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Top 5 Health Benefits Of Drinking Espresso

Top 5 Health Benefits Of Drinking Espresso

Everyone knows that drinking coffee will give you that nice little caffeine boost. A shot of espresso is particularly well known for this, but what tends to be lesser well known is the fact that espresso offers several other benefits.

If you needed another reason to drink espresso, we’ve got just the list for you. This list covers the top five health benefits of drinking espresso, from enjoying improved memory functions to helping you shed a few pounds.

1. It enhances long-term memory

Mastering the art of pouring the perfect espresso shot is worth it when you consider that by drinking the right amount of caffeine, you can improve your long-term memory.

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Neuro-scientist Michael Yassa, from the University of California, conducted a study which found that drinking the equivalent of two espressos enhanced the process of memory consolidation. This process, in turn, improved long-term memory among the subjects.

Stick to the recommended amount if you want to see improvements since the study did not find any benefits for those who consumed more or less than two cups.

2. It increases attention

Many people start off their day with a shot of espresso, and this comes as no surprise. Caffeine has been found to reduce symptoms of fatigue, while also improving sustained attention and vigilance. These effects are thought to occur thanks to a neuro-chemical interaction.

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Coffee maintains a greater dopamine concentration, particularly in the areas of the brain that are linked to attention. Keep in mind that the benefits tend to be short-term, and you want to avoid overdoing it. Too much caffeine can make you feel jittery, making it far harder to concentrate.

3. It can help you lose weight

What sets espresso apart from some of the other beverages found at coffee shops, is that it is low-calorie. It only contains about three calories per ounce, assuming you’re not adding any sugar or cream.

But, besides being low-calorie, it can also help to improve your exercise performance. A study published in the Medicine and Science in Sports Journal found that caffeine made workouts appear less strenuous, by lowering the perceived level of exertion by over 5%.

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Besides making exercise seem easier, coffee also reduces the level of perceived muscle pain which occurs when doing exercises. Ingesting a dose of caffeine equivalent to two or three cups of coffee an hour before 30 minutes of workout reduces muscle pain, allowing you to push yourself a little bit harder.

4. It reduces the risk of a stroke

In a Swedish study conducted by Susanna Larsson, researchers found that drinking at least one cup of coffee a day can lessen the risk of suffering from a stroke. This result is thought to be due to the antioxidant properties of coffee.

The study concentrated on a group of women over a 10-year period. They concluded that drinking one or more cups of coffee a day reduced your chances of suffering from a stroke by 25%. Another study found similar results in male smokers, whose risk was reduced by 21% with eight or more cups of coffee a day.

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5. It lowers your risk of diabetes

In a study led by Harvard School of Public Health, researchers found that higher coffee consumption is linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. The study analyzed caffeine consumption in men and women over a four-year period.

It concluded that those who increased their daily coffee consumption by more than one cup lowered their risk of type 2 diabetes by 11%. Of course, drinking more coffee is just one factor that can influence diabetes risk, so you still want to be physically active and watch your weight.

Espressos provide several health benefits, so you don’t have to feel so guilty about your caffeine addiction. Even if you’re not the biggest fan of a regular espresso, there are many different coffee serving styles out there, so you’ll be sure to find something that meets your taste.

Featured photo credit: pixabay.com via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on May 15, 2019

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

As it appears, the human mind is not capable of not thinking, at least on the subconscious level. Our mind is always occupied by thoughts, whether we want to or not, and they influence our every action.

“Happiness cannot come from without, it comes from within.” – Helen Keller

When we are still children, our thoughts seem to be purely positive. Have you ever been around a 4-year old who doesn’t like a painting he or she drew? I haven’t. Instead, I see glee, exciting and pride in children’s eyes. But as the years go by, we clutter our mind with doubts, fears and self-deprecating thoughts.

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Just imagine then how much we limit ourselves in every aspect of our lives if we give negative thoughts too much power! We’ll never go after that job we’ve always wanted because our nay-saying thoughts make us doubt our abilities. We’ll never ask that person we like out on a date because we always think we’re not good enough.

We’ll never risk quitting our job in order to pursue the life and the work of our dreams because we can’t get over our mental barrier that insists we’re too weak, too unimportant and too dumb. We’ll never lose those pounds that risk our health because we believe we’re not capable of pushing our limits. We’ll never be able to fully see our inner potential because we simply don’t dare to question the voices in our head.

But enough is enough! It’s time to stop these limiting beliefs and come to a place of sanity, love and excitement about life, work and ourselves.

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So…how exactly are we to achieve that?

It’s not as hard as it may seem; you just have to practice, practice, practice. Here are a few ideas on how you can get started.

1. Learn to substitute every negative thought with a positive one.

Every time a negative thought crawls into your mind, replace it with a positive thought. It’s just like someone writes a phrase you don’t like on a blackboard and then you get up, erase it and write something much more to your liking.

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2. See the positive side of every situation, even when you are surrounded by pure negativity.

This one is a bit harder to put into practice, which does not mean it’s impossible.

You can find positivity in everything by mentally holding on to something positive, whether this be family, friends, your faith, nature, someone’s sparkling eyes or whatever other glimmer of beauty. If you seek it, you will find it.

3. At least once a day, take a moment and think of 5 things you are grateful for.

This will lighten your mood and give you some perspective of what is really important in life and how many blessings surround you already.

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4. Change the mental images you allow to enter your mind.

How you see yourself and your surroundings make a huge difference to your thinking. It is like watching a DVD that saddens and frustrates you, completely pulling you down. Eject that old DVD, throw it away and insert a new, better, more hopeful one instead.

So, instead of dwelling on dark, negative thoughts, consciously build and focus on positive, light and colorful images, thoughts and situations in your mind a few times a day.

If you are persistent and keep on working on yourself, your mind will automatically reject its negative thoughts and welcome the positive ones.

And remember: You are (or will become) what you think you are. This is reason enough to be proactive about whatever is going on in your head.

Featured photo credit: Kyaw Tun via unsplash.com

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