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Secrets for Waterfront Living on a Budget

Secrets for Waterfront Living on a Budget

You wake up listening to the tide come in and out, sit on your porch to enjoy a warm beverage at the start of the day, and breathe in the fresh breeze as it blows through your windows all day long—it sounds like a dream, and for many it is. Until now.

It’s possible to enjoy waterfront living on a budget with a little planning and some secret (until now!) tips. If you dream of enjoying waterfront living some day, or already have your dream lake house and want to cut back on spending, you won’t want to miss these tips.

Remember: The Type of Waterfront Matters—A Lot

If you’re looking to buy waterfront property on the cheap, consider the kind of waterfront you look for. Living on a small lake or river will provide the same peace and water opportunities without the higher price tag.

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“In the last decade, the popularity of lakefront property has exploded as well. But it is still not as fashionable as oceanfront…yet. As a result, the appreciation potential of a lakefront home is greater, in the opinion of many investors, than that near the beach.” — Paul Moore, owner of Smith Mountain Homes

Choose Aquatic Sports Wisely

Water sports can be expensive. Whether you enjoy jet skiing or towing guests behind your motorboat, the costs of maintenance and fuel alone are enough to make the financially conscious weary.

Living on water doesn’t mean you have to be a boat owner, though. Pick a few inexpensive water sports to take up as hobby. A few to try:

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  • Fishing: You can find equipment on the cheap easily online.
  • Paddle boarding: While the upfront cost is expensive, there are minimal maintenance costs.
  • Row boating: You can often find inexpensive rowboats online. A small amount of maintenance is required, but it’s minimal compared to other options.

Consider Wear and Tear on Your Boats

While considering where you’ll enjoy your waterfront living matters in terms of home costs, it also makes a big difference in how much maintenance you’ll need to do on your boat. The saltwater causes a lot more wear and tear than freshwater from a lake or river.

“Saltwater is much more corrosive then freshwater; any boat that spends time in saltwater should be thoroughly rinsed with freshwater and should have its engine flushed. It should also be noted that boats used in saltwater have a shorter life expectancy than boats used in freshwater.” — DiscoverBoating.com.

Waterproof Everything

Living on the water means that you not only need to worry about rain showers, but a heavy dose of dew every morning that settles on all of your expensive outdoor furniture. To avoid damaging these pricey additions to your backyard, waterproof your furniture or buy a cover to protect everything. The upfront cost will pay off when you aren’t replacing tables and chairs every year.

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Avoid Touristy Areas

It goes without saying that housing price tags and the cost of living are higher in popular tourist destinations. Look for up-and-coming locations or remote areas that may be further from a town and therefore much less expensive.

Compare the Cost of Dock vs. Marina Mooring

Paying to dock your boat at a local marina gets expensive—fast. The average cost to dock a 35-foot boat at Harbor Island West Marina in San Diego is $577.50 per month, according to their website. Dock it for 12 months out of the year and you’re looking at a hefty annual fee.

Keeping your water vessels at your own dock will not only save you thousands of dollars, but it’s more convenient. Having immediate access to your boat(s) makes it easier to take quick or spur-of-the-moment trips onto the water for sunrise, sunset, or a quick lunch cruise.

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Make waterfront living a reality with these tips. Soon you’ll be sipping tea on your front porch while you watch the sun rise over the water, certain that you’ve hit the jackpot.

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

    Why You Need a Vision

    Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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    How to Create Your Life Vision

    Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

    What Do You Want?

    The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

    It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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    Some tips to guide you:

    • Remember to ask why you want certain things
    • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
    • Give yourself permission to dream.
    • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
    • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

    Some questions to start your exploration:

    • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
    • What would you like to have more of in your life?
    • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
    • What are your secret passions and dreams?
    • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
    • What do you want your relationships to be like?
    • What qualities would you like to develop?
    • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
    • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
    • What would you most like to accomplish?
    • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

    It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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    What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

    Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

    A few prompts to get you started:

    • What will you have accomplished already?
    • How will you feel about yourself?
    • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
    • What does your ideal day look like?
    • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
    • What would you be doing?
    • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
    • How are you dressed?
    • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
    • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
    • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

    It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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    Plan Backwards

    It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

    • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
    • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
    • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
    • What important actions would you have had to take?
    • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
    • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
    • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
    • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
    • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

    Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

    It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

    Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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