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Research Finds That Gap Year Is Beneficial For Long-Term

Research Finds That Gap Year Is Beneficial For Long-Term

What Is A Gap Year?

In college terms, a gap year is a length of time (usually a year) away from schooling after high school to find purpose, work, or even volunteer, instead of pursuing college immediately. Many students have even traveled for their gap year, allowing them to experience more of the world before being confined to the endless pages of school textbooks. More and more research is conducted relating to the idea behind the gap year to see how it is helping soon to be college bound students develop.

Based on the research found from the American Gap Association, a non-profit organization in charge of handling the data for gap year students, students who had pursued the gap year in 2012 and 2013 were more likely to graduate with a higher grade point average than traditional students. This research was done in both the United States and the United Kingdom. It also suggested that even students who were not very academic in high school would go on to be some of these students who held higher grade point averages upon completion of college. From 2012-2013, gap year students rose 27%.

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Now Gap Year Students Are Being Noticed

A handful of universities have taken notice to the recent increasing amount of students participating in gap years and offering a portion of their financial aid to help still be admitted into college after a year with schooling. Usually, a student would take the proper tests and be a part of the proper process to go accept a college’s offer as they leave high school, but a few colleges are more than willing to work with students who found their purpose through the beneficial gap year.

The University Of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is one of the colleges participating in helping gap year students. The school has developed the Global Gap Year Fellowship to grant $7,500 dollars for a student to develop their own beneficial way to spend their gap year instead of school.

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How Gap Years Help Students

Besides helping to relieve the burnout feeling that many students have upon exiting high school, a gap year also offers more than that for students. It offers an individual a year to hone in on what really interests them, instead of being shackled and restrained by lesson plans and lectures.

The American Gap Association validates that many students who take gap years do so to fix the issue of academic burnout and have a desire for increased self-awareness. Harvard University — one of the top universities in the nation — fully supports the idea of a gap year, concluding that there is a lot of pressure placed on students in the middle/high school fast track. Harvard’s academic admission officers are “concerned that the pressures on today’s students seem far more intense than those placed on previous generations.” Thus they make sure to note that Harvard has been advising for students to potentially have a gap year for 40 years, and that about 80 out of 110 students will defer college for another year. Students at Harvard in 2000 that took advantage of the gap year would advise every student to do it.

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Studies in both Finland and Australia have noted that students don’t perform any worse for taking a year off or going immediately to college. Not that they were outperforming each other, but it’s humble research like this that shows that students will do just fine in taking a year to find themselves before college.

Conclusion

It should not be taken lightly that universities around the nation are beginning to look at ways to make gap years affordable for their prospective students. From talking with students who have had the opportunity, they absolutely agree it was necessary to finding their own balance in school and achieving what they wanted. Even Malia Obama is deciding to take a year off of school before attending Harvard in 2017.

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Last Updated on May 16, 2019

The Daily Rituals of 7 Successful CEOs

The Daily Rituals of 7 Successful CEOs

One of my favorite success quotes ever comes from one of the original and most successful ‘CEOs’ of his era: Aristotle. Here’s what he said:

“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.”

This advice is just as sound today as it was when Aristotle first expressed it, way back when. I’m reminded of this at least once a week, when I interview an inspiring author, leader, or successful CEO on my show. I ask my guests a series of questions about what has contributed to their success and their ability to build something meaningful.

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You want to know what nearly all of them say? Almost every time, they respond by telling me that their success is the result of simple habits  enacted day after day.

These quotes from seven successful CEOs demonstrate the daily rituals that have contributed to their success:

1. Promote what you love.

“It’s so much better to promote what you love than to bash what you hate.” – Jessica Alba, CEO of The Honest Company

2. Develop a feedback loop.

“I think it’s very important to have a feedback loop, where you’re constantly thinking about what you’ve done and how you could be doing it better. I think that’s the single best piece of advice: constantly think about how you could be doing things better and questioning yourself.” – Elon Musk, CEO of TESLA Motors

3. Create things that are better, not just “different.”

“Our task today is to find singular ways to create the new things that will make the future not just different, but better—to go from 0 to 1. The essential first step is to think for yourself. Only by seeing our world anew, as fresh and strange as it was to the ancients who saw it first, can we both re-create it and preserve it for the future.” – Peter Thiel, CEO of Palantir and best-selling author of Zero To One.

4. Meditate.

“Meditate. Breathe consciously. Listen. Pay attention. Treasure every moment. Make the connection.” – Oprah Winfrey, CEO of OWN Network

5. Read every day.

“Read 500 pages every day. That’s how knowledge works. It builds up like compound interest.”-Warren Buffet, CEO of investment firm Berkshire-Hathaway

6. Block time for email.

“Set aside a 20- to 30-minute chunk of time two or three times a day for email. Do not check continually through the day.” – Doug Camplejohn, CEO of predictive lead marketing company FlipTop.

7. Make your customers happy.

“We see our customers as invited guests to a party, and we are the hosts. It’s our job every day to make every important aspect of the customer experience a little bit better.” – Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon.com

Develop the right rituals. Become a successful CEO.

If the majority of these daily habits are new to you, avoid making the crucial mistake of adopting all of these habits at once. Research on habit-formation indicates that lasting habits are formed one at a time.

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For example, let’s say you’re excited about developing the following daily habits:

  • daily reading,
  • daily meditation, and
  • updating your to-do list every night

Let’s say that daily reading is the one that excites you the most out of the three habits noted above. It would be wise of you to begin by choosing and scheduling time to read every day, and then sticking to that time until it becomes a habit. Once it feels effortless and automatic, you’ll know that you’ve turned it into a daily habit. Now you’re ready to install the next habit… and the next… Until before you know it, you’ll start looking in the mirror and seeing the reflection of a successful CEO.

Featured photo credit: Amy Hirschi via unsplash.com

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