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Why Going Low-Carb Is The Best Remedy For Sinus Infection

Why Going Low-Carb Is The Best Remedy For Sinus Infection

People with chronic sinus issues know misery. With chronic sinus issues, there are headaches, facial tenderness, pressure in the sinuses, teeth and ears, fevers, sore throats, coughing, that nasty nasal drip or, even worse, the dreaded stuffy nose accompanied by mouth breathing. Not a pretty picture.

So what causes sinus infection or sinusitis?[1]

It turns out that the the problem isn’t the sinuses themselves.[2] Your sinuses are just hollow air spaces within the bones between your eyes, behind your cheekbones, and in the forehead. They make mucus, which keep the inside of your nose moist and helps protect against dust, allergens, and pollutants. Sinus infections occur when the tissue in your nose is swollen from allergies[3], a cold, or something in the environment that block the sinus passages. The actual causes of sinus infections are numerous and encompass a wide variety of factors, such as a cold or flu, seasonal allergies, or even food sensitivities.

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Carbohydrate sensitivity and sinus infection

“Typical” food allergy symptoms–scratchy throat, hives, swelling—are easily identified and you know if you have a food allergy, you must avoid contact with that particular allergen at all costs. But what about that brain fog, fatigue, and headaches you’ve been having? The truth is, most of us are sensitive to some of the foods we consume all of the time. Therefore, learning your particular food sensitivities is an important part of eliminating common ailments including sinusitis.

Carbohydrate is another name for sugar and can be broken down into two categories: simple and complex. In a nut shell, simple carbs are the sugars added to foods during processing. Added sugar appear on ingredient labels as corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup, dextrose, fructose, fruit juice concentrates, maltose, molasses, or syrup. These sugars are commonly added to white bread, crackers, sweets, and processed foods.

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Complex carbs, on the other hand, are frequently referred to as dietary starch and are made of sugar molecules strung together like a chain and are rich in fiber. Complex carbohydrates are commonly found in whole plant foods and, therefore, provide a myriad of health benefits.

According to Jacob Teitelbaum[4], M.D., author of “Beat Sugar Addiction Now!“, sinusitis is one possible side effect of simple carb or sugar sensitivity. Sugar weakens the immune system, which leads to a higher potential for sinus infections. When the immune system is weakened, it is more susceptible to bacteria, viruses, and allergies. So then, the answer to sinus relief for those with a carb sensitivity must be to eliminate or, at the very least, drastically limit the amount of carbs you are consuming, right?

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It’s not quite that simple.

While eliminating carbs from your diet might provide you some relief from sinus problems, it could cause other and more serious health problems. A low carbohydrate diet can cause headaches, dizziness, fatigue, muscle weakness, nausea, diarrhea, and constipation. Instead of going low or no carb, nutrition experts advise that you substitute the simple carb foods you eat with more complex carb options.

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Switching from simple to complex carbs

Complex carbs provide your body with more nutrition and longer-lasting energy than simple carbs do. Complex carbs can be found in fruits, vegetables, whole grain breads, whole grain pasta, oats, beans, and brown rice. Simply put, for the carb-sensitive, eating more fresh, whole foods and limiting the amount of processed foods will have you breathing easier in no time.

Reference

[1] http://www.medicinenet.com/sinusitis/article.htm
[2] http://www.webmd.com/allergies/picture-of-the-sinuses#1
[3] http://www.lifehack.org/456811/how-survive-seasonal-allergies
[4] http://www.doctoroz.com/blog/jacob-teitelbaum-md/what-kind-sugar-addict-are-you

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Denise Hill

Denise shares about psychology and communication tips on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on November 20, 2020

Kickstart Your Morning Workout With These 10 Simple Habits

Kickstart Your Morning Workout With These 10 Simple Habits

Benjamin Franklin said it like this: “Early to bed, early to rise, will make a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.” He knew from his own experiences and watching others that the ones who got up early were healthier and more successful. That’s why a morning workout can be so important.

One 2017 study found that:[1]

“after controlling for such factors as age, sex, smoking habits, and others…night owls, were found to have a 10 percent greater risk of dying from any cause compared to morning types.”

This is a great reason to tap into some morning motivation and get your morning workout done.

Circadian Rhythm for morning workout

    As you can see in the above graph, your blood pressure begins to rise between 6 and 7 in the morning[2]. That means this is a great time to get your body moving and your heart pumping, even if it’s just for 20 minutes of exercise in the morning. 

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    Here are some tips on how to find the motivation for a morning workout.

    1. Remember Your Why

    It starts with remembering why you want to get up for a morning workout. If you don’t set a goal and establish your reasons for accomplishing a health and fitness goal, then you definitely won’t get up early.

    Getting up early isn’t easy. If it were, everyone would do it, right? Your goal for your health and fitness must be so strong, and the WHY behind it must be so powerful, that nothing will stop you from accomplishing that goal.

    2. Go to Bed Early

    If you want to get up early for a morning workout, it’s going to be important to get to bed earlier. Falling asleep at midnight and trying to get up at six just won’t work in your favor.

    This will likely be very difficult for a few days while you adjust your sleeping habits. However, as you get into an exercise routine in the morning, this will naturally make it easier to fall asleep earlier and faster at night.

    3. Make a Commitment

    I sometimes tell my Facebook community of my plans to work out, and we all keep each other motivated by posting our runs, our workouts, etc. This is a way to develop accountability. By publicly announcing your intentions, you increase your chances of actually carrying out your plans.

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    Another way to do this is to find an accountability partner who has similar goals for morning workouts. You can check in with each other to make sure you’re sticking to your plans. If that doesn’t work, hire a personal trainer for a few weeks to get you started.  

    You can learn how to find a good accountability partner here.

    4. Find a Friend

    If you can find a friend that is motivated like you are, and you can hold each other accountable daily to working out, then you will accomplish your fitness goals. Many people prefer working out with friends to working out alone. Whether it’s a chat while hitting the treadmill at the gym, or having someone to spot you while weightlifting, working out with friends is sometimes just more enjoyable.

    Texting each other the night before with a simple statement is best. Don’t ask: “Are we still working out in the morning?” With this kind of question, if they were thinking about not working out, you just gave them an opt out.

    Make a statement instead: “Can’t wait to see you in the morning!” This implies that they will be there, and they will feel more obligated to show up.

    5. Treat Yourself

    We all have to treat ourselves every now and then. After a morning workout, plan to treat yourself with a colorful, healthy breakfast or a delicious morning smoothie. This will help you look forward to something and push through to the end of your workout.

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    You can learn more on rewards and punishments here.

    6. Change your Mindset

    Many people throw away the idea of a morning workout by simply saying, “I’m not a morning person.”  Instead of using this excuse, decide to try to become a morning person by shifting your mindset.

    When you look into the benefits of waking up early and getting some exercise in before your day starts, you’ll feel more positive about your life overall.

    7. Plan Your Day

    You know you’re going to be busy. Try time blocking to plan all the things you need to do on a given day, and make sure you add in your morning workout[3]. If you have a plan laid out, you’ll be more likely to follow it and get done everything on your list done.

    Time blocking

      8. Reflect on How You’ll Feel After

      Starting a morning workout is hard, but visualizing how you’ll feel after can help you find motivation. Think about the extra energy you’ll have and how proud you’ll feel knowing that you were already so productive. No matter what you do the rest of the day, at least you squeezed in your exercise!

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      For me, I live in an area where there are a lot of runners. When I am heading home in the evening or sitting out on the patio at one of my favorite restaurants, and I see the runners go by, it makes me feel so accomplished that I got mine in that morning and I can enjoy the evening.

      9. Lay out Your Workout Clothes

      Setting out your workout clothes the night before makes it impossible for you to start to run late because you couldn’t find something to wear. Tap into the determination you have before bed in order to convince your less-than-motivated morning self that you need to get up and get your morning workout in. When you wake up and see your outfit laid out next to you, it’ll push you to get up and get moving.

      10.  Set Multiple Alarms

      Many people miss their morning workout simply because they hit the snooze button so many times. In order to make this more difficult for yourself, set a series of alarms. That way, if you keep hitting snooze, you’ll have three or four alarms going off every ten minutes, which will be annoying enough to get you out of bed.

      Also, put one alarm at least a few feet from your bed so that you’re forced to get up to turn it off.

      Final Thoughts

      About three years ago I went from being the person that says I will never be an early riser to a person that loves to get the day started as soon as possible. Without the distractions that begin to come around 8 or 9 in the morning, you’ll find that you’re more productive and more likely to squeeze in that morning workout.

      Take some of the actions above and find the best morning workout routine to start your day and feel good.

      More Tips on Morning Exercises

      Featured photo credit: Tomasz Woźniak via unsplash.com

      Reference

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