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The Ultimate Guide To London’s Street Food

The Ultimate Guide To London’s Street Food

The streets of London are alive with food. From sizzling steaks to tasty Thai, nifty Nigerian pop-ups to charming cream teas, the capital is brimming with amazing street food vendors just waiting to tickle your tastebuds.

We’ve just come across this brilliant new guide to London’s street food scene, developed by the travel experts at Expedia. To whet your appetite, we’ve picked 10 of our favourites. Read on, get hungry, explore the guide, then go out for food!

Leather Lane, Farringdon

In a nutshell: Incredibly popular with workers through the week, this amazingly diverse market sits on the edge of the city, with St. Paul’s as a backdrop and the well-known and much-loved Smithfield Market just a short walk away.

Where to eat: Where to start? Try Boom Burger for amazing Jamaican grills and scintillating Spanish fare over at Embutique. There’s Thai at Kin, Mexican at Daddy Donkey, and, if you’re not hungry, a few food and clothes stalls smattered around.

What to do: After filling up, experience some of the best London has to offer. St. Paul’s, the Dickens Museum, and the Museum of London are all in the neighbourhood.

Hawker House, Canada Water

In a nutshell: London’s best-kept street food secret? Possibly. This Street Feast market, near Canada Water in south London, features 14 vendors across 2 floors of food heaven.

Where to eat: Amazing seafood at Prawnography, mind-blowing Mexican at Breddos Tacos, and Korean delights at Kimchinary.

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What to do: Go for a Thameside walk, visit the historic Mayflower pub, see the animals at Surrey Docks Farm, or experience some culture at CPG Gallery.

Broadway Market, Hackney

In a nutshell: A brilliant food market in one of London’s most exciting areas, Hackney. Broadway Market’s roots can be traced back to the 1890s when it acted as a drover’s route into the city. Today, it’s one of the best places for street food in the capital.

Where to eat: Greek treats at Isle of Olive, grab a haggis toastie from Deeney’s, and check out the Indonesian food at Makatcha.

What to do: Head to London Fields and the Regent’s Canal for a peaceful stroll. Pop over for a tipple at London Fields Brewery.

Street Food Union, Soho

In a nutshell: A fun time is assured at Street Food Union. Set in one of London’s most hectic districts, it offers an incredibly diverse range of food with historic theatreland all around you.

Where to eat: For super-healthy salads packed with flavour, try Radical Roots. Dixie Union is fried, Deep South heaven, and, if you’re a fan of Polish food, check out Pyrlandia.

What to do: Shaftesbury Avenue and the world of London’s theatre scene are a mere stone’s throw away. Enjoy a night of jazz at Ronnie Scott’s. The Tower of London and Tower Bridge are fairly nearby too.

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Partridges Food Market, Chelsea

In a nutshell: Every Saturday, Chelsea’s Duke of York Square plays host to Partridges, where around 70 vendors rock up to show off their wares. It’s great for home-grown produce and artisanal foods.

Where to eat: Amazing Argentinian fare abounds at Chango Empanadas. More South American goodness can be found at the Peruvian place Panka.

What to do: Shop in London’s high-end retail district. For the green-fingered among you, there’s Chelsea Physic — the oldest botanic garden in London. The contemporary art of the Saatchi Gallery is also close by.

Old Spitalfields Market, Shoreditch

In a nutshell: Immerse yourself in history at Old Spitalfields — it’s been going since way back in 1682. Today, just a stone’s throw from Brick Lane, this Grade-1-listed building has everything and more.

Where to eat: Probably the best burger in London is available at Bleecker Burger. Jamaican delights are everywhere at Cafe Caribbean. Or simply wander around and let your nose decide.

What to do: Brick Lane, with its vintage stores, bagel shops, and plethora of curry houses, is a must. Whitechapel Gallery is close by, and a little further afield sits the Westfield shopping centre.

Exmouth Market, Clerkenwell

In a nutshell: Just up the road from Leather Lane, Exmouth Market is a hive of wonderful street food and cute little coffee shops.

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Where to eat: Go Ghanaian at Spinach & Agushi, sample amazing salt beef at Nana Fanny’s, and sample the Mexican fare at Freebird Burritos.

What to do: Sadler’s Wells Theatre is just round the corner, the Charles Dickens Museum is close by, and the Barbican, London’s world-class cultural space, is a 20-minute walk away.

Borough Market, London Bridge

In a nutshell: This of London’s oldest (its origins date back to 1040) and best-known food markets. Exceptionally popular with tourists, and therefore exceptionally busy, it’s a great place to go for quality meat, veg, and coffee.

Where to eat: Mediterranean vendor Gourmet Goat is exceptional, sample some amazing cheeses from Alsop & Walker, and enjoy the finest Italian meats from De Calabria.

What to do: The Thames is a short walk away, where you’ll find the Globe Theatre. Tate Modern is in the neighbourhood too.

Portobello Market, Notting Hill

In a nutshell: Another of London’s famous markets, Portobello is known for its antiques, but it does some neat grub too, with well-known and independent traders rubbing shoulders.

Where to eat: Proper paella at Jamon Jamon, fried everything at Poptata, and the Swedish bakery Fabrique is amazing.

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What to do: If you’re in the area at the right time, you could experience the sights and sounds of Notting Hill Carnival. Strawberry Hill castle is a prime example of Georgian architecture and Kensington Palace is a must.

Southbank Centre Food Market

In a nutshell: Go round the back of the Royal Festival Hall for this brilliant food market, featuring vendors from all over the world.

Where to eat: There’s veggie Indian street food at Horn Ok Please, quality meats at Spit & Roast, and cool craft beers at The Hop Locker.

What to do: Aside from the Southbank Centre itself, the London Eye is a stroll away, the Millennium Bridge gets you to the other side of the river, and Tower Bridge is in the area.

Explore the guide and tell us about your favourite street food in London!

Featured photo credit: Dalston Yard Street Feast via streetfeast.com

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

    Why You Need a Vision

    Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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    How to Create Your Life Vision

    Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

    What Do You Want?

    The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

    It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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    Some tips to guide you:

    • Remember to ask why you want certain things
    • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
    • Give yourself permission to dream.
    • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
    • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

    Some questions to start your exploration:

    • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
    • What would you like to have more of in your life?
    • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
    • What are your secret passions and dreams?
    • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
    • What do you want your relationships to be like?
    • What qualities would you like to develop?
    • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
    • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
    • What would you most like to accomplish?
    • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

    It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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    What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

    Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

    A few prompts to get you started:

    • What will you have accomplished already?
    • How will you feel about yourself?
    • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
    • What does your ideal day look like?
    • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
    • What would you be doing?
    • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
    • How are you dressed?
    • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
    • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
    • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

    It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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    Plan Backwards

    It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

    • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
    • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
    • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
    • What important actions would you have had to take?
    • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
    • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
    • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
    • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
    • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

    Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

    It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

    Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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