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Do You Work More When You’re Happy but Less When You’re Sad? 10X Winners Don’t

Do You Work More When You’re Happy but Less When You’re Sad? 10X Winners Don’t

Nearly 100 years ago, two legendary explorers, two great rivals Robert Falcon Scott, and Roald Amundsen and their teams, raced to be the first to reach the South Pole.[1] As they marched, neither knew the other’s progress, but marched on with incredible strength and tenacity. The two men were very different, Scott a military man, traditional and professional; Amundesen, a stone cold arctic explorer who sought to be the first to reach the pole at any cost.

    In the end, it was Amundsen who got there first, Scott arriving a couple of days after. Amundsen turned and headed back, his journey home was largely without incident. Scott and his men, tragically, perished on the return.[2]

    Scott was an experienced navigator and explorer long before the south pole expedition. So why did Amundsen arrive days before Scott? What made Amundsen arrived first was his determination, tenacity, and his superior planning.

    It is a story I have long been fascinated by. The sheer drama and heroism of it is incredible. Yet, thinking about it now, I realize that there is so much that can be learned by it, not just about exploration, or history, but in any great undertaking, no matter what it is.

    The story is proof of the success of consistent progress, and something the writer Jim Collins calls the 20 Mile March. Where, he says, the key to success in something doesn’t lie in some natural ability or an individual’s personality, but consistent progress at all times.

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    The 20 Mile March

      On the south pole exhibition, Scott intended to do two things: 1) reach the South Pole before anyone else and 2) conduct research and study the South Pole

      Whereas Amundsen intended to only reach the South Pole before anyone else.

      While Scott and his team were researching and studying, Amundsen was constantly on the move, constantly heading towards the pole. Sure, there may have been days where Scott and his men moved many miles further than Amundsen and his team had that day. But Amundsen’s perseverance kept him moving ever onward.

        The story is proof of the success of progressive, consistent progress — marching for 20 miles no matter what condition.

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        Make the most of the 20 Mile March

          Breaking down the 20 mile march idea, it is possible to see seven steps that you must undertake in order to benefit the most. These are:

          1. Set performance markers

          Before you start on something, the first thing you should do is set a minimum acceptable level of success. Having a minimum acceptable standard forces you to push yourself in a kind of productive level of discomfort.

          It’s like the classic fable of the hare and the tortoise, the reason the hare ultimately lost the race is because he thought he needed to rest when he didn’t, he didn’t establish an acceptable level standard, and as such he lost to an opponent that was significantly slower than him.

          2. Set up constraints, so you don’t push yourself too much

          At the same time, it is just as important to set a constraint so you don’t push yourself too much and then burn out before you reach your goal.

          This is encapsulated by the term “20 mile march”, in good conditions, and on a good surface, a person in good shape can cover 20 miles in roughly 6-7 hours. This amount pushes you, and it can be hard to maintain. At the same time, this 6-7 hours will afford you enough time to rest so you can continue the same pace the day after.

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          3. Ensure that your plan is tailored around you and the task at hand

          Nothing worth doing is done easily, but to maximize your chance of success in a task or undertaking it is important to know not only your own strengths and weaknesses, but also the capabilities of those with you, for example your team mates, and to use this knowledge for your advantage.

          Adapt your plan around everything and you could have the most effective, and most skilled team in the world. But if your plan revolves around someone being able to do something they can’t, then it’s a bad plan.

          Even if you don’t have a team, the same rule applies. After all there is no point in setting yourself for a 20 mile march if you can’t walk.

          4. Ensure that you’re independent from outside forces

          Make sure your goals aren’t influenced by outside forces or influences. Another reason why Scott came second, and perhaps even why his expedition had such a tragic outcome, is because scientific groups at home were interested in research he was able to collect and any studies he was able to undertake. This made his mission more difficult and slowed him down.

          Only you know best about your skills and abilities, and whatever your task is, remember that you will be the one undertaking it, as such, be the boss of it. Any decisions you make along the way or any limitations you put in place along the way will be far more useful and effective than decisions made from outside, this is for one simple reason you will be working from knowledge of the situation, and they will not.

          5. Take control

          This is a similar point to above. But it could prove to be unwise to leave your success in your endeavor up to the actions of others, even if that person is trustworthy and dependable, it is possible that something could happen which will leave the other person unable to fulfill their role in the plan, leaving you stuck, and unable to achieve your goal even if you are ready for it.

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          6. Have a time frame

          As the first two points say, the right time frame is key, too short, then you risk pushing yourself too hard, being open to too much risk, or simply running out of time. Too long, then you risk ceasing to push yourself at all, risking the whole operation.

          7. Be consistent

          This last piece of advice is by far the most important. To succeed in anything, you need to keep moving forward, relentlessly and with consistency. It is inevitable that unexpected things will happen along the way, you may be moving into things you didn’t expect or plan for.

          Returning to Amundsen and Scott, nobody had made it to the South Pole before, nobody knew what to expect. But if you operate with self control, with knowledge and careful thought, then none of it will matter.

          Talent is overrated. The key to success doesn’t lie in any natural ability, but consistent progress at all times. Set yourself a clear goal, stick to your plan and make consistent progress and you’re getting closer to your goal every day.

          Reference

          More by this author

          Leon Ho

          Founder & CEO of Lifehack

          What Is Creativity? We All Have It, and Need It Easily Distracted? Here’s How to Regain Your Focus How to Stay Focused at Work by Using Deep Work What are Goals? Achieve More By Changing Your Perspectives 17 Ways To Develop a Growth Mindset

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          Last Updated on January 21, 2020

          What Is Creativity? We All Have It, and Need It

          What Is Creativity? We All Have It, and Need It

          Do you think of yourself as a creative person? Do you play the drums or do watercolor paintings? Perhaps compose songs or direct plays? Can you even relate to any of these so called ‘creative’ experiences? Growing up, did you ever have that ‘artistic’ sibling or friend who excelled in drawing, playing instruments or literature? And you maybe wondered why you can’t even compose a birthday card greeting–or that drawing stick figures is the furthest you’ll ever get to drawing a family portrait. Many people have this common assumption that creativity is an inborn talent; only a special group of people are inherently creative, and everyone else just unfortunately does not have that special ability. You either have that creative flair or instinct, or you don’t. But, this is far from the truth! So what is creativity?

          Can I Be Creative?

          The fact is, that everyone has an innate creative ability. Despite what most people may think, creativity is a skill that everyone can learn and hone on. It’s a skill with huge leverage that allows you to generate enormous amounts of value from relatively little input. How is that so? You’ll have to start by expanding your definition of creativity. Ironically, you have to be creative and ‘think out of the box’ with the definition! Creativity at its heart, is being able to see things in a way that others cannot. It’s a skill that helps you find new perspectives to create new possibilities and solutions to different problems. So, if you encounter different challenges and problems that need solving on a regular basis, then creativity is an invaluable skill to have.Let’s say, for example, that you work in sales. Having creativity will help you to look for new ways to approach and reach out to potential customers. Or perhaps you’re a teacher. In this role you have to constantly look for new ways to deliver your message and educate your students.

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          How Creativity Works

          Let me break another misconception about creativity, which is that it’s only used to create completely “new” or “original” things. Again, this is far from the truth. Because nothing is ever completely new or original. Everything, including works of art, doesn’t come from nothing. Everything derives from some sort of inspiration. That means that creativity works by connecting things together in order to derive new meaning or value.From this perspective, you can see a lot of creativity in action. In technology, Apple combines traditional computers with design and aesthetics to create new ways to use digital products. In music, a musician may be inspired by various styles of music, instruments and rhythms to create an entirely new type of song. All of these examples are about connecting different ideas, finding common ground amongst the differences, and creating a completely new idea out of them.

          What Really Is Creativity?

          Creativity Needs an Intention

          Another misconception about the creative process is that you can just be in a general “creative” state. Real creativity isn’t about coming up with “eureka!” moments for random ideas. Instead, to be truly creative, you need to have a direction. You have to ask yourself this question: “What problem am I trying to solve?” Only by knowing the answer to this question can you start flexing your creativity muscles. Often times, the idea of creativity is associated with the ‘Right’ brain, with intuition and imagination. Hence a lot of focus is placed on the ‘Right’ brain when it comes to creativity. But, to get the most out of creativity, you need to utilize both sides of your brain–Right and Left–which means using the analytical and logical part of your brain, too. This may sound surprising to you, but creativity has a lot to do with problem solving. And, problem solving inherently involves logic and analysis. So instead of throwing out the ‘Left’ brain, full creativity needs them to work in unison. For example, when you’re looking for new ideas, your ‘Left’ brain will guide you to a place of focus, which is based on your objective behind the ideas you’re searching for. The ‘Right’ brain then guides you to gather and explore based on your current focus. And when you decide to try out these new ideas, your ‘Right’ brain will give you novel solutions outside of the ones you already know. Your ‘Left’ brain then helps you evaluate and tune the solutions to work better in practice. So, logic and creativity actually work hand in hand, and not one at the expense of the other.

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          Creativity Is a Skill

          At the end of the day, creativity is a skill. It’s not some innate or natural born talent that some have over others. What this means is that creativity and innovation can be practiced and improved upon systematically.A skill can be learned and practiced by applying your strongest learning styles. Want to know what your learning style is? Try this test. A skill can be measured and improved through a Feedback Loop, and can be continuously upgraded over time by regular practice. Through regular practice, your creativity goes through different stages of proficiency. This means that you can become more and more creative! If you never thought that creativity was relevant to you, or that you don’t have a knack for being creative… think again! You can use creativity in any aspect of your life. In fact you should use it, as it will allow you to to break through your usual loop, get you out of your comfort zone, and inspire you to grow and try new things. Creativity will definitely give you an edge when you’re trying to solve a problem or come up with new solutions.

          Start Connecting the Dots

          Excited to start honing your creativity? Here at Lifehack, we’ve got a wealth of knowledge to help you get started. We understand that creativity is a matter of connecting things together in order to derive new meaning or value. So, if you want to learn how to start connecting the dots, check out these tips:

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          Featured photo credit: rawpixel via unsplash.com

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