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Last Updated on August 14, 2018

Your Body on Caffeine Addiction: 70 Cups of Coffee in 7 Days

Your Body on Caffeine Addiction: 70 Cups of Coffee in 7 Days

A previous boss of mine once proudly stated that he drank 10 cups of coffee every single day.

Completely baffled, yet also intrigued by that statement, I couldn’t help but wonder how he might feel.

Is his sleep restful? Does he feel productive and healthy? Is drinking this amount dangerous?

That’s why I decided recently to voluntarily get addicted to caffeine – I drank 70 cups of coffee in 7 days. Here’s how the caffeine addiction unexpectedly disrupted my health, well-being and productivity.

Day 1: How to deal with caffeine intoxication

The most cups that I ever drank in my life regularly was about 4 cups of coffee a day, which means I didn’t know how my body would react to the caffeine intake in the first place – this was scary, to be honest.

What gave me some security was ranking under-average on the HEXACO personality-test on emotionality (regarding traits such as fearfulness, anxiety and sensitivity). As caffeine has been shown to increase the effect of those traits.[1] If you rate high on the personality test on emotionality, you might feel the effects of the caffeine intake quite strongly.

As I decided to start this experiment late in the day on a whim after immense amount of procrastination, I immediately needed to face two challenges:

  • Not destroying my sleep quality
  • Dealing with caffeine intoxication

The effects of caffeine intoxication were clear after drinking 6 cups of coffee and dealing with stomach problems, I wondered if this challenge can actually be fatal. It happily turned out that the lethal dose of caffeine is considered to be around 10 grams.[2]

This means that I needed to drink about 130 coffees to potentially end myself. I felt safe.

What I didn’t know is that the effects of caffeine intoxication can start at blood-levels of about 250mg.[3] Even if I considered the half-life of caffeine, which turns out to be approximately 6 hours, I already passed that benchmark.[4]

While I dealt with gastrointestinal problems from the get-go, at that point I also dealt with rambling flow of thoughts and speech, restlessness, severe sweating bursts and later on insomnia.

At that time, I worked for my eCornell certification in Plant Based Nutrition and various other projects. I was busy but I wasn’t being productive. I had to postpone nearly all of the endeavours.

How to deal with the acute, negative effects

As caffeine has been shown to increase your cortisol levels, it’s important to implement stress relieving tactics in your day. I ended the first day with a long-walk, while listening to soothening piano music.

I also played a calming instrument at the end of the day, wore blue-light blocking glasses and shut down my mobile phone atleast 2 hours before going to sleep. Regarding diet I ate 3 kiwis[5] and drank a chamomile tea, which are linked to melatonin production and decreased cortisol levels.[6]

These are all stress-relieving tactics that have worked for me in the past. We all should have at least 3 tactics on your hand that we can implement to relieve stress in our daily life. The more often we use them, the more effective they become, as our brain starts to associate these tactics with stress relief.

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Day 2: How it made me nearly depressive

I like to go to sleep and wake up early. Yet the 10 cups of coffee completely disrupted my natural sleep cycle.

After planning to wake up at 5am, I ultimately woke up at 8am after 7 hours of sleep.

I woke up with slight nausea, probably from the caffeine intoxication of yesterday. At that point, I also realized that the second day would be the hardest day of the challenge. Considering the half-life of 6 hours, I still got about 200mg of caffeine in my blood at that time.

While one cup of coffee used to pump me up quite good in the past, I now couldn’t feel a difference at all in energy levels. I have noted energy increases at 3 cups of coffee. Which funnily enough put me back into the caffeine intoxication blood-levels.

While I planned to exercise quite early in the morning, I only found the willpower at 3pm on day 2. But going for this jogging session might be the best decision that I ever did on this challenge. Here’s why:

How I cracked the code to the challenge

I’m still not sure if it was the increased blood flow to the brain or the unbearing circumstances of the challenge that made me come up with the solution to the caffeine problem.

I decided to deal with the three most productivity-reducing challenges on the experiment:

  1. Random, excessive sweating
  2. Gastrointestinal issues
  3. Impaired thinking and increased anxiety

I dealt with the random, excessive sweating while adding ice to my coffee and drinking a cold smoothie at the same time. While cold beverages are regulating your body temperature, they also decrease the blood flow to your digestive system. They therefore might also slow or hinder the absorption of the caffeine.

The gastrointestinal issues have been treated with increased fiber intake. I aimed to eat atleast 50grams of fiber every single day. This is 150% of the RDA.[7]

The impaired thinking and increased anxiety were obliterated by daily exercise or random naps. I actually felt like I took control of the experiment.

Yet I was proved wrong in the following days. Here came day 3.

Day 3: Awake for 23 hours

The most amazing part of this caffeine challenge was the tolerance build up.

The third day I woke up at 4:30 in the morning while having my last 3 coffees less than 9 hours ago.

Falling asleep was easy. This was the first day I woke up energized and motivated during the challenge. I gulped down 3 cups of coffees and went for a workout.

The gastrointestinal issues should have been sorted out because this was my first day that my stool was on the Bristol scale between type 2-4 again. This might sound weird but the consistency of our feaces is an indicator of our overall health.[8]

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I ended the day at 3am after going out. This was the moment that I realized that I was awake for 23 hours.

I wondered if this caffeine challenge was indeed ending me, without me even noticing it.

How fast does your body build up a caffeine tolerance?

A first time coffee drinker or one that has abstained from caffeine for a long time has no tolerance to caffeine. This is when caffeine works the best and produces the following positive side effects:

  1. Alertness
  2. Euphoria
  3. Motivation

In the caffeine challenge, I didn’t see those positive effects after a couple of days. In fact, according to this study, caffeine tolerance can start to build up within 1 days.[9]

Caffeine works because it blocks our adenosine receptors. This increases our state of arousal and our capacity for performance.

But here’s the thing:

Your brain knows that something is not quite right after caffeine consumption and is producing more adenosine receptors. Apparently the feelings of fatigue are crucial for our survival, which means the caffeine tolerance starts building up.

If you drink the same amount of coffee for several days, you don’t see positive effects anymore. Unless you increase the dose of the substance.

Welcome to the caffeine rat race!

Day 4: The caffeine rat race

I soon realized that the morning on caffeine addiction are absolutely horrible. On day 4 I could barely open my eyes. It felt like someone sewed them together mid-night.

This is a phenomena called sleep inertia. Sleep inertia is the grogginess one feels after 15-60 minutes after waking. I noticed that the caffeine addiction increases this feeling.

Important:

Do not drive a vehicle or make important decisions within that time frame, especially if you’re on high doses of caffeine.

You can decrease the effects of sleep inertia by taking a short nap (under 30 minutes), exercising or, ironically, drinking a caffeinated beverage.

I assumed that sleep inertia might be incur on this challenge because the caffeine-level is lowest in the morning. Excess caffeine intake increases your levels of adenosine receptors in your brain. The more adenosine receptors you have, the more fatigued you will be, especially if you have no caffeine in your blood.

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Caffeine addiction and the law of diminishing return

In economics, the law of diminishing return refers to a point at which the level of benefits gained is less than the amount of money or energy invested.

I like to drink coffee. I’ve experimented with caffeine before and I realized that 2 coffees a day are giving myself the best results long-term. The first day I already noticed that the next 8 coffees are not giving me much benefits.

To the contrary:

While 2 coffees used to produce euphoria and increased motivation, they now produced no effects at all. Combined with 8 other coffees in a day, they instead resulted to increased and anxiety and slight nausea.

Day 5: The 12-hour work shift

After drinking 8 cups of coffee plus having a jogging session before 2pm, I felt ready to tackle my first work-day after my holidays.

What I lacked in energy in the morning, I compensated with energy in the evening. I finished work at 1am, with decent overtime. This made me realize that there’s a different energy curve in coffee addiction:

The energy curve in coffee addiction

There was an upside to the caffeine challenge. While energy levels during the day are usually correlated with time of the day (and therefore light-levels), body temperature and nutrient intake. These factors are based on our circadian rhythm and therefore mostly out of our control.[10]

On this challenge instead, I felt like I could exercise some level of control on my energy levels by altering my caffeine intake. If I ingested 200mg of caffeine (3 cups of coffee) or more I noticed a slight increase in energy.

While my energy pre-challenge was more even during the day, I noticed more ups and downs during the challenge. Overall I must conclude that I had more energy and a way higher baseline of my energy on my usual, lower caffeine intake.

Day 6: Surviving after a hard work day

After waking up at 10am, my stomach was turning. It’s another day of late shift and I’m struggling to deal with the basic challenges of human life again on this experiment. Getting out of bed seemed impossible.

What followed were 8 hours of stressful work. After finishing work at 11pm, I got anxious about the early shift at the 7th day.

The anxiety producing effects of caffeine

Anxiety is an unpleasant, high-arousal state, classified by high sympathetic (fight-or-flight) activity. Caffeine has been shown to increase the level of your sympathetic nervous system.

Regular consumption of high caffeine doses can lead to a a condition known as caffeinism.[11] On this experiment, I suddenly realized how I stressed out about unimportant things and could barely make a decision.

In a leadership position, staying cool-headed and being decisive is important. The caffeine intake aggravated both of these traits in myself.

Day 7: Surviving on 3.5 hours on sleep

This day was a real stress test. I had to wake up at 4:30am for my early shift which started at 6am. Normally, I can deal with acute sleep loss quite easily but I could barely open my eyes on that day. My head was flushed.

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After ingesting more than 4 coffees in less than 1 hour, I stumbled to open the fitness center and start training clients. After 7 hours of drudgery on a sleep-deprived basis, I called it quit.

After gulping down the last cups of brown liquid in a coffee shop, my foggy brain forced me to do an impulse purchase of expensive clothes. I earned it.

How your caffeine addiction is torching your money

On the last day, I treated myself with a double espresso at the said coffee shop. I paid $5 for that beverage.

While this might not be a huge expenditure, it can definitely add up in the long-term. Five double espressos a day would cost me $25. If we multiply this by 365 (days in a year), we end up with $9,125.

This is enough money to pay for a 20-days, exclusive 5-star hotel vacation on the breath-taking archipelago of Fiji every single year (with flight prices included)!

If we add all the impulsive purchases during that time and multiply it by 50 (weeks in a year), partly due to caffeine and/or sleep deprivation,[12] we can add easily another 2-3 weeks to this chic holiday.

Day 8+: How to deal with the caffeine withdrawal

After I drank the last cups of coffee, I went to sleep for at least 12 hours. The following two days of the caffeine challenge were marked by withdrawal symptoms such as:

  • Lack of concentration
  • Lethargy
  • Decreased exercise performance
  • Brain fog
  • Sleepiness

The most debilitating factor was sleepiness. The next 2 days I slept double the amount that I usually did, 12+ hours. My alarm clock used ‘wake Florian up’ – it was not effective.

While I went through the motions in my work, I felt like I didn’t produce anything productive at all.

Conclusion

The caffeine addiction unexpectedly disrupted my health, well-being and productivity.

I can now state with good conscience that drinking 10 cups of coffee a day was not beneficial for myself. And we’ve discovered a lot of scientific evidence, proving that:

Caffeine has a diminishing rate of return on our productivity and well-being. It can also increase our anxiety and reduce our thinking capabilities. This can decrease our effectiveness in dealing with the daily challenges that we face as busy professionals, where we need a clear head and decisiveness.

While caffeine might produce short-term productivity gains (due to the altered energy curve) and therefore might help us reach deadlines, it’s not recommended to use it in high doses in the long-term.

To watch the raw, vlog-like video of the challenge from this article. Check out the following video! Warning: It’s not for the faint-hearted.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nqnsktX0Ts

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

Reference

More by this author

Florian Wüest

Qualified and experienced fitness trainer and online coach.

Why You Should Keep a Fitness Journal to Jumpstart Weight Loss The Truth Behind Rapid Weight Loss and the Best Way to Shed Pounds How Long Does it Take to Build Muscle and Increase Fat Loss? How Vegan Bodybuilding Diet Keeps Hunger at Bay While Plant Based The Biggest Myth Debunked: The More Protein You Eat, the Faster You Build Muscles?

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Last Updated on February 21, 2019

Top 9 Foods for Incredible Brian Health And Brain Power

Top 9 Foods for Incredible Brian Health And Brain Power

Your brain is the most intricate and powerful organ in your entire body. It’s essentially a super-computer with brain power like a Ferrari.

If you have a Ferrari, would you put cheap gasoline in it? Of course not. You want to put in high-octane performance fuel to get the most out of your investment.

When it comes to the brain, many people are looking for the top foods that will supercharge the brainpower to help focus better, think more clearly and have better brain health.

In this article, we’ll look at the top 9 brain foods that will help create supercharge your brain with energy and health:

1. Salmon

Salmon has long been held as a healthy brain food, but what makes this fish so valuable for your brain health?

It’s important to understand that your brain is primarily made up of fat. Roughly 60% of your brain is fat. One of the most important fats that the brain uses as a building block for healthy brain cells is omega-3’s.

Omega-3’s are essential for building a healthy brain but one of the most important omega-3’s for your brain is DHA. DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) forms nearly two-thirds of the omega-3’s found in your brain.[1]

Omega-3’s and DHA in particular help form the protective coating around our neurons. The better quality this coating is, the more efficient and effective our brain cells can work, allowing our brain power to work at full capacity.

Studies have shown that being deficient in DHA can affect normal brain development in children, which is why so many infant formulas and children’s supplements are beginning to include DHA.

Being deficient in DHA as an adult can cause focus and attention problems, mood swings, irritability, fatigue and poor sleep.

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2. Blueberries

Blueberries top the list as one of the most beneficial fruits to maximize your brain health and performance.

Blueberries have some of the highest content of antioxidants, particularly anthocyanins, than any other fruit, which helps protect the brain from stress and promote healthy brain aging.

Blueberries antioxidant content also help reduce inflammation, which allows the brain to maintain healthy energy levels.

Blueberries have begun to receive attention for their connection to brain performance.[2] Studies have demonstrated that eating blueberries on a regular basis can not only improve brain health but also brain performance as well including working memory.[3]

Blueberries not only taste great but are low in calories, high in Vitamin C, Vitamin K and Manganese.

3. Turmeric

Turmeric is a very impressive spice that has well-researched and proven to have tremendous benefits for your brain. Turmeric’s main compound that benefits the brain is called curcumin, which is responsible for turmerics bright yellow appearance.

Curcumin has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-cancer properties.[4]

Curcumin increases the production and availability of two important neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine, two important neurotransmitters involved with happiness, motivation, pleasure, and reward.

Curcumin has been well documented to have powerful anti-depressive effects. In one study, it was found to be as effective for depression as popular medications such as SSRI’s like Prozac.[5]

Curcumin has also been shown to:

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  • Increase blood flow to the brain.[6]
  • Increase BDNF production, a powerful stimulator of neuroplasticity.[7]
  • Increase DHA availability and synthesis in the brain.[8]
  • Increase antioxidant levels in the brain to prevent brain aging and inflammation.[9]

4. Coffee

Coffee is the wonderful elixir of energy that many people cherish every single morning. The biggest reason people drink coffee is to get a dose of caffeine.

Caffeine is a natural neurological stimulant that not only gives you energy but also prevents adenosine, a neurotransmitter involved with feeling tired, from binding in the brain.

Many people are surprised to find that coffee actually contains a large quantity of antioxidants called polyphenols, which are important for reducing inflammation in the brain and keep your brain energized. The antioxidants in coffee also provide a neuroprotective effect, protecting the brain from stress and damage. [R]

Coffee can also:

  • Improve alertness and concentration.[10]
  • Help with neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson’s disease.[11]
  • Reduce your risk of depression.[12]
  • Improve your memory.
  • Provide short-term boost in athletic performance.[13]

5. Broccoli

What was your least favorite food as a kid growing up?

Most likely, broccoli was your answer.

Broccoli may not have been your top choice, but it might be the top choice for your brain.

Broccoli contains a compound called sulforaphane. Sulforaphane has been shown to promote the proliferation and survival of brain cells by reducing inflammation and boosting production of BDNF. It has also been shown to boost neurogenesis, the production of new brain cells.[14]

Broccoli is also loaded with important nutrients Vitamin K and Folate. Vitamin K plays a vital role in protecting brain cells.[15] Folate plays a crucial role in detoxification and reducing inflammation in the brain.

6. Bone broth

Bone broth wasn’t just created to combine with soups, you can actually drink bone broth by itself.

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Drinking bone broth has become one of the biggest trends in the health and wellness industry and for good reason. Bone broth isn’t actually a new thing. Bone broth has been used for centuries as a healing tonic to promote health and longevity.

Much of the nutritional benefits and value of bone broth comes from its substantial vitamin and mineral content. Primarily calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium.

Your gut is called your second brain for a reason. Research continually shows that there is a direct and indirect connection between your gut and your brain. Your gut also houses and stores many important brain compounds involved with optimal brain performance. Therefore the health of your gut is vitally important for your brain health and performance.

Bone broth has become a go-to tool for helping heal the gut and provide the gut with the vital nutrient and resources it needs to heal and perform optimally.

With the vast amounts of nutrients that bone broth contains, it makes the list as a go-to food for your brain health.

Look for high quality, organic bone broth for the best results.

7. Walnuts

Walnuts are one of the top choices of nuts for brain health. Walnuts also look similar to a brain.

Amongst the wide variety of nuts available, walnuts contain the highest amounts of the important omega-3 DHA. DHA, as seen above, is a critical building block for a healthy brain.

Walnuts also contain high amounts of antioxidants, folate, magnesium, potassium, and phosphorus, which help to lower inflammation.

Melatonin in walnuts is an important nutrient for regulating your sleep. Having low amounts of melatonin can make it challenging to get good quality sleep and getting poor quality sleep can dramatically impair brain health and performance.

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8. Eggs

For years, eggs were put on the nutritional naughty list; but now, eggs are finally getting the credit they deserve. Eggs can provide a tremendous boost to your brain health and longevity.

Eggs, particularly the yolks, contain a compound called choline. Choline is essential for building the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Acetylcholine plays an important role in mood, memory, and intelligence.

Egg yolks contain some of the highest quantities of choline. This is very important because low levels of choline can lead to low levels of acetylcholine, which in turn can cause increased inflammation, brain fog, difficulty concentrating and fatigue.

9. Dark chocolate

You’re about to love chocolate even more because chocolate, particularly dark chocolate, is great for your brain.

Chocolate boosts levels of endorphins, your brains “feel good” chemicals. This is why you feel so good eating chocolate.[16]

Chocolate also increases blood flow to the brain which can help improve memory, attention, focus, and reaction time.[17]

Dark chocolate contains high levels of magnesium, which has been coined “natures valium” for its ability to calm and relax the brain.

Lastly, dark chocolate has one of the highest antioxidant profiles out of any other food, including popular superfoods like acai berries, blueberries, or pomegranates.[18]

Conclusion

Your brain is a high performing organ and it uses quite a lot of energy, roughly 20% of the bodies energy demands.

In order to maintain a healthy brain, you need the right fuel to ensure that your brain has all the nutrients it needs to perform as well as adapt to the stress of life.

If you want to keep your brain performing well for a lifetime, then you want to make sure you are including as many of these brain health foods as possible.

More Resources About Boosting Brain Power

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health: DHA Effects in Brain Development and Function
[2] Canadian Science Publishing: Enhanced task-related brain activation and resting perfusion in healthy older adults after chronic blueberry supplementation
[3] US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health: Cognitive effects following acute wild blueberry supplementation in 7- to 10-year-old children.
[4] US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health: Curcumin: the Indian solid gold.
[5] Herbal Medicine: Biomolecular and Clinical Aspects. 2nd edition.: Turmeric, the Golden Spice
[6] US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health: Effect of combined treatment with curcumin and candesartan on ischemic brain damage in mice.
[7] Science Direct: Curcumin reverses the effects of chronic stress on behavior, the HPA axis, BDNF expression and phosphorylation of CREB
[8] US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health: Curcumin boosts DHA in the brain: Implications for the prevention of anxiety disorders.
[9] PLOS: A Chemical Analog of Curcumin as an Improved Inhibitor of Amyloid Abeta Oligomerization
[10] US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health: Effects of Caffeine on Cognitive Performance, Mood, and Alertness in Sleep-Deprived Humans
[11] American Academy of Neurology: A Cup of Joe May Help Some Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms
[12] American Academy of Neurology: AAN 65th Annual Meeting Abstract
[13] US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health: Effects of caffeine on the metabolic and catecholamine responses to exercise in 5 and 28 degrees C.
[14] US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health: Hyperammonemia induces glial activation, neuroinflammation and alters neurotransmitter receptors in hippocampus, impairing spatial learning: reversal by sulforaphane
[15] Oxford Academic: Vitamin K and the Nervous System: An Overview of its Actions
[16] Diana L. Walcutt, Ph.D: Chocolate and Mood Disorders
[17] Health Magazine: Chocolate can do good things for your heart, skin and brain
[18] Chemistry Central Journal: Cacao seeds are a “Super Fruit”: A comparative analysis of various fruit powders and products

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