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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

How to Increase Brain Power, Boost Memory and Become 10X Smarter

How to Increase Brain Power, Boost Memory and Become 10X Smarter

Have you ever relied on a mental grocery list, only to forget one or two items after you’ve left the supermarket? Or what about an idea or thought that came to mind while you were making your way to work, and you tell yourself you’ll write it down once you reach the office, only to forget about it soon after?

Our memory, no matter our age, will fail us every now and then. Whether it’s trying to recall something quickly, or remember something long term, we will encounter memory blanks or slips.

Sometimes, when we have too much information to absorb, we go through what is called memory overload, and that also causes our minds to go into a blank, or we’re simply not able to grasp more information. That’s why your teachers will advise against cramming for exams at the last minute!

So how to increase brain power, improve your memory and become smarter? I’ll reveal the secret to this in a minute.

The Harsh Truth About the Human Brain

If you’re looking for ways on how to train your brain to boost memory, this is something you should know:

The reality is, our human mind was never made to memorize, store or recall a ton of information.

Back in the Stone Age, our brain was designed to process the environment around us and to anticipate danger around us. It was all about survival then: hunting for food, finding for shelter and safety away from harm and danger.

Over time, with developments and discoveries, our brains had to develop and get accustomed to what is around us. The amount of information we now have access to has grown exponentially over the Ages.

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Now, in the Age of Information, the cost of getting new info is so low that it happens right at your fingertips–resulting in information explosion!

Since we have the capability of info at our fingertips, the amount of information we have to process is ever-increasing. As technology has advanced, we now have to perform more complicated tasks, which require us to quickly retrieve information from our memory (writing, operating a relatively complicated tool, delayed information such as trading goods, signing contracts, etc.).

These days, our brains are less like survival organs and more like pattern recognition machines. They are now required to process enormous amounts of information, to make decisions, and to make connections amongst a myriad of information.

The Brain’s New Challenge

With this change comes new limitations to our brains. Because we have limited brain capacity, the amount of information grows so much that everything just passes through our mind without solid retention (Information overload), and we can’t tell what is useful or not.

We’re facing an unprecedented number of tasks to handle on a daily basis–resulting in mental energy that has to be distributed among many different things at once.

When it comes to memorizing, decision making or learning a new skill, which is more valuable to you? Which skills would you rather improve and build on?

How to Upgrade Your Brain

Here is where I’m going to help you to upgrade your brain. Yes, that’s right.

Like a personal assistant or secretary, I’m going to show you how you can boost brain power and give your brain an aid that will help you to effortlessly sort through all the information that comes to you on a daily basis.

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This brilliant aid is called the Digital Brain.

In contrast to a human brain, computers are great at storing information. It’s reliable (thanks to cloud computing), accurate, and extremely detailed.

From a computing perspective, memory involves three key elements:

  1. Recording — storing the information
  2. Organization — archiving it in a logical manner
  3. Recall — retrieving it again when you need it

Like a computer, having a Digital Brain will work in the same way as this memory framework to manage how information flows into and out of your brain.

Here’s an example:

When setting up a new account on a website, due to strict security settings, many sites require you to come up with complicated passwords with special characters that you don’t usually use.

As a result, you now have to memorize this new password (Record), associate it with the other passwords that’s stored in your brain (Organize), and enter that password the next time you log in (Recall).

Even in this simple example, there are several parts in the process which will make it all too easy to forget. Because this new password is unique, we have a hard time recognizing it with our regular patterns. And if we don’t use the password everyday, it’s easy to forget it after a few days. One day you’ll try to recall the password but enter the incorrect one over and over again.

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Sound familiar? It’s one of the most common things that happen.

Is it because the information is complicated? Nope. A password is just a bunch of characters, numbers, and symbols.

It happens because our brains are not made to memorize. With a Digital Brain, you can delegate it to do the heavy lifting.  

Making Room for Learning and Creativity

Many people get confused with storing versus learning in this Digital Age.

Learning requires spaced repetition, applying different learning models and then applying those skills. Whereas storing means having information in a ‘library’.

When you go to a library, you borrow a book to find a specific piece of information. When you’re done with it, you put it back. With a Digital Brain, this becomes your personal library of knowledge.

With your brain now freed up from having to store information, it can focus on more crucial aspects like learning, decision making, problem solving and making meaning out of all the incoming information.

Wouldn’t this be much easier for you to get things done on a daily basis? Whether it be something as trivial as getting your groceries, or something more complex like planning out what’s needed for a project you’re working on. Your Digital Brain will help you effortlessly organize it.

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Here at Lifehack, we’ll teach you how to set up a system to record, organize and recall information effortlessly. You’ll also learn how to build a habit to rely on your Digital Brain like second nature, all in a step by step manner.

A Digital Brain for Everyone (No Matter How Old You Are)

I’m sure some of you might be wondering if this is really for you. You may be well into your 50’s or 60’s, and going digital isn’t something you’re keen to keep up with.

Well, the good news is that having a Digital Brain isn’t reserved for Millennials or the younger generation. There are many layers to the Digital Brain, and the interesting thing is that it’s constantly upgrading according to new advances in technology.

So, you get to pick how much of a Digital Brain you want to adopt into your existing lifestyle. Age need not be a barrier when it comes to adopting a Digital Brain! 

At Lifehack, we’ll go over how to make the most of your Digital Brain, along with the Breakthrough Framework that will compliment and enhance your way of seeing and doing things. 

How can this whole Framework help you? Learn more about it here: Start Living Your Life Above Limitations

Featured photo credit: Priscilla Du Preez via unsplash.com

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Leon Ho

Founder & CEO of Lifehack

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Last Updated on June 18, 2019

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder That Works)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder That Works)

No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Making Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

More About Habits

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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