up as soon as possible upon arrival.

It doesn’t matter the least what you say, only that you say something.

It might feel scary to do at first, but I promise you: the payout is very high in relation to the price of temporary discomfort that you have to pay.

What is better?

Sitting through the meeting or class feeling comfortable, but utterly bored‒or going through a couple of seconds of discomfort to become really interested for the remainder of the time?

More by this author

A Powerful Mindhack That You Can Use to Study or Work Less in Your Leisure 13 Highly Useful Free Programs and Websites That Any LifeHacker Must Try Are You Suffering From the Curse of Knowledge? Take These 12 Public Speaking Tips And Deliver An Impressive Speech Real World Examples of How Heuristics Have Been Used Against Us

Trending in Communication

1 How SMART Goal Setting Makes Lasting Changes in Your Life 2 10 Things Happy People Do Differently 3 4 Ways Physical Touch Helps Your Relationship 4 How to Deal with Anger and Better Control Your Emotions 5 How to Get Out of a Rut and Start Living the Life You Desire

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on February 13, 2019

10 Things Happy People Do Differently

10 Things Happy People Do Differently

Think being happy is something that happens as a result of luck, circumstance, having money, etc.? Think again.

Happiness is a mindset. And if you’re looking to improve your ability to find happiness, then check out these 10 things happy people do differently.

Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions. -Dalai Lama

1. Happy people find balance in their lives.

Folks who are happy have this in common: they’re content with what they have, and don’t waste a whole lot of time worrying and stressing over things they don’t. Unhappy people do the opposite: they spend too much time thinking about what they don’t have. Happy people lead balanced lives. This means they make time for all the things that are important to them, whether it’s family, friends, career, health, religion, etc.

Advertising

2. Happy people abide by the golden rule.

You know that saying you heard when you were a kid, “Do unto others as you would have them do to you.” Well, happy people truly embody this principle. They treat others with respect. They’re sensitive to the thoughts and feelings of other people. They’re compassionate. And they get treated this way (most of the time) in return.

3. Happy people don’t sweat the small stuff.

One of the biggest things happy people do differently compared to unhappy people is they let stuff go. Bad things happen to good people sometimes. Happy people realize this, are able to take things in stride, and move on. Unhappy people tend to dwell on minor inconveniences and issues, which can perpetuate feelings of sadness, guilt, resentment, greed, and anger.

4. Happy people take responsibility for their actions.

Happy people aren’t perfect, and they’re well aware of that. When they screw up, they admit it. They recognize their faults and work to improve on them. Unhappy people tend to blame others and always find an excuse why things aren’t going their way. Happy people, on the other hand, live by the mantra:

“There are two types of people in the world: those that do and those that make excuses why they don’t.”

5. Happy people surround themselves with other happy people.

happiness surrounding

    One defining characteristic of happy people is they tend to hang out with other happy people. Misery loves company, and unhappy people gravitate toward others who share their negative sentiments. If you’re struggling with a bout of sadness, depression, worry, or anger, spend more time with your happiest friends or family members. Chances are, you’ll find that their positive attitude rubs off on you.

    6. Happy people are honest with themselves and others.

    People who are happy often exhibit the virtues of honesty and trustworthiness. They would rather give you candid feedback, even when the truth hurts, and they expect the same in return. Happy people respect people who give them an honest opinion.

    7. Happy people show signs of happiness.

    Advertising

    smile

      This one may sound obvious but it’s a key differentiator between happy and unhappy people. Think about your happiest friends. Chances are, the mental image you form is of them smiling, laughing, and appearing genuinely happy. On the flip side, those who aren’t happy tend to look the part. Their posture may be slouched and you may perceive a lack of confidence.

      8. Happy people are passionate.

      Another thing happy people have in common is their ability to find their passions in life and pursue those passions to the fullest. Happy people have found what they’re looking for, and they spend their time doing what they love.

      9. Happy people see challenges as opportunities.

      Folks who are happy accept challenges and use them as opportunities to learn and grow. They turn negatives into positives and make the best out of seemingly bad situations. They don’t dwell on things that are out of their control; rather, they seek solutions and creative ways of overcoming obstacles.

      10. Happy people live in the present.

      While unhappy people tend to dwell on the past and worry about the future, happy people live in the moment. They are grateful for “the now” and focus their efforts on living life to the fullest in the present. Their philosophy is:

      Advertising

      There’s a reason it’s called “the present.” Because life is a gift.

      So if you’d like to bring a little more happiness into your life, think about the 10 principles above and how you can use them to make yourself better.

      Read Next