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Published on January 18, 2019

Best 5 Language Learning Apps to Easily Master a New Language

Best 5 Language Learning Apps to Easily Master a New Language

Learning a new language is no easy feat. While a language instructor is irreplaceable, language learning apps have come to revolutionize a lot of things and it has made language learning much easier. Compared to language learning websites, apps offer a more interactive experience to learn a new language.

The following language learning apps are the top recommended apps for your language learning needs:

1. Duolingo

    Duolingo is a very successful app that merged gamification and language learning. According to Expanded Ramblings, the app now counts with 300 million users.

    Duolingo offers a unique concept, an easy-to-use app and is a great app to accompany your language acquisition journey. The courses are created by native speakers, so this is not data or algorithm-based.

    The app is free and has the upgrade options with Duolingo Plus for $9.99, which are add free lessons. The mobile app offers 25 languages and is popular for English-speaking learners learning other languages.

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    Download the app

    2. HelloTalk

      HelloTalk aims to facilitate speaking practice and eliminate the stresses of a real-time and life conversation. The app allows users to connect to native speakers and has a WhatsApp like chat that imitates its interface.

      There is a perk to this app. The same native speakers available also want to make an even exchange and learn your target language, so engagement is the name of the game.

      What’s more, the app has integrated translation function that bypasses the difficulties of sending a message with a missing word and instead fills in the gap.

      Download the app

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      3. Mindsnacks

        Remember that Duolingo has integrated gamification in language learning? Well, Mindsnacks takes the concept to another level. There is an extensive list of languages available within the app comes with eight to nine games designed to learn grammar, vocabulary listening.

        You will also be able to visualize your progress since the app integrates monitoring capabilities. The layout and interface is nothing short of enjoyable, cheerful and charming.

        Download the app

        4. Busuu

          Bussu is a social language learning app. It is available on the web, Android, and iOS. It currently supports 12 languages and is free.

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          The functionality allows users to learn words, simple dialogues and questions related to the conversations. In addition, the dialogues are recorded by native speakers, which brings you close to the language learning experience.

          When you upgrade, you unlock important features including course materials. The subscription is $17 a month.

          Download the app

          5. Babbel

            Babbel is a subscription-based service founded in 2008. According to LinguaLift, it is a paid cousing of Duolingo. The free version comes with 40 classes, and does not require you to invest any money.

            Each of the classes starts with with a sequential teaching of vocabulary with the help of pictures. The courses are tailor made and adapted to the students’ level, allowing the learning to be adjusted accordingly.

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            If you started learning a language and stopped, Babbel will help you pick up where you started.

            Download the app

            Takeaways

            All the apps recommended are tailored for different needs, whether you’re beginning to learn a language or trying to pick back up one. All of them are designed by real-life native speakers and so provide you with a more concrete learning experience.

            Since these apps are designed to adapt to different kinds of learning styles, do check out which one is the most suitable for you.

            Featured photo credit: Yura Fresh via unsplash.com

            More by this author

            Anthony Carranza

            Multilingual writer and journalist covering all things technology and productivity.

            Top 5 Spending Tracker Apps to Manage Your Budget Smart in 2019 10 Smartest Productivity Software to Improve Your Work Performance Best 5 Language Learning Apps to Easily Master a New Language How to Start an Online Business That Will Grow and Succeed 11 Google Chrome Apps and Features to Help You Get More Done with Less Effort

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            1 How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples) 2 How to Set Stretch Goals and Keep Your Team Motivated 3 10 Essential Soft Skills That Will Help Advance Your Career 4 How to Make Going Back to School at 30 Possible (And Meaningful) 5 The Savvy Employees Guide to Asking for a Raise

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            Last Updated on April 25, 2019

            How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

            How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

            Shifting careers, tiny or big, can be paralyzing. Whether your desire for a career change is self-driven or involuntary, you can manage the panic and fear by understanding ‘why’ you are making the change.

            Your ability to clearly and confidently articulate your transferable skills makes it easier for employers to understand how you are best suited for the job or industry.

            A well written career change resume that shows you have read the job description and markets your transferable skills can increase your success for a career change.

            3 Steps to Prepare Your Mind Before Working on the Resume

            Step 1: Know Your ‘Why’

            Career changes can be an unnerving experience. However, you can lessen the stress by making informed decisions through research.

            One of the best ways to do this is by conducting informational interviews.[1] Invest time to gather information from diverse sources. Speaking to people in the career or industry that you’re pursuing will help you get clarity and check your assumptions.

            Here are some questions to help you get clear on your career change:

            • What’s your ideal work environment?
            • What’s most important to you right now?
            • What type of people do you like to work with?
            • What are the work skills that you enjoy doing the most?
            • What do you like to do so much that you lose track of time?
            • Whose career inspires you? What is it about his/her career that you admire?
            • What do you dislike about your current role and work environment?

            Step 2: Get Clear on What Your Transferable Skills Are[2]

            The data gathered from your research and informational interviews will give you a clear picture of the career change that you want. There will likely be a gap between your current experience and the experience required for your desired job. This is your chance to tell your personal story and make it easy for recruiters to understand the logic behind your career change.

            Make a list and describe your existing skills and experience. Ask yourself:

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            What experience do you have that is relevant to the new job or industry?

            Include any experience e.g., work, community, volunteer, or helping a neighbour. The key here is ANY relevant experience. Don’t be afraid to list any tasks that may seem minor to you right now. Remember this is about showcasing the fact that you have experience in the new area of work.

            What will the hiring manager care about and how can you demonstrate this?

            Based on your research you’ll have an idea of what you’ll be doing in the new job or industry. Be specific and show how your existing experience and skills make you the best candidate for the job. Hiring managers will likely scan your resume in less than 7 seconds. Make it easy for them to see the connection between your skills and the skills that are needed.

            Clearly identifying your transferable skills and explaining the rationale for your career change shows the employer that you are making a serious and informed decision about your transition.

            Step 3: Read the Job Posting

            Each job application will be different even if they are for similar roles. Companies use different language to describe how they conduct business. For example, some companies use words like ‘systems’ while other companies use ‘processes’.

            When you review the job description, pay attention to the sections that describe WHAT you’ll be doing and the qualifications/skills. Take note of the type of language and words that the employer uses. You’ll want to use similar language in your resume to show that your experience meets their needs.

            5 Key Sections on Your Career Change Resume (Example)

            The content of the examples presented below are tailored for a high school educator who wants to change careers to become a client engagement manager, however, you can easily use the same structure for your career change resume.

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            Don’t forget to write a well crafted cover letter for your career change to match your updated resume. Your career change cover letter will provide the context and personal story that you’re not able to show in a resume.

            1. Contact Information and Header

            Create your own letterhead that includes your contact information. Remember to hyperlink your email and LinkedIn profile. Again, make it easy for the recruiter to contact you and learn more about you.

            Example:

            Jill Young

            Toronto, ON | [email protected] | 416.222.2222 | LinkedIn Profile

            2. Qualification Highlights or Summary

            This is the first section that recruiters will see to determine if you meet the qualifications for the job. Use the language from the job posting combined with your transferable skills to show that you are qualified for the role.

            Keep this section concise and use 3 to 4 bullets. Be specific and focus on the qualifications needed for the specific job that you’re applying to. This section should be tailored for each job application. What makes you qualified for the role?

            Example:

            Qualifications Summary

            • Experienced managing multiple stakeholder interests by building a strong network of relationships to support a variety of programs
            • Experienced at resolving problems in a timely and diplomatic manner
            • Ability to work with diverse groups and ensure collaboration while meeting tight timelines

            3. Work Experience

            Only present experiences that are relevant to the job posting. Focus on your specific transferable skills and how they apply to the new role.

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            How this section is structured will depend on your experience and the type of career change you are making.

            For example, if you are changing industries you may want to list your roles before the company name. However, if you want to highlight some of the big companies you’ve worked with then you may want to list the company name first. Just make sure that you are consistent throughout your resume.

            Be clear and concise. Use 1 to 4 bullets to highlight your relevant work experiences for each job you list on your resume. Ensure that the information demonstrates your qualifications for the new job. Remember to align all the dates on your resume to the right margin.

            Example:

            Work Experience

            Theater Production Manager 2018 – present

            YourLocalTheater

            • Collaborated with diverse groups of people to ensure a successful production while meeting tight timelines

            4. Education

            List your formal education in this section. For example, the name of the degrees you received and the school who issued it. To eliminate biases, I would recommend removing the year you graduated.

            Example:

            Education

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            • Bachelor of Education, University of Western Ontario
            • Bachelor of Theater Studies with Honors, University of British Columbia

            5. Other Activities or Interests

            When you took an inventory of your transferable skills, what experiences were relevant to your new career path (that may not fit in the other resume sections?).

            Example:

            Other Activities

            • Mentor, Pathways to Education
            • Volunteer lead for coordinating all community festival vendors

            Bonus Tips

            Remember these core resume tips to help you effectively showcase your transferable skills:

            • CAR (Context Action Result) method. Remember that each bullet on your resume needs to state the situation, the action you took and the result of your experience.
            • Font. Use modern Sans Serif fonts like Tahoma, Verdana, or Arial.
            • White space. Ensure that there is enough white space on your resume by adjusting your margins to a minimum of 1.5 cm. Your resume should be no more than two pages long.
            • Tailor your resume for each job posting. Pay attention to the language and key words used on the job posting and adjust your resume accordingly. Make the application process easy on yourself by creating your own resume template. Highlight sections that you need to tailor for each job application.
            • Get someone else to review your resume. Ideally you’d want to have someone with industry or hiring experience to provide you with insights to hone your resume. However, you also want to have someone proofread your resume for grammar and spelling errors.

            The Bottom Line

            It’s essential that you know why you want to change careers. Setting this foundation not only helps you with your resume, but can also help you to change your cover letter, adjust your LinkedIn profile, network during your job search, and during interviews.

            Ensure that all the content on your resume is relevant for the specific job you’re applying to.

            Remember to focus on the job posting and your transferable skills. You have a wealth of experience to draw from – don’t discount any of it! It’s time to showcase and brand yourself in the direction you’re moving towards!

            More Resources to Help You Change Career Swiftly

            Featured photo credit: Parker Byrd via unsplash.com

            Reference

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