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5 Rapidly Growing International Cities Worth Investing In

5 Rapidly Growing International Cities Worth Investing In

Investors around the world are now looking for diverse ways expand their portfolio. As the global market becomes volatile, investing in real estate must be done carefully. If you are an investor, here are five rapidly growing international cities worth investing in.

1. Sydney, Australia

Sydney is not the capital of Australia, but it’s the largest city in the country, and it has wonderful weather year-round. Australia as a whole ranks 6th in the world with regards to the Legatum Prosperity Index, which is based upon a variety of factors.

Sydney is a thriving city with financial and economic growth, and it contends with some of the world’s most expensive real estate prices. For the past 30 years, housing prices have been rising 7.25 percent a year, making housing a prime investment. Australia had $243 billion in exports in 2014, many of which went out of Sydney. If you are not familiar with this market, there are plenty of companies that will provide free investment property advice.

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2. Panama City, Panama

Panama City is the capital of Panama and is known for its legendary megastructure, the Panama Canal. Panama is also well known for its friendly banking regulations, which bring in business clients from around the world. The city itself has close to 900,000 residents and has a tropical climate.

The local economy thrives on the business brought in from banking customers and on the fact that the city lies right on the ocean, which strengthens both imports and exports.

3. Jakarta, Indonesia

Jakarta is the capital of Indonesia and is the largest and most populous city the country. Indonesia is known for its tropical climate, which brings travelers from around the world to vacation here. A large portion of Indonesian business comes from tourism. Indonesia is an archipelago made up of 18,000 islands.

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Aside from the tourism, Jakarta has an abundance of mineral wealth including everything from copper and gold to steel and oil. This drives the country’s strong export economy. Financial transactions and lending have traditionally been difficult here due to problems with infrastructure, so investors have been pouring their money into startups which promise to solve these issues while delivering solid returns.

4. Chicago, IL, USA

Chicago, IL is the third-largest city in the US, according to statistics. Chicago is known as the “Windy City” of the Midwest and lies along the shores of Lake Michigan, which is one of the Great Lakes of North America. Chicago has always been a United States financial hub, second only to New York City.

Everything from stock options to commodities goes through the financial portal at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) and the Chicago Board of Options Exchange (CBOE). Besides its financial role, Chicago is known for its commercial real estate empires and for the imports and exports that come from the Great Lakes. Recently, tech firms and startups have been coming to Chicago, inspiring bright hopes about the city’s future.

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5. Cebu City, Philippines

Cebu City is known as the Queen City of Southeast Asia. It’s the second most populous city in the country, just after Manila. The climate is tropical and is less prone to natural calamities. Moreover, the city is strategically located, as it is in the center of the Philippines. This makes it a trading hub for the country and for exports as well.

Under the Philippines’ new president, Rodrigo Duterte, who will hold office until 2022, there has been an economic shift in the country. New economic partners in China are pouring investments into many parts of the country.

The Philippines has long done business with China and with its other neighbors in Southeast Asia. This has provided a steady flow of minerals, oil, and agricultural products. Cebu City continues to grow rapidly, and the inflow of business, tech, trade, and real estate construction projects make this city popular with investors.

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Conclusion

There are many cities around the world in which you could invest your money. However, there are only a handful that continue to thrive. We hope that you look hard at the cities listed here and make sound decisions involving any investment you make.

Which city would you invest in, and what would drive you to go there?

Featured photo credit: Forbes via blogs-images.forbes.com

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Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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