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12 Health ‘Facts’ You Have Believed Are Actually Misleading

12 Health ‘Facts’ You Have Believed Are Actually Misleading

Our parents would have us believe many health myths when we were younger. Most of which we would assume to be right for a very long time because as kids, we trusted that the adults were always right, or so we thought. Appendicitis and jumping around after eating was one of those myths that have been preached widely everywhere and guess what? They were wrong all along. To know more about those health myths that we were being misled about all these while, read on below for 12 health ‘fact’s you have believed which are actually misleading.

1. Microwaves Gives You Cancer

We’ve got older generation folks avoid using microwaves because they believe it can give cancer. But according to Cancer Research UK, microwaves only heat food and nothing more. Old folks will have you believe that microwaves can destroy the nutritional value of food but other forms of heating food, such as boiling, baking and grilling also does the same thing.

2. The 5 Second Rule Keeps Food Clean To Eat

We’ve all been guilty of picking food up again from the table and eating it as long as it’s within 5 seconds from dropping it. But it actually depends more on how clean the surface of where you drop your food is. The Mythbusters once put this to the test and found out that once your food hits a dirty surface, it would have been contaminated in milliseconds.

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3. Milk Is Good For You

Milk has long been associated with strong bones and healthy teeth but according to the Medical Research Journal, high milk intake is also associated with a higher mortality rate among men and women and higher fracture cases in women.

4. Consuming Chocolate Gives You Acne

Chocolate has also long been known as a cause of acne. But a medical experiment posted in the Journal of the American Medical Association conducted showed that chocolate did not have an effect on zits. One group which was involved in the experiment was given candy bars with 10 times amount of chocolate and the other was given fake chocolate bars. The results showed that there was no increase in zits in the group given real chocolate as compared to the other group.

5. Eating An Apple A Day Helps Keep The Doctor Away 

Apples are known for its vitamin C and fibre but according to research, an apple can do nothing to help if a bacteria or a virus gets into your system. Only a flu shot has a higher chance of protecting you.

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6. Jumping After A Meal Doesn’t Give You Appendicitis

You probably have always believed that jumping and running after a meal will give you an appendicitis which is the inflammation of the appendicitis. But research says that this is not true. An appendicitis is caused when a hard piece of stool obstructs the very small opening of the appendix which leads to swelling, inflammation and infection.

7. Take Vitamins To Stay Healthy

Multivitamins are a billion dollar business but scientists are now saying that they are virtually ineffective to reduce the risk of any diseases and could be causing more harm than good. According to a journal posted in Scientific American, clinical trials done on people taking vitamin E, high doses of Vitamin A and beta-carotene actually increases death rates.

8. Sugar Is Addictive Like Cocaine

Ever saw a parody when a guy goes sneefing sugar like it’s cocaine and then goes on feeling “high”? In real life, most actually do believe that sugar can become addictive like cocaine but as research has shown us, although sugar lights up parts of the brain similar to when we are having sex or taking cocaine, there is no evidence yet to show that it is addictive. In fact, scientists haven’t had a clue as to what addiction is like in the brain.

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9. With A Lack Of Oxygen, Your Blood Turns Blue

This is absolutely untrue because blood will never turn blue. It only becomes dark red when it’s not carrying enough oxygen. An article on Scienceline also tells us that you could also be looking at your blueish veins and also the color red could be filtered to become blue because there are so many layers beneath the skin of which you are looking through.

10. Eating Carrots Allows You To See At Night

Vitamin A is great for our eyes and carrots have an abundance of it but if you think that eating lots of carrots can give you great night vision, then you will be very disappointed. Apparently, this myth was created as propaganda by the British hoping to mask away the new development of the radar and in hopes to trick the Nazis by saying that carrots have helped the British to “see” German planes flying in.

11. Cracking Knuckles Can Give You Arthritis 

Sorry, this is not true as well. A research posted in the Journal of the American Board of Medicine clearly shows that there is no co-relation between Knuckle cracking and Arthritis. Subjects who knuckle crack and subjects who don’t were still getting arthritis for their age groups of 50 – 89 years old.

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12. Diabetes Is Caused By High Sugar Intake

Sugar is definitely not the main cause for diabetes because the disease is such a complex one. However, The American Diabetes Association had stated that weight gain and consuming too much sugary drinks are associated with a higher risk. So there’s not much to worry for people who eat sugar in moderation because there is simply no direct evidence to say that sugar causes diabetes and there is no need to completely cut sugar off from your diet.

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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