Advertising
Advertising

9 Tips to Prepare For Your First Multi Day Hike

9 Tips to Prepare For Your First Multi Day Hike

Whether you have your sights set on hiking a national park or simply spending a long weekend on the trail, preparation and planning are both extremely important. Starting a hike without the proper food, equipment, medical supplies, and information can result in an extremely negative experience. At best, you’ll have a miserable time. At worst, you can put your well being at risk, even your life.

When done correctly, multi day hikes can be amazing experiences. You’ll see nature up close and personal, create memories, and possibly meet some interesting people on your treks. By following the 9 tips below, you can help ensure that your hiking trip is a success.

1. Research The Area You’ll be Hiking

Be sure you have accurate and up to date information on the areas where you’ll be hiking. You’ll want to know what to expect as far as weather, trail closures, and rules and regulations. Start by checking out the official information. This means visiting national park services websites, reading guidebooks, and learning the rules and recommendations put out by your local department of natural resources or department of conservation.

You can use that information to begin to plan your trip and map your hike. Your next step is to get the unofficial take on things. Look for community forums and discussion groups that have been formed by hikers and campers familiar to your chosen area. These are great sources for the kind of unofficial information that you won’t find through other sources. For example, experienced hikers may know of landowners along your path who will let you refill your canteen from their spigot or where some edible plants are accessible.

Advertising

2. Start Challenging Your Physical Limits

Packing around 30 to 50 pounds of gear is tough for a day. Doing it for two or more days, fatigue quickly becomes an issue if you aren’t prepared. Don’t wait for your long trek to see what your body can endure. Start challenging yourself today. Hit the gym and spend lots of time on the stair climber. Then, ask a trainer for help learning exercises that strengthen your core and your legs. You’ll need this in order to build up both strength and endurance.

On the other hand, be cautious. If you’re the bodybuilding type, you may be used to focusing on getting your gains at the gym. Now is not the time for that. If anything, consider trimming down a bit. It may help to focus on a workout routine designed for endurance athletes.

3. Take Special Care of Your Feet

It’s one thing to have to nurse a blister after a day of hiking. It’s a special kind of hell to deal with blisters and sore feet in the middle of a national park miles and miles away from civilization. Next to your brain, your feet are the most important body part when it comes to hiking. Take care of them.

Invest in a dedicated pair of hiking boots. Then, use them. Take them on several shorter hikes. You don’t want to start a long hike in a pair of boots that aren’t broken in. Next, buy several pairs of socks that are specifically designed for hiking and mountaineering. Merino wool socks are very popular amongst hikers these days. Here are some features that would make for a great pair of hiking socks:.

Advertising

  • They Provide Adequate Cushioning
  • They Wick Moisture Away From Your Feet
  • They Are Warm Without Being Overly Thick
  • They Are Breathable in Hot Weather

Some people recommend changing socks once daily. However, you should probably plan on changing more often if your feet sweat or if you are hiking in hot conditions.

4. Consider Investing in Lighter Gear

If you’re planning to hike for multiple days, you’ll have to add lots of new gear to your pack. This includes cooking equipment, sleeping bag, tent, and more clothing. That means adding more weight. You might be able to handle that for a day or two if you are in good shape, but it will take its toll as the days pass.

It  may be a good idea to invest the money in some lighter gear that is specifically designed for multi day hiking trips. You’ll be grateful, even if you can reduce  your overall load by just ten pounds.

5. Invest in a Good Navigation System

First, never start a hike without grabbing a copy of the trail map. If you have an equipment or battery failure, this could be a real life saver. You should also invest in a waterproof carrying case for that map. Having said that, it is more than worth the money you will spend to get a GPS system or app that is specifically designed for hikers. These durable pieces of equipment can help you navigate the toughest areas, and can withstand a lot of abuse.

Advertising

6. Make a Hydration Plan

When you plan your trip, it is of utmost importance that you make a plan to stay properly hydrated. Remember that you can’t simply throw a bunch of water bottles in your backpack. If you do carry water, it’s a good idea to invest in a hydration vest or belt. This allows you to carry the water you have more ergonomically.

Then, map out places where you can refill or otherwise replenish your water supply. If you aren’t certain that there will be potable water sources, it’s time to invest in a water filtration straw or purification tablets. If you are hiking in especially demanding surroundings, it may help to bring along some powdered sports drink mix.

7. Be Prepared to Pack Out What You Pack In

Good environmental stewardship is the responsibility of every hiker, camper, mountaineer, or backpacker. This mean that everything you bring along with you on your hike should come back off of the trail when you finish your hike. This includes food waste. Don’t leave it assuming that the animals will devour it. That’s not healthy for them, and it gives them a taste for human food which can be dangerous for them and other hikers.

8. Plan Your Meals to Optimize Nutrition And Avoid Waste

One good rule of thumb to keep in mind is ‘fresh food first’. If you have fantasies of roasting hot dogs over a fire, or preparing a camper’s breakfast with pancakes, eggs, and all the trimmings, that’s fine. Just plan your menu so that any perishable items are eaten first.

Advertising

If you’re thru hiking, fresh food may not be an option. Instead, you’ll want to rely on dehydrated or freeze dried foods. These are sold in packs at outdoor and camping supply stores. If you have your own food dehydrator, there are plenty of trail meal recipes online.

9. Have a Plan And Equipment in Place For Illness or Injury

Never hike without a proper first aid kit. If you are hiking long distances, you’ll want to invest in even more supplies than you would normally bring along. Also, bring cash with you. This will allow you to replace any times that you use up when you make your way into campgrounds or towns. Finally, if you decide to hike alone, please invest in a personal location beacon.

Overnight and thru hiking can be amazing experiences. Keep the tips above in mind so that you can get the most out of each hiking trip.

Featured photo credit: David Marcu via unsplash.com

More by this author

Elena Prokopets

Freelance Writer

22 Amazing Pineapple Health Benefits (With Simple Pineapple Recipes) 15 Cool And Practical Apps For Couples 14 Things No One Tells You About Being in a Long-Distance Relationship 9 Tips to Prepare For Your First Multi Day Hike 10 Tips For Traveling in Europe With Class on a Budget

Trending in Lifestyle

1Science Says Screaming Is Good For You 2What Really Works: How to Relieve Lower Back Pain Effectively 310 Benefits of Sleeping Naked You Probably Didn’t Know 47 Super Fast Remedies for a Pulled Muscle in Neck 56 Compelling Reasons to Try Couples Yoga (And the Best Poses to Try)

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Science Says Screaming Is Good For You

Science Says Screaming Is Good For You

There are many reasons why people might scream – they’re angry, scared, or in pain (or maybe they’re in a metal band!). Some might say that screaming is bad, but here’s why science says it’s good for you.

“For the first time in the history of psychology there is a way to access feelings, hidden away, in a safe way and thus to reduce human suffering. It is, in essence, the first science of psychotherapy.” — Dr. Arthur Janov

Primal Therapy

Dr. Arthur Janov invented Primal Therapy in the late 1960’s. It is a practice that allows the patient to face their repressed emotions from past trauma head on and let those emotions go. This treatment is intended to cure any mental illness the patient may have that surfaced from this past trauma. In most cases, Primal Therapy has lead Dr. Janov’s patients to scream towards the end of their session, though it was not part of the original procedure. During a group therapy session that was at a standstill, Dr. Janov says that one of his patients, a student he called Danny, told a story that inspired him to implement a technique that he never would have thought of on his own.

Advertising

How it Started

“During a lull in our group therapy session, he told us a story about a man named Ortiz who was currently doing an act on the London stage in which he paraded around in diapers drinking bottles of milk. Throughout his number, Ortiz is shouting, ‘Mommy! Daddy! Mommy! Daddy!’ at the top of his lungs. At the end of his act he vomits. Plastic bags are passed out, and the audience is requested to follow suit.”

It doesn’t end there, though. Dr. Janov said that his patient was quite fascinated with that story, and that alone moved him to suggest something even he believed to be a little elementary.

“I asked him to call out, ‘Mommy! Daddy!’ Danny refused, saying that he couldn’t see the sense in such a childish act, and frankly, neither could I. But I persisted, and finally, he gave in. As he began, he became noticeably upset. Suddenly he was writhing on the floor in agony. His breathing was rapid, spasmodic. ‘Mommy! Daddy!’ came out of his mouth almost involuntarily in loud screeches. He appeared to be in a coma or hypnotic state. The writhing gave way to small convulsions, and finally, he released a piercing, deathlike scream that rattled the walls of my office. The entire episode lasted only a few minutes, and neither Danny nor I had any idea what had happened. All he could say afterward was: ‘I made it! I don’t know what, but I can feel.’”

Delving deeper

Dr. Janov says he was baffled for months, but then he decided to experiment with another patient with the same method, which lead to a similar result as before. The patient started out calling “Mommy! Daddy!” then experienced convulsions, heavy breathing, and then eventually screamed. After the session, Dr. Janov says his patient was transformed and became “virtually another human being. He became alert… he seemed to understand himself.”

Although the initial intention of this particular practice wasn’t to get the patient to scream, more than once did his Primal Therapy sessions end with the patient screaming and feeling lighter, revived, and relieved of stresses that were holding them down in life.

Some Methods To Practice Screaming

If you want to try it out for yourself, keep reading!

Advertising

  • Step 1: Be Alone — Be alone. If you live in a place that you can’t be alone, it might be a good idea to talk to your family or roommates and explain to them what you’re about to do and make sure they’re okay with it. If you’re good to go, move on to step 2.
  • Step 2: Lie Down — Lie down on a yoga mat on your back and place a pillow underneath your head. If you don’t own a yoga mat, you can use a rug or even a soft blanket.
  • Step 3: Think — Think of things that have hurt you or made you angry. It can be anything from your childhood or even something that happened recently to make yourself cry, if you’re not already crying or upset. You could even scream “Mommy! Daddy!” just like Dr. Janov’s patients did to get yourself started.
  • Step 4: Scream — Don’t hold anything back; cry and scream as loud as you can. You can also pound your fists on the ground, or just lie there and scream at the top of your lungs.

After this, you should return your breathing to a normal and steady pace. You should feel lighter, like a weight has been lifted off of you. If not, you can also try these other methods.

Scream Sing

Scream singing” is referring to what a lot of lead singers in metal or screamo bands will do. I’ve tried it and although I wasn’t very good at it, it was fun and definitely relieved me of any stress I was feeling from before. It usually ends up sounding like a really loud grunt, but nonetheless, it’s considered screaming.

Advertising

  • Step 1 — Bear down and make a grunting sound.
  • Step 2 — Hiss like a snake and make sure to do this from your diaphragm (your stomach) for as long as you can.
  • Step 3 — Breathe and push your stomach out for more air when you are belting notes, kind of like you would if you were singing.
  • Step 4 — Try different ways to let out air to control how long the note will last, just make sure not to let out too much air.
  • Step 5 — Distort your voice by pushing air out from your throat, just be careful not to strain yourself.
  • Step 6 — Play around with the pitch of your screams and how wide your mouth is open – the wider your mouth is open, the higher the screams will sound. The narrower or rounder your mouth is (and most likely shaped like an “o”), the lower the screams will sound.
  • Step 7 — Start screaming to metal music. If you’re not a huge metal fan, it’s okay. You don’t have to use this method if you don’t want to.

If you want a more thorough walkthrough of how to scream sing, here’s a good video tutorial. If this method is too strenuous on your vocal chords, stop. Also, make sure to stay hydrated when scream singing and drink lots of water.

Scream into a pillow

Grab a pillow and scream into it. This method is probably the fastest and easiest way to practice screaming. Just make sure to come up for air.

Advertising

Always remember to make sure that you’re not going to disturb anyone while practicing any of these methods of screaming. And with that, happy screaming!

Featured photo credit: Sharon Mollerus via flickr.com

Read Next