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10 Healthy Reasons You Should Be Eating Moringa Leaves

10 Healthy Reasons You Should Be Eating Moringa Leaves

It’s scientific name is Moringa oleifera, but this plant that is native to North India is also called Moringa, ben oil tree, radish tree, or drumstrick tree. This is a plant that has thousands of years’ worth of praise due to the many health benefits that it provides. Through the years, scientists have really only investigated a portion of the reported health benefits provided by this miracle plant.

Here are just ten reasons you should add Moringa leaves to your diet:

1. Moringa is rich in antioxidants

Antioxidants are the compounds that are responsible for ridding the body of free radicals. When free radicals are present in high numbers, this can lead to such chronic diseases as type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Moringa provides antioxidants like beta-carotene, Vitamin C, Chlorogenic acid, and Quercetin. One study found that just seven grams of Moringa leaf powder each day for 90 days can increase antioxidant levels in blood.

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2. Moringa improves overall gut health

Ulcers, gastritis, and gastric cancer are all byproducts of H. pylori—a bacteria that can be fought with the anti-bacterial properties of Moringa.

3. Moringa is loaded with nutrients

Moringa leaves can be consumed in a variety of ways, like through capsules, powder, or whole and raw. One cup of chopped fresh leaves provide a plethora of vitamins and minerals. In just this amount of leaves, you are served with two grams of protein, 19 percent of the recommended amount of Vitamin B6, 12 percent of your Vitamin C, 11 percent of your Iron, eight percent of your Magnesium, nine percent of your Vitamin A, and 11 percent of your B2 (Riboflavin). Individuals in developing countries tend to suffer from a lack of vitamins and minerals, and Moringa steps in to provide these essential nutrients.

4. Moringa may reduce inflammation

The body’s natural response to an injury or infection is inflammation. This is an essential protective mechanism, but when it goes on for long periods of time, it can lead to major health issues like heart disease, cancer, and other chronic illnesses. Thanks to the isothiocyanates, Moringa seeds, pods, and leaves provide these anti-inflammatory effects. Consume Moringa in tea or powder form—there is no harm in the delivery method.

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5. Moringa helps digestion

The high fiber content of Moringa works in a way that will basically clear out all of the extra stuff that is left over from a diet that is high in grease.

6. Moringa has the ability to lower blood sugar levels

High blood sugar levels is a gateway to not only diabetes, but other problems like heart disease, so prevention is key. Animal studies have shown that Moringa helps lower blood sugar levels. One study showed that 30 women reduced their blood sugar levels by 13.5 percent after consuming seven grams of powdered Moringa leaves each day for three months. This is all thanks to the compounds found in Moringa called isothiocyanates.

7. Moringa helps protect against arsenic toxicity

Many parts of the world deal with contamination of their food and water, rice particularly. Though symptoms of toxicity won’t be shown right away, long-term exposure will lead to health problems like cancer or heart disease. The leaves of Moringa have been shown to protect against arsenic toxicity in mice and rats, and it is believed to have the same effect on humans.

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8. Moringa can lower your cholesterol

High cholesterol has been linked to a higher risk of heart disease. Moringa has been shown to reduce cholesterol in a way that is similar to almonds, oats, and flax seeds.

9. Moringa protects against tumors and cancer

Thanks in part to a compound called niazimicin, studies have shown that Moringa leaves possess properties that can prevent tumor and cancer activity in the body.

10. Moringa can purify water

A protein that is found in the Moringa plant has the ability to bind with impurities found in water, which causes them to congeal so that these clusterings may be separated from the water. Just the sheer knowledge of this will revolutionize access to water that is safe to drink. If it has the ability to do this, imagine what it can do for your body.

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Featured photo credit: Books for Life via flickr.com

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Sasha Brown

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

    Why You Need a Vision

    Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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    How to Create Your Life Vision

    Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

    What Do You Want?

    The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

    It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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    Some tips to guide you:

    • Remember to ask why you want certain things
    • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
    • Give yourself permission to dream.
    • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
    • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

    Some questions to start your exploration:

    • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
    • What would you like to have more of in your life?
    • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
    • What are your secret passions and dreams?
    • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
    • What do you want your relationships to be like?
    • What qualities would you like to develop?
    • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
    • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
    • What would you most like to accomplish?
    • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

    It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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    What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

    Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

    A few prompts to get you started:

    • What will you have accomplished already?
    • How will you feel about yourself?
    • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
    • What does your ideal day look like?
    • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
    • What would you be doing?
    • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
    • How are you dressed?
    • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
    • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
    • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

    It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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    Plan Backwards

    It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

    • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
    • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
    • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
    • What important actions would you have had to take?
    • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
    • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
    • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
    • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
    • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

    Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

    It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

    Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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