Advertising
Advertising

9 Free Language Learning Online Methods You Can’t Miss!

9 Free Language Learning Online Methods You Can’t Miss!

Learning a second language has all kinds of benefits. If you travel, you’ll be able to talk to people in places that you travel. Studies have shown that learning a second language helps your brain work better. It’s even fun learning a second language with your friends or significant other so you can communicate among yourselves. Here are some free tools you can use to learn a second language.

1. Duolingo

free language learning online

    Pros:
    • Totally free resource.
    • Support for the big languages (German, Spanish, French) along with some others.
    • Full-featured mobile apps on iOS and Android so you can learn on the go.
    • You can sign up and log in using Facebook and Google+ which makes it easy to just jump in and go.

    Cons:

    • Not as comprehensive as others.
    • If you’re looking for stuff like Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Farsi, Hindi, and others, you’ll need to look elsewhere.

    Special Features: A full mobile experience lets you use this on a tablet or phone for on-the-go learning. The learning experience is formatted to be like a game to help make the learning process more fun. To try out Duolingo, go to their website.

    2. Busuu

    Advertising

    free language learning online

      Pros:
      • Free features include study options for reading, writing, and speaking.
      • Free languages include Chinese and Russian along with many others including the usual ones.
      • You can sign up and log in with Facebook and Google+.
      • Mobile apps available for Android and iOS for learning on the go.

      Cons:

      • You don’t get everything in the free version. You must pay to get grammar worksheets and an official certificate of completion.
      • Still missing big languages, including pretty much all Middle Eastern languages.

      Special features: The mobile apps are a nice touch and both of them are rated fairly well on their respective platforms. More languages than most. It allows you to set goals so you can work toward them instead of being free form like others. If you want to try it out, check out the official website.

      3. Foreign Services Institute

      free language learning online

        Pros:
        • Supports a metric ton of languages including African and Middle Eastern tongues.
        • Courses are crafted by professional linguists so they are extremely comprehensive.
        • Audio recordings available for listening.
        • Study materials are PDFs and downloaded audio files which means learning offline is easy and you can put these materials on any smartphone, tablet, laptop, etc and learn from anywhere online or offline.

        Cons:

        • All the lessons are in PDF format and (slightly fuzzy) audio files. There are no fancy graphics, goals, mobile apps, or other features.
        • Lesson plans focus on repetition and some people don’t learn well that way.

        Special features: This is professional learning materials and among the most comprehensive available for free. The PDF format and (slightly fuzzy) audio files are a tad primitive but their portability is unmatched anywhere. This is for serious learners. If you want to check it out, go to FSI’s official website.

        Advertising

        4. Livemocha

        free language learning online

          Pros:
          • Uses a unique “live learning” technique where learners can observe and learn rather than the usual learning style of repetition and lessons. Don’t worry, they still have classic lessons too.
          • Live instructor-led classes is something unique on this list.
          • You can meet other people learning the same language you are and you can become study buddies, thus adding a social aspect.
          • A doubly unique system allows you to register using your native language. You then grade the work of other people who are learning that language. This allows you to earn points. You use points to unlock more lesson plans. Thus, you must give to get and help others learn in order to learn. Awesome!

          Cons:

          • It’s very social so if you don’t want a social learning environment then this isn’t for you.
          • It’s very possible to run out of points before you purchase your next lesson and you may have to grind to get enough for the next lesson.
          • People who don’t care and don’t want to take it seriously will probably give good greats just to get points quickly. If you don’t plan to commit, you shouldn’t join.

          Special features: The give-and-get dynamic is something truly special here. Help others learn and others will help you learn! Still has the traditional lessons as a base line. Live instructors are essential. If you want to check it out, look at the LiveMocha’s website.

          5. Memrise

          free language learning online

            Pros:
            • Uses “mems” which are essentially mnemonic flash cards to help you learn new vocabulary based on the vocabulary you already know.
            • Facebook log in makes it easy to start up and get started.
            • Community generated which means the content is ever increasing.
            • Great for visual learners!

            Cons:

            Advertising

            • May not be comprehensive enough for advanced learners.
            • The mem cards and courses are user generated which means the quality varies.

            Special features: The community driven nature of this method means there are new things to learn all the time. The mem cards are unique and offer a much more visually stimulating way to learn.

            6. Internet Polyglot

            free language learning online

              Pros:
              • Flash card style lessons are great for visual learners.
              • You can actually use this without signing up for anything for a while but signing up for an account is easy.
              • Mobile apps let you learn on the fly.
              • Support for a lot of languages.

              Cons:

              • Not very comprehensive so serious learners will need additional tools.
              • The mobile apps haven’t been updated in over a year so if they don’t work for you, you’re out of luck.
              • The website lacks the polish of these other websites.

              Special features: Very simple flash card games are great if you only have a few minutes to learn stuff. Even if they are old, the mobile apps are present and if they work, they’re alright. If you’re up for trying it out, check out the official website.

              7. Lang-8

              Advertising

              free language learning online

                Pros:
                • Like Livemocha, Lang-8 is social based where other people grade and help you learn while you grade and help other people learn.
                • You keep a journal of the stuff you learn which is a fun way to look back and see how far you’ve come.
                • Unlike most sites, this focuses more on written language. The stuff you post is reviewed by people who speak the language and they correct your errors so you learn.

                Cons:

                • This is for people who either already speak the language or have other tools that are teaching them. Lang-8 itself doesn’t actually have things like lesson plans or anything like that. It’s more of a trial-by-fire type of learning.
                • Signing up for an account is liking signing up for a social media account. It’s very tedious.
                • No speaking tutorials at all.

                Special features: The social media aspect is actually quite fascinating. You post things in your native language and speakers of other languages will correct it so that it reads the same thing in another language. This is an amazing tool for learning sentence structure and how to write in other languages. To check it out, head to the official website.

                8. Anki

                free language learning online

                  Pros:
                  • Downloaded and installed on the computer rather than a web interface so it works offline.
                  • It’s cross platform and you can sync your cards across multiple devices which is nice.
                  • It’s actually not just for languages. You can create custom flash card sets to learn anything from math to people’s faces. The sky is the limit.
                  • Can reportedly handle flash card decks with over 100,000 flash cards. That means you can learn pretty much anything except counting to 100,001.
                  • Supports images, audio, and video flash cards.

                  Cons:

                  • They’re flash cards which means memorization. If you’re not good with that kind of learning then you probably won’t find this much help.
                  • If the language you want to learn isn’t supported, you’ll have to create your own custom flash card set which can be tedious but it’ll help you learn the language better!

                  Special features: This is the best flash card system out there. It’s been around for years, is highly optimized, cross-platform, and you can use it for things other than learning a language. It’s tried and true and that’s what counts! Check out their official website for more details.

                  Like we said earlier, there are so many benefits for your brain and memory and you’ll be able to talk and interact with a whole new culture of people. There’s nothing left to do but pick your poison, dig in, and get started. N’attendez pas commencer!

                  Featured photo credit: Meme Generator via 4.bp.blogspot.com

                  More by this author

                  Joseph Hindy

                  A writer, editor, and YouTuber who likes to share about technology and lifestyle tips.

                  10 Benefits of Sleeping Naked You Probably Didn’t Know 12 Inspirational Speeches That Teach You the Most Valuable Life Lessons 15 Most Effective Cool Down Exercises For Every Workout 10 Things Guys Love That You Didn’t Expect 20 Google Search Tips to Use Google More Efficiently

                  Trending in Technology

                  1 7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively 2 7 Clever Goal Tracker Apps to Make the Most of Your Business in 2019 3 10 Smartest Productivity Software to Improve Your Work Performance 4 18 Best Time Management Apps and Tools (2019 Updated) 5 16 Less Known Gmail Hacks That Will Super Boost Your Productivity

                  Read Next

                  Advertising
                  Advertising
                  Advertising

                  Last Updated on February 15, 2019

                  7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

                  7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

                  Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

                  Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

                  Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

                  So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

                  Joe’s Goals

                  Advertising

                     

                    Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

                    Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

                    Daytum

                      Daytum

                      is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

                      Advertising

                      Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

                      Excel or Numbers

                        If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

                        What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

                        Evernote

                        Advertising

                          I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

                          Evernote is free with a premium version available.

                          Access or Bento

                            If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                            Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

                            Advertising

                            You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                            Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                            All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                            Conclusion

                            I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                            What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

                            Read Next