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The Best Time To Eat Fruits To Maximize The Benefits

The Best Time To Eat Fruits To Maximize The Benefits

It’s no secret that eating fruit is good for you. That kind of knowledge has been crammed into our heads from a very early age. However, certain times are better than others for our body to break down fruit in the most efficient and useful way. Remember, your body needs 3-4 servings of fruit daily, which equates to about 2-2 1/2 cups of fruit per day.

You may be surprised to hear when you should eat fruit (I know I was). Read on to find out when you should eat your fruit for maximum benefits!

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Eating Fruit in the Morning is Best

Due to their high fructose content, it’s best to eat fruit in the morning after our body’s been shut down for the night and needs a quick boost. If you eat fruit too close to bedtime, the high sugar levels will keep you from getting a proper night of sleep. Fruit is easily digested and broken down into its nutrients by the body’s digestive system, so you should always eat it right before you need energy, like first thing in the morning or before lunch.

After eating fruit, wait 1-2 hours for your body to fully digest it before eating a meal. This will give you enough time so you don’t feel bloated or gassy, and your intestines are clear and ready for the next food source.

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Never Eat Fruit With a Meal

A little-known fact is that you should never eat fruit with anything but more fruit. While eating a fruit salad is alright, as long as you don’t have too many non-fruit ingredients; however, eating them with too much other food slows the digestive process of the normally quick-digesting fruit. This includes smoothies. While it’s okay to consume a smoothie with a piece of fruit or two, some nut milk or coconut milk, and maybe even some veggies, you should still avoid drinking the smoothie alongside a meal. Also, don’t use milk in your smoothies every time. Switch it up with water on occasion to get your digestive tract happy.

Why Eating Fruit at These Times Improves Your Health and Happiness

By eating fruit early on in the day, you’ll get a quick boost of energy and nourishment to get you through the day. Your increase in energy (and a decrease in hunger) will keep you happy and make it easier to make good decisions. This improvement in willpower will also help you stick to exercise goals, be friendlier towards your significant other or coworkers, and get more done.

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In addition to these amazing benefits, eating fruit also helps to promote weight loss! You could be well on your way to getting that bikini body you’ve always wanted. Fruits contain plenty of nutrients, fiber, and healthy carbs to keep your body looking and feeling good all day long.

Finally, different fruits offer different nutrients. Most of them offer vitamin C, but did you know avocados offer vitamins K, B5, B6, and E, as well as potassium, folate, and more? By mixing up your fruit intake, you open your body to absorbing the full range of healthy nutrients it needs. Bananas, in particular, have tons of potassium, and they can help lower your risk of high blood pressure and stroke! If you really want to try something different, papayas are delicious and contain papain, which has been shown to improve your digestion, as well as more folate.

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Conclusion

You now know the best times to eat fruits, and why you shouldn’t eat them with a big meal! If you keep these tips in mind, you’ll be well on your way to perfecting your diet and living a more enjoyable, healthy life.

Happy eating!

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Bill Widmer

Content Marketing Expert

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Last Updated on April 8, 2020

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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The leap happens when we realize two things:

  1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
  2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

“Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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