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Top 10 Ways To Free Up Memory Space On Your Android Device

Top 10 Ways To Free Up Memory Space On Your Android Device

Android devices are very ubiquitous today. Their popularity is unparalleled among operating systems and you can’t look anywhere without seeing an Android smartphone. There are numerous reasons why Android phones are so popular. They are so much fun to use, thanks to their user-friendly interface. They also enhance productivity greatly, at least more than smartphones running on other operating systems. They also have an extremely wide application ecosystem. Android phones have been found to have the most apps in their Google Play Store as app developers, seeing the ever-increasing popularity of Android phones and in a bid to make large and quick profits, prefer to make apps with Android support.

However, for all the advantages of Android phones, one main disadvantage of this operating system is memory restrictions. Android phones are known for relying greatly on memory capabilities for optimum functionality. This means that no matter how advanced your Android is, its overall functionality will be reduced if its memory is full (or almost full, for that matter). Most of the time, the consistent installation and use of different apps leads to memory congestion. Memory congestion could also be due to your pictures, videos, and other media files. Either way, there’s the need to free up memory from time to time.

If your Android phone (or any other Android device) is running low on or flat out of device storage, here are a few ways to free up memory space on your Android device and optimize device memory:

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Use a microSD card

This is the most obvious way to increase storage space on your Android device. Using a memory card is safe and efficient for your device, even if the device in question doesn’t support a memory card. If your device does support a memory card, the first (and safest) thing you’ll want to do is to check for the manufacturer’s recommendations regarding memory cards and their specifications.

For example, most low- and middle-range devices can only accommodate memory cards up to 64GB, while high-end Android devices can support memory cards with storage spaces up to 128GB. Being careful about memory card selections will definitely save you money. However, if your phone doesn’t naturally support a memory card, a plausible option is to use a memory card reader, which connects to your phone’s micro USB port.

Manual app deleting

The first manual measure you can take to free space on your Android device is to begin deleting unwanted apps. Most Android devices come with some pre-installed apps that are of no use to the users. As a user, you can delete pre-installed apps that you have no interest in keeping.

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Also, apps become redundant due to the discovery of newer and better ones. Older apps end up taking up memory and are not being used. They can also be deleted. If you ever decide that you need them again, you can easily reinstall them from your Google Play Store on any device, as long as the device has your email address and login details.

Clear up app caches

Apps that are currently in use could also be taking up storage space, as they continually take up cache space. Periodically clearing these caches could free up space and also has the potential of solving issues with misbehaving apps .

Cloud storage

Investing in cloud storage is an awesome way of increasing your storage space. A cloud is a site or space in the internet where you can back up your files. Apps and services such as Dropbox, iCloud, etc. are examples of cloud storage. Saving old pictures, documents, and other related files to a cloud can free up your storage space and can allow you to delete pictures and files from your phone without deleting them permanently.

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When needed, you can simply log into the cloud to retrieve the saved files. However, a downside to cloud storage is that you can only access your saved files when connected to an active internet service.

Wireless Hard Disk

Wireless hard disks work the same way as good old external hard disks, except that you access them using a WiFi connection. They have a wide range of other features and are increasingly becoming more affordable.

Rooting

Rooting involves increasing the operating system capabilities of your phone. It makes your phone faster by searching the deep parts of your phone and getting rid of useless data. The downside of rooting is that if it isn’t done well, it could cause more harm than good. For a trusted rooting service, I recommend Root Explorer Premium. It’s extremely easy and the safety of all your files can definitely be guaranteed.

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Google Photos

Google Photos is a highly efficient way to back up your pictures and videos. Once saved, you can delete the pictures from your local library. To turn on this feature on your phone, simply open the Google Photos app, go to Settings > Backup & Sync, and turn it on. When backing up your photos, it is advisable to do so in “high quality” mode, as this mode not only saves your pictures in high resolution, but it also doesn’t count against your Google Drive space.

Get rid of offline content

A lot of apps allow you to save stuff while offline, for example, Spotify and OneNote. This feature is awesome, but only if you have enough memory. If your device memory is getting filled up and you’re desperately looking for stuff to delete, your offline downloads might be a great place to start.

Get an active AntiVirus

An active and up-to-date AntiVirus software has the capability of sifting through your device storage to find out which parts are unessential (and as such, deleting them won’t cause any harm to your information, preset settings or your device in general). Investing in these apps will definitely be a smart move when seeking to free up your device memory overall.

Get a storage analyzer

If all previous steps fail, it might be time to get a storage analyzer. This app launches an investigation into your device’s folders, finds cargo like old downloads or leftovers from deleted games, and gets rid of them. The best storage analyzer out there is DiskUsage. It’s free and very easy to operate.

More by this author

Tanvir Zafar

The founder of ISU Technologies, passionate in writing about entrepreneurship, work and technology.

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Last Updated on February 15, 2019

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

Joe’s Goals

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    Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

    Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

    Daytum

      Daytum

      is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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      Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

      Excel or Numbers

        If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

        What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

        Evernote

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          I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

          Evernote is free with a premium version available.

          Access or Bento

            If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

            Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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            You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

            Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

            All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

            Conclusion

            I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

            What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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