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Stop Eating So Much Salt! These Are The Low Sodium Foods That You Should Eat!

Stop Eating So Much Salt! These Are The Low Sodium Foods That You Should Eat!

Despite the growing number of warnings by the health experts, our diet is still abundant with processed foods that contain excessive amounts of salt that is detrimental to our health. What too much sodium does to our health is that it increases the volume of blood in our blood stream, which results in high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, heart failure, stomach cancer, osteoporosis, kidney stones and headaches[1], not to mention the weight gain and bloating as a result of water retention. With high blood pressure being a leading cause of cardiovascular disease, it has become evident that lower sodium intake is one of the most important prevention measures.

High sodium foods we use in our diet include

  • Smoked, cured, salted or canned meat, fish or poultry including bacon, cold cuts, ham, frankfurters, sausage, sardines, caviar and anchovies
  • Frozen breaded meats and dinners, such as burritos and pizza
  • Canned entrees, such as ravioli, spam and chili
  • Salted nuts
  • Beans canned with salt added
  • Buttermilk
  • Regular and processed cheese, cheese spreads and sauces
  • Cottage cheese
  • Bread and rolls with salted tops
  • Quick breads, self-rising flour, biscuit, pancake and waffle mixes
  • Pizza, croutons and salted crackers
  • Prepackaged, processed mixes for potatoes, rice, pasta and stuffing
  • Regular canned vegetables and vegetable juices
  • Olives, pickles, sauerkraut and other pickled vegetables
  • Vegetables made with ham, bacon or salted pork
  • Packaged mixes, such as scalloped or au gratin potatoes, frozen hash browns and Tater Tots
  • Commercially prepared pasta and tomato sauces and salsa
  • Regular canned and dehydrated soup, broth and bouillon
  • Cup of noodles and seasoned ramen mixes
  • Soy sauce, seasoning salt, other sauces and marinades
  • Bottled salad dressings, regular salad dressing with bacon bits
  • Salted butter or margarine
  • Instant pudding and cake
  • Large portions of ketchup, mustard

According to American Heart Association [2] “With 65% of sodium in their diet coming from supermarkets and 25% from restaurants 9 out of 10 Americans consume too much sodium, exceeding the dosage recommended by AHA by 1900mg.”

Health benefits of a low sodium diet

Low sodium diet is strongly recommended as it not only improves the overall health and appearance, but it also affects three major risk factors – high blood pressure, stroke and coronary heart disease.

A research [3] comprised of 14 cohort studies and five randomized controlled trials reporting all cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, stroke, or coronary heart disease, 37 randomized controlled trials measuring blood pressure, renal function, blood lipids, and catecholamine levels in adults and nine controlled trials and one cohort study in children reporting on blood pressure shows three major health benefits of low sodium diet

  • In adults a reduction in sodium intake significantly reduced resting systolic blood pressure by 3.39 mm Hg and and resting diastolic blood pressure by 1.54 mm Hg
  • In children, a reduction in sodium intake significantly reduced systolic blood pressure by 0.84 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure by 0.87 mm Hg
  • Lower sodium intake is also associated with a reduced risk of stroke and fatal coronary heart disease in adults

Suggested list of low sodium foods

Even though pervasive in our diets, high sodium foods are not that difficult to avoid or to replace by healthier alternatives. Here is a list of healthy, low sodium alternatives to the previous list, suggested by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans [4] and AHA Sodium blog, [5] complete with recipes for you to try at home.

Meat, fish, eggs, beans and peas

  • Fresh meat (beef, veal, lamb, pork), poultry, fish or shellfish – low in sodium, rich in protein and iron
  • Eggs – low in sodium, rich in protein and omega -3 fatty acids
  • Dried or frozen beans and peas – low in sodium, rich in protein and iron

Suggested daily intake: 2-3 servings per day

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Recipe suggestions:

Scallop ceviche

    Low calorie and low sodium delicious lunch choice.

    White bean and roasted garlic dip

      Healthy home-made dip low in sodium and rich in fiber and protein.

      Dairy

      • Low-sodium cheese (swiss, goat, brick, ricotta, fresh mozzarella)
      • Cream cheese (light and skim)
      • Milk (1% or skim)

      Suggested daily intake: 2-3 servings per day

      Recipe suggestion:

      Phyllo Shells, Goat Cheese, and Jam

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        Creamy, crunchy, low calorie and low sodium snack

        Fruits and vegetables

        • Fresh, frozen, canned, or dried fruits
        • Fresh or frozen vegetables without added sauces
        • Low-sodium tomato juice or V-8 juice
        • Low-sodium tomato sauce

        Suggested daily intake: 5 or more servings per day

        Recipe suggestions:

        Double Apple Crumble

           Rich, low sodium dessert.

          Banana Nut Oatmeal

            Zero-sodium, healthy breakfast choice.

            Beet, Orange, and Ricotta Salad

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              Tasty and healthy salad super rich in protein and fiber.

              Tomato Stacks

                Low calorie, low sodium, savory snack.

                 Breads, grains

                • Low-sodium breads
                • Low-sodium cereals (old-fashioned oats, quick cook oatmeal, grits, Cream of Wheat or Rice, shredded wheat)
                • Pasta (noodles, spaghetti, macaroni)
                • Rice
                • Low-sodium crackers
                • Low-sodium bread crumbs
                • Granola
                • Corn tortillas
                • Plain taco shells

                Suggested daily intake: 6 or more servings per day

                Recipe suggestions:

                Easy Granol

                  Healthy breakfast choice with only 22mg of sodium, and 3 grams of protein and fiber.

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                  Pappardelle With Lemon Gremolata and Asparagus

                    Great dinner choice rich in vitamin K, protein and fiber.

                    Sweets (consume in moderation)

                    • Sherbet, sorbet, Italian ice, popsicles
                    • Fig bars, gingersnaps
                    • Jelly beans and hard candy

                    Recipe suggestion

                    Triple Chocolate Surprise Brownies

                      Low calorie, rich and fudgy dessert.

                      Fats, oils, condiments (consume in moderation)

                      • Low-sodium butter and margarine
                      • Vegetable oils
                      • Low-sodium salad dressing
                      • Homemade gravy without salt
                      • Low-sodium soups
                      • Low-sodium broth or bouillon
                      • Lemon juice
                      • Vinegar
                      • Herbs and spices without salt
                      • Low-sodium mustard
                      • Low-sodium catsup
                      • Low-sodium sauce mixes

                      Featured photo credit: Pixabay via pixabay.com

                      Reference

                      [1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19110538
                      [2] SOURCE:American Heart Association
                      [3] SOURCE:Effect of lower sodium intake on health: systematic review and meta-analyses
                      [4] SOURCE: Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2020
                      [5] SOURCE: AHA Sodium blog/

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                      Why Is Goal Setting Important to a Truly Fulfilling Life?

                      Why Is Goal Setting Important to a Truly Fulfilling Life?

                      In Personal Development-speak, we are always talking about goals, outcomes, success, desires and dreams. In other words, all the stuff we want to do, achieve and create in our world.

                      And while it’s important for us to know what we want to achieve (our goal), it’s also important for us to understand why we want to achieve it; the reason behind the goal or some would say, our real goal.

                      Why is goal setting important?

                      1. Your needs and desire will be fulfilled.

                      Sometimes when we explore our “why”, (why we want to achieve a certain thing) we realize that our “what” (our goal) might not actually deliver us the thing (feeling, emotion, internal state) we’re really seeking.

                      For example, the person who has a goal to lose weight in the belief that weight loss will bring them happiness, security, fulfillment, attention, popularity and the partner of their dreams. In this instance, their “what” is weight-loss and their “why” is happiness (etc.) and a partner.

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                      Six months later, they have lost the weight (achieved their goal) but as is often the case, they’re not happier, not more secure, not more confident, not more fulfilled and in keeping with their miserable state, they have failed to attract their dream partner.

                      After all, who wants to be with someone who’s miserable? They achieved their practical goal but still failed to have their needs met.

                      So they set a goal to lose another ten pounds. And then another. And maybe just ten more. With the destructive and erroneous belief that if they can get thin enough, they’ll find their own personal nirvana. And we all know how that story ends.

                      2. You’ll find out what truly motivates you

                      The important thing in the process of constructing our best life is not necessarily what goals we set (what we think we want) but what motivates us towards those goals (what we really want).

                      The sooner we begin to explore, identify and understand what motivates us towards certain achievements, acquisitions or outcomes (that is, we begin moving towards greater consciousness and self awareness), the sooner we will make better decisions for our life, set more intelligent (and dare I say, enlightened) goals and experience more fulfilment and less frustration.

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                      We all know people who have achieved what they set out to, only to end up in the same place or worse (emotionally, psychologically, sociologically) because what they were chasing wasn’t really what they were needing.

                      What we think we want will rarely provide us with what we actually need.

                      3. Your state of mind will be a lot healthier

                      We all set specific goals to achieve/acquire certain things (a job, a car, a partner, a better body, a bank balance, a title, a victory) because at some level, most of us believe (consciously or not) that the achievement of those goals will bring us what we really seek; joy, fulfilment, happiness, safety, peace, recognition, love, acceptance, respect, connection.

                      Of course, setting practical, material and financial goals is an intelligent thing to do considering the world we live in and how that world works.

                      But setting goals with an expectation that the achievement of certain things in our external, physical world will automatically create an internal state of peace, contentment, joy and total happiness is an unhealthy and unrealistic mindset to inhabit.

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                      What you truly want and need

                      Sometimes we need to look beyond the obvious (superficial) goals to discover and secure what we really want.

                      Sadly, we live in a collective mindset which teaches that the prettiest and the wealthiest are the most successful.

                      Some self-help frauds even teach this message. If you’re rich or pretty, you’re happy. If you’re both, you’re very happy. Pretty isn’t what we really want; it’s what we believe pretty will bring us. Same goes with money.

                      When we cut through the hype, the jargon and the self-help mumbo jumbo, we all have the same basic goals, desires and needs:

                      Joy, fulfilment, happiness, safety, peace, recognition, love, acceptance, respect, connection.

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                      Nobody needs a mansion or a sport’s car but we all need love.

                      Nobody needs massive pecs, six percent body-fat, a face lift or bigger breasts but we all need connection, acceptance and understanding.

                      Nobody needs to be famous but we all need peace, calm, balance and happiness.

                      The problem is, we live in a culture which teaches that one equals the other. If only we lived in a culture which taught that real success is far more about what’s happening in our internal environment, than our external one.

                      It’s a commonly-held belief that we’re all very different and we all have different goals — whether short term or long term goals. But in many ways we’re not, and we don’t; we all want essentially the same things.

                      Now all you have to do is see past the fraud and deception and find the right path.

                      Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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