Advertising
Advertising

Why Canada Is Perfect For Retirement

Why Canada Is Perfect For Retirement

Retirement is something we all stay frustrated since the time where being an adult means responsibility. While some say not everyone is meant to make money, I firmly believe that everyone is meant to make money if they’re willing to go through the hurdles of the unthinkable. We strive to enjoy a perfect retirement, we place our payments in all forms of retirement plans and we ensure to have a secure future when we have reached the point of utter serenity.

However, while the Millennials may negate the prospects of retirement, many people still enjoy the comfort of finding the perfect country to live and enjoy their time.

Canada is one of the countries which is perfect for anyone who’s planning to retire. Its ambiance and its diversified nature allow one to relax as well as participate in various activities that will serve as a memorable experience. Here are a few reasons that show why Canada is a perfect destination for anyone who’s planning to retire.

Advertising

A sign is displayed in front of Health Canada headquarters in Ottawa on Friday, January 3, 2014. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

    1. A Great Place with Great Health Plans.

    The biggest concern many have is that as you age, medical expenses gets higher and higher. You take up insurances and other forms of bonds to ensure that in our old age medical expenses and bills wouldn’t be a problem; in the sense that in the future many would still be able to have a decent living despite the medical expenses.

    Over the years, America has proven to have one of the most expensive health care system, despite the enactment of Obamacare many people still can’t afford any basic health care. The reason is, America’s concept of health care despite all leeways is based on your income instead of necessity. On the contrary, like many countries, Canada provides health care based on your necessity.

    Your insurance, as well as basic social security, will definitely be enough for you to receive all the necessary medications as well as treatments needed. The ultimate importance for anyone is their health and that’s something you can be sure of to receive in Canada.

    vermillion-lakes-sunrise-banff-alberta-x3

      2. Amazing Scenery, Perfect for Adventures.

      When you do retire, the first thoughts that come to your mind is what can you splurge on? You have all the time and the finances, you have the energy required and you have all the motivation necessary to make your retirement an amazing experience. They say that 65 is the new 25, hence you definitely are looking forward to an adventurous retirement.

      Advertising

      While bureaucracy is something to be mesmerized by, in Canada, however, their nature and history offers the same amount of amazement or even more. Their history of the French revolution stays strongly embedded in the corners of Quebec. Being part of the UNESCO heritage it offers the finest culture and shows the evolution of the French cuisine. However, if you stop by the empires of the British Columbia region, you would be able to be your own English person. Enjoying the finest of teas and the most delicious cakes. For some, it might bring you back to your roots.

      For the adventurous and highly spirited people, the National parks, especially the Banff national park will serve as an adventure. You will be able to find various wildlife and enjoy a nice hike up the limestones. If you’re a fan of winter sports, then never forget to take your ski’s with you. The view from Mount Norquay is something you wouldn’t want to miss.

      It’s the best of both worlds one would say.

      canada-is-still-racist-1413323908337-crop_desktop

        3. The Huge Amount of Diversity.

        Personally, being from a family of multiple races, I find diversity a crucial part of my habitat. This same principle lies within my parents too, who are looking forward to retirement. A twist in culture and the sheer acceptance of being difference can create a great bridge. After retirement, the last issue you would want to be worried about would be living in a country with conflicts of interest and differences.

        Advertising

        Canada becomes the perfect nestling point as cultural differences are celebrated instead of being prejudiced. If you’re the type of person who enjoys having “chai” for breakfast and “sushi” for lunch, then this would be the perfect place for you. The balance of culture allows you to explore different people from a unique perspective. This form of diversity gives you the bonus of indulging yourself in various festivities and being one with the nation.

        Prejudice is a strong word, however, being in Canada you would feel more at home than anywhere else because prejudice has been a minimalist perspective in that country. You will be able to enjoy peacefulness and serenity with a complete stranger, therefore perfecting your retiring experience.

        Wouldn’t you want to experience this again?

        Advertising

        c_scalefl_progressiveq_80w_800

          4. Food Will Never Be the Same Again.

          Food is an essential part of everyone’s life. The emotions it triggers and the security it provides gives you the feeling of a free-flying bird, Good food can provide one with the comfort and substance that one can’t experience otherwise. We work hard and reach the point of retirement to explore the comforts of fine foods as well as traditional cuisine.

          History has shown how food has influenced Canada to a point that it became a significant part of their identity. If you’re a fan of maple syrup, then Canada is the place for you. With their emblem of the Maple tree, they’re one of the largest producers of the finest maple syrup. On the other hand, you will be able to find the best “Game” meat as well as exquisite cheese to be paired with your food.

          Prince Edwards Island will be able to offer you an array of fine seafood, right of the harbor whilst also allowing you to enjoy the seldom popping up of whales. It will definitely be an experience you wouldn’t want to miss.

          In Conclusion,

          For anyone who’s looking for a calm yet adventure-filled place to live their retirement period, then Canada offers just that. If you envision yourself experiencing a blissful lifestyle, then definitely have Canada as one of your choices.

          More by this author

          How to Have the Best Spring With Your Pets 5 Ways to Enjoy Festivals With Pets 5 Best Islands To Definitely Visit In 2017 How Canada Is A Perfect Place For Holidays How To Keep Your Pets Warm In Winter.

          Trending in Brain

          1 What Is Unconscious Bias (And How to Reduce It for Good) 2 What is Cognitive Dissonance (And How to Dodge it) 3 How Do Memory Vitamins Work? (And the Best Brain Supplements) 4 How Not to Let Cognitive Bias Control Us When Dealing with COVID-19 5 7 Most Effective Problem Solving Techniques That Smart People Use

          Read Next

          Advertising
          Advertising
          Advertising

          Published on June 30, 2020

          What Is Unconscious Bias (And How to Reduce It for Good)

          What Is Unconscious Bias (And How to Reduce It for Good)

          Many conversations are being held nowadays regarding unconscious bias, but what does it really mean and how can it affect your life and the people around you? With many types of biases, it can get quite confusing. In this article, we’ll touch on cognitive bias, and then zero in on unconscious bias. Both types of biases have an immediate impact on your life because they relate to how you and others think about yourself and other people.

          If you want to protect your relationships and make good decisions about other people, you need to know what these biases mean[1]. Once we have clarity about that, we can explore in more depth unconscious bias and how to address it[2].

          Cognitive Bias

          Let’s start with cognitive bias[3], a predictable pattern of mental errors that result in us misperceiving reality and, as a result, deviating away from the most likely way of reaching our goals[4].

          These mental blind spots impact all areas of our life, from health to relationships and even shopping, as a study recently revealed[5]. In other words, from the perspective of what is best for us as individuals, falling for a cognitive bias always harms us by lowering our probability of getting what we want.

          Cognitive biases have to do with judgment, not mood. Ironically, cognitive biases — such as the optimism bias and overconfidence effect — more often lead to positive moods. Of course, the consequence of falling into cognitive biases, once discovered, usually leaves us in a bad mood due to the disastrous results of these dangerous judgment errors.

          Advertising

          Unconscious Bias

          Unconscious bias is different from cognitive bias. Also known as implicit bias, it refers to unconscious forms of discrimination and stereotyping based on race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, ability, age, and so on[6]. Despite cognitive biases sometimes leading to discriminatory thinking and feeling patterns, these are two separate and distinct concepts.

          Cognitive biases are common across humankind and relate to the particular wiring of our brains, while unconscious bias relates to perceptions between different groups and are specific for the society in which we live. For example, I bet you don’t care or even think about whether someone is a noble or a commoner, yet that distinction was fundamentally important a few centuries ago across Europe. To take another example, most people in the US don’t have strong feelings about Sunni vs. Shiite Muslims, yet this distinction is incredibly meaningful in many parts of the world.

          Unconscious Bias and Discriminatory Behavior

          Organizations often bring me in as a speaker on diversity and inclusion to address potential unconscious discriminatory behavior. When I share in speeches that black Americans suffer from police harassment and violence at a much higher rate than white people, some participants (usually white) occasionally try to defend the police by claiming that black people are more violent and likely to break the law than whites. They thus attribute police harassment to the internal characteristics of black people (implying that it is deserved), and not to the external context of police behavior.

          In reality – as I point out in my response to these folks – research shows that black people are harassed and harmed by police at a much higher rate for the same kind of activity. A white person walking by a cop, for example, is statistically much less likely to be stopped and frisked than a black one[7].

          At the other end of things, a white person resisting arrest is much less likely to be violently beaten than a black one. In other words, statistics show that the higher rate of harassment and violence against black Americans by police is due to the prejudice of the police officers, at least to a large extent[8].

          Advertising

          However, I am careful to clarify that this discrimination is not necessarily intentional. Sometimes, it indeed is deliberate, with white police officers consciously believing that black Americans deserve much more scrutiny than whites. At other times, the discriminatory behavior results from unconscious, implicit thought processes that the police officer would not consciously endorse[9].

          After becoming aware that unconscious bias does exist, the next step would be learning how to recognize it in order to reduce it. I’ve outlined three crucial points to keep in mind below while further exploring the unconscious prejudice discussed above.

          How to Reduce Unconscious Bias

          Remember these three important points if you want to work on reducing your unconscious bias.

          1. Unconscious Bias is a Systemic Issue

          When we understand that unconscious bias is ultimately a systemic issue, we understand that internal cultures need to be checked and addressed first.

          Interestingly, research shows that many black police officers have an unconscious prejudice against other black people, perceiving them in a more negative light than white people when evaluating potential suspects. This unconscious bias carried by many — not all — black police officers helps show that such prejudices come – at least to a significant extent – from internal cultures within police departments, rather than pre-existing racist attitudes present before someone joins a police department.

          Advertising

          Such cultures are perpetuated by internal norms, policies, and training procedures, and any police department wishing to address unconscious bias needs to address internal culture first and foremost, rather than attributing racism to individual officers.

          In other words, instead of saying it’s a few bad apples in a barrel of overall good ones, the key is recognizing that unconscious bias is a systemic issue, and the structure and joints of the barrel needs to be fixed[10].

          2. There Is No Shame in Unconscious Bias

          Another crucial thing that needs to be highlighted is that there is no shame or blame in unconscious bias as it’s not stemming from any fault in the individual. This no-shame approach decreases the fight, freeze, or flight defensive response among reluctant audiences, helping them hear and accept the issue.

          Unconscious bias is prevalent and often doesn’t match our conscious values. Everyone holds unconscious beliefs and prejudices stemming from our tendency to categorize people into social groups. This developed naturally as a way for our ancestors to quickly size up a possible threat. Unfortunately, it doesn’t translate well in modern life.

          3. It Takes a Sustained Effort to Prevent and Protect Against Unconscious Bias

          After being presented with additional statistics and discussion of unconscious bias, the issue is generally settled. Still, from their subsequent behavior it’s clear that some of these audience members don’t immediately internalize this evidence. It’s much more comforting for their gut reactions to believe that police officers are right and anyone targeted by police deserves it; in turn, they are highly reluctant to accept the need to focus more efforts and energy on protecting black Americans from police violence due to the structural challenges facing these groups.

          Advertising

          The issue of unconscious bias doesn’t match their intuitions, so they reject this concept, despite extensive and strong evidence for its pervasive role in policing. It takes a series of subsequent follow-up conversations and interventions to move the needle. A single training is almost never sufficient, both in my experience and according to research[11].

          Conclusion

          The examples and points raised illustrate broader patterns you need to follow to recognize unconscious bias. Only by doing so will you be able to determine if, and what type of, intervention is needed to address it.

          Unfortunately, our gut reactions lead us to make poor judgment choices when we simply follow our intuitions. Unconscious biases are systemic and need to be addressed in order to make the best decisions[12].

          We need to learn about the kind of problems that result from unconscious bias. Then, you need to develop the right mental habits to help you make the best choices[13]. A one-time training is insufficient for doing so. It takes a long-term commitment and constant discipline and efforts to overcome unconscious bias, so get started now.

          More Tips on Overcoming Unconscious Bias

          Featured photo credit: M.T ElGassier via unsplash.com

          Reference

          Read Next