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The Ultimate Guide To London’s Street Food

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The Ultimate Guide To London’s Street Food

The streets of London are alive with food. From sizzling steaks to tasty Thai, nifty Nigerian pop-ups to charming cream teas, the capital is brimming with amazing street food vendors just waiting to tickle your tastebuds.

We’ve just come across this brilliant new guide to London’s street food scene, developed by the travel experts at Expedia. To whet your appetite, we’ve picked 10 of our favourites. Read on, get hungry, explore the guide, then go out for food!

Leather Lane, Farringdon

In a nutshell: Incredibly popular with workers through the week, this amazingly diverse market sits on the edge of the city, with St. Paul’s as a backdrop and the well-known and much-loved Smithfield Market just a short walk away.

Where to eat: Where to start? Try Boom Burger for amazing Jamaican grills and scintillating Spanish fare over at Embutique. There’s Thai at Kin, Mexican at Daddy Donkey, and, if you’re not hungry, a few food and clothes stalls smattered around.

What to do: After filling up, experience some of the best London has to offer. St. Paul’s, the Dickens Museum, and the Museum of London are all in the neighbourhood.

Hawker House, Canada Water

In a nutshell: London’s best-kept street food secret? Possibly. This Street Feast market, near Canada Water in south London, features 14 vendors across 2 floors of food heaven.

Where to eat: Amazing seafood at Prawnography, mind-blowing Mexican at Breddos Tacos, and Korean delights at Kimchinary.

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What to do: Go for a Thameside walk, visit the historic Mayflower pub, see the animals at Surrey Docks Farm, or experience some culture at CPG Gallery.

Broadway Market, Hackney

In a nutshell: A brilliant food market in one of London’s most exciting areas, Hackney. Broadway Market’s roots can be traced back to the 1890s when it acted as a drover’s route into the city. Today, it’s one of the best places for street food in the capital.

Where to eat: Greek treats at Isle of Olive, grab a haggis toastie from Deeney’s, and check out the Indonesian food at Makatcha.

What to do: Head to London Fields and the Regent’s Canal for a peaceful stroll. Pop over for a tipple at London Fields Brewery.

Street Food Union, Soho

In a nutshell: A fun time is assured at Street Food Union. Set in one of London’s most hectic districts, it offers an incredibly diverse range of food with historic theatreland all around you.

Where to eat: For super-healthy salads packed with flavour, try Radical Roots. Dixie Union is fried, Deep South heaven, and, if you’re a fan of Polish food, check out Pyrlandia.

What to do: Shaftesbury Avenue and the world of London’s theatre scene are a mere stone’s throw away. Enjoy a night of jazz at Ronnie Scott’s. The Tower of London and Tower Bridge are fairly nearby too.

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Partridges Food Market, Chelsea

In a nutshell: Every Saturday, Chelsea’s Duke of York Square plays host to Partridges, where around 70 vendors rock up to show off their wares. It’s great for home-grown produce and artisanal foods.

Where to eat: Amazing Argentinian fare abounds at Chango Empanadas. More South American goodness can be found at the Peruvian place Panka.

What to do: Shop in London’s high-end retail district. For the green-fingered among you, there’s Chelsea Physic — the oldest botanic garden in London. The contemporary art of the Saatchi Gallery is also close by.

Old Spitalfields Market, Shoreditch

In a nutshell: Immerse yourself in history at Old Spitalfields — it’s been going since way back in 1682. Today, just a stone’s throw from Brick Lane, this Grade-1-listed building has everything and more.

Where to eat: Probably the best burger in London is available at Bleecker Burger. Jamaican delights are everywhere at Cafe Caribbean. Or simply wander around and let your nose decide.

What to do: Brick Lane, with its vintage stores, bagel shops, and plethora of curry houses, is a must. Whitechapel Gallery is close by, and a little further afield sits the Westfield shopping centre.

Exmouth Market, Clerkenwell

In a nutshell: Just up the road from Leather Lane, Exmouth Market is a hive of wonderful street food and cute little coffee shops.

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Where to eat: Go Ghanaian at Spinach & Agushi, sample amazing salt beef at Nana Fanny’s, and sample the Mexican fare at Freebird Burritos.

What to do: Sadler’s Wells Theatre is just round the corner, the Charles Dickens Museum is close by, and the Barbican, London’s world-class cultural space, is a 20-minute walk away.

Borough Market, London Bridge

In a nutshell: This of London’s oldest (its origins date back to 1040) and best-known food markets. Exceptionally popular with tourists, and therefore exceptionally busy, it’s a great place to go for quality meat, veg, and coffee.

Where to eat: Mediterranean vendor Gourmet Goat is exceptional, sample some amazing cheeses from Alsop & Walker, and enjoy the finest Italian meats from De Calabria.

What to do: The Thames is a short walk away, where you’ll find the Globe Theatre. Tate Modern is in the neighbourhood too.

Portobello Market, Notting Hill

In a nutshell: Another of London’s famous markets, Portobello is known for its antiques, but it does some neat grub too, with well-known and independent traders rubbing shoulders.

Where to eat: Proper paella at Jamon Jamon, fried everything at Poptata, and the Swedish bakery Fabrique is amazing.

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What to do: If you’re in the area at the right time, you could experience the sights and sounds of Notting Hill Carnival. Strawberry Hill castle is a prime example of Georgian architecture and Kensington Palace is a must.

Southbank Centre Food Market

In a nutshell: Go round the back of the Royal Festival Hall for this brilliant food market, featuring vendors from all over the world.

Where to eat: There’s veggie Indian street food at Horn Ok Please, quality meats at Spit & Roast, and cool craft beers at The Hop Locker.

What to do: Aside from the Southbank Centre itself, the London Eye is a stroll away, the Millennium Bridge gets you to the other side of the river, and Tower Bridge is in the area.

Explore the guide and tell us about your favourite street food in London!

Featured photo credit: Dalston Yard Street Feast via streetfeast.com

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Last Updated on August 12, 2021

Learn How To Make Coffee 38 Different Ways With This Stunning Guide

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Learn How To Make Coffee 38 Different Ways With This Stunning Guide

 

If you make your own coffee in the morning, chances are you’re only making the same boring kind everyday. Now it’s time to put an end to the cynical habit and turn you into an instant coffee connoisseur.

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The only difference here is taste. And when it comes to coffee, taste matters. A lot.

Most of the methods and ingredients from the chart above dates back hundreds of years and have been traditionally passed down from generation to generation. Hence, it’s actually possible to tell where a person came from based on the type of coffee he or she drinks!

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