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6 Perfect Jobs For Online College Students

6 Perfect Jobs For Online College Students

As many college students know, taking online classes offers a unique set of challenges and opportunities. A lack of face to face contact with peers and instructors can be difficult to adjust to for some, but opens a door of flexibility for others.

As someone who has taken an array of online classes at the high school and university levels, I certainly understand that working while at school is immensely helpful.

These six jobs work well with a flexible online schooling schedule. It’s possible to actually feel like you’re in charge of your scheduling while working and attending school, and these jobs are a gateway to this type of unique freedom.

Nanny or Caregiver

Oftentimes, being a nanny can offer some really flexible work schedules. I have friends who have gone to school online while working as a nanny. They were able to complete their homework at work, while their clients kids took naps.

While I’ve never worked as a nanny specifically, I have worked as a caregiver while I was attending college. My client was a 90-year old man, who often took naps himself, and I remember getting a lot of homework done from my laptop during those times.

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Nothing is better for a college student then being able to double up; completing school work while getting paid to work at your regular job.

Driver

Forget the old-school taxi driver job! Working for a contemporary ride services like Uber is a great way for college students to get extra money. All you need is a solid, newer car, and a decent driving record.

The best part about being an Uber or Lyft driver, is that you work only when you want to. And these companies can even assist you in financing a new car!

Freelance Writer

While my own freelance career took off after attending college, I can certainly see how this line of work would be ideal for those still attending school. If you really enjoy writing and blogging, getting started is probably much easier than you’d expect.

Start by finding blogs that you are personally interested in writing for, start by asking yourself, “what are my genuine areas of interest?” Develop a writing resume and then reach out to website that pay per article.

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This is exactly how I started as a freelance writer, and I couldn’t be happier with my career choice. The following two resources were great resources for finding sites that actually pay per piece:

Make A Living Writing: Websites That Pay Writers 2015: These 79 Sites Offer $50 and Up

The Write Life: 9 Online Gold Mines for Finding Paid Freelance Writing Jobs

Writers in Charge: 45+ Authentic Websites that Will Pay You to Write

Starbucks Barista

You may be wondering, “why is Starbucks on this list? Barista work seems like an outlier.”

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But in fact, it isn’t at all.

As an ex-Starbucks barista, I can say that the corporate giant actually has some great incentives for employees attending college, such as awesome insurance benefits, weekly tips, and even tuition reimbursement for Arizona State University students! What’s better than your job paying for your college tuition?

Music Instructor

If you are musically inclined and have any experience teaching, working as a music instructor can be a job that is rewarding both personally and for your wallet!

Teaching beginning guitar or piano lessons can usually earn about $50/hour. Many students want half hour lessons starting out and that’s okay! The key is to build up a repertoire of clients seeking music instruction, and go from there.

Free websites such as Craigslist’s lessons & tutoring section are great ways to start building up clients. Good old fashioned flyering at relevant locations also works well!

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Web Store Owner

Sites like Etsy and Big Cartel allows anyone to create a web store, with little internet overhead. Do you enjoy screen-printing and have an idea for a t-shirt design that you are confident people would buy? Maybe you love making beautiful crafty accessories such as buttons, lapel pins, or other earrings?

Online storefronts are a great option for this type of work. And best of all, you can run the business from the comfort of your home. Your only limit is your own creativity!

Featured photo credit: Gratisography via gratisography.com

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Robert Parmer

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Last Updated on March 30, 2020

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

Traditionally, when you have a lot of ideas in your mind, you would create a text document, or take a sheet of paper and start writing in a linear fashion like this:

  • Intro to Visual Facilitation
    • Problem, Consequences, Solution, Benefits, Examples, Call to action
  • Structure
    • Why, What, How to, What If
  • Do It Myself?
    • Audio, Images, time-consuming, less expensive
  • Specialize Offering?
    • Built to Sell (Standard Product Offering), Options (Solving problems, Online calls, Dev projects)

This type of document quickly becomes overwhelming. It obviously lacks in clarity. It also makes it hard for you to get a full picture at a glance and see what is missing.

You always have too much information to look at, and most often you only get a partial view of the information. It’s hard to zoom out, figuratively, and to see the whole hierarchy and how everything is connected.

To see a fuller picture, create a mind map.

What Is a Mind Map?

A mind map is a simple hierarchical radial diagram. In other words, you organize your thoughts around a central idea. This technique is especially useful whenever you need to “dump your brain”, or develop an idea, a project (for example, a new product or service), a problem, a solution, etc. By capturing what you have in your head, you make space for other thoughts.

In this article, we are focusing on the basics: mind mapping using pen and paper.

The objective of a mind map is to clearly visualize all your thoughts and ideas before your eyes. Don’t complicate a mind map with too many colors or distractions. Use different colors only when they serve a purpose. Always keep a mind map simple and easy to follow.

    Image Credit: English Central

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    By following the three next steps below, you will be able to create such mind maps easily and quickly.

    3 Simple Steps to Create a Mind Map

    The three steps are:

    1. Set a central topic
    2. Add branches of related ideas
    3. Add sub-branches for more relevant ideas

    Let’s take a look at an example Verbal To Visual illustrates on the benefits of mind mapping.[1]

    Step 1 : Set a Central Topic

    Take a blank sheet of paper, write down the topic you’ve been thinking about: a problem, a decision to make, an idea to develop, or a project to clarify.

    Word it in a clear and concise manner.

      What is the first idea that comes to mind when you think of the subject for your mind map? Draw a line (straight or curved) from the central topic, and write down that idea.

        Step 3 : Add Sub-Branches for More Relevant Ideas

        Then, what does that idea make you think of? What is related to it? List it out next to it in the same way, using your pen.

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          You can always add more to it later, but that’s good for now.

          In our example, we could detail the sub-branch “Benefits” by listing those benefits in sub-branches of the branch “Benefits”. Unfortunately, we already reached the side of the sheet, so we’re out of space to do so. You could always draw a line to a white space on the page and list them there, but it’s awkward.

          Since we created this mind map on a regular letter-format sheet of paper, the quantity of information that fits in there is very limited. That is one of the main reasons why I recommend that you use software rather than pen and paper for most of the mind mapping that you do.

          Repeat Step 2 and Step 3

          Repeat steps 2 and 3 as many times as you need to flush out all of your ideas around the topic that you chose.

            I added first-level (main) branches around the central topic mostly in a clockwise fashion, from top-right to top-left. That is how, by convention, a mind map is read.

            In the next section, we are covering the three strategies to building your maps.  

            Mind Map Examples to Illustrate Mind Mapping

            You can go about creating a mind map in various ways:

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            • Branch by Branch: Adding whole branches (with all of their sub-branches), one by one.
            • Level by Level: Adding elements to the map, one level at a time. That means that firstly, you add elements around the central topic (main branches). Then, you add sub-branches to those main branches. And so on.
            • Free-Flow: Adding elements to your mind map as they come to you, in no particular order.

            Branch by Branch

            Start with the central topic, add a first branch. Focus on that branch and detail it as much as you can by adding all the sub-branches that you can think of.

              Then develop ideas branch by branch.

                A branch after another, and the mind map is complete.

                  Level by Level

                  In this “Level by Level” strategy, you first add all the elements that you can think of around the central topic, one level deep only. So here you add elements on level 1:

                    Then, go over each branch and add the immediate sub-branches (one level only). This is level 2:

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                      Idem for the next level. This is level 3. You can have as many levels as you want in a mind map. In our example, we only have 3 levels. Now the map is complete:

                        Free-Flow

                        Basically, a free flow strategy of mind mapping is to add main branches and sub-topics freely. No rules to restrict how ideas should flow in the mind map. The only thing to pay attention to is that you need to be careful about the level of the ideas you’re adding to the mind map — is it a main topic, or is it a subtopic?

                          I recommend using a combination of the “Branch by Branch” and the “Free-Flow” strategies.

                          What I normally do is I add one branch at a time, and later on review the mind map and add elements in various places to finish it. I also sometimes build level 1 (the main branches) first, then use a “Branch by Branch” approach, and later finish the map in a “Free-Flow” manner.

                          Try each strategy and combinations of strategies, and see what works best for you.

                          The Bottom Line

                          When you’re feeling stuck or when you’re just starting to think about a particular idea or project, take out a paper and start to brain dump your ideas and create a mind map. Mind mapping has the magic to clear your head and have your thoughts organized.

                          If you can’t always have access to a paper and pen, don’t worry! Creating a mind map with software is very effective and you get none of the drawbacks of pen and paper. You can also apply the above steps and strategies just the same when using a mind mapping tool on the phone and computer.

                          More Tools to Help You Organize Thoughts

                          Featured photo credit: Alvaro Reyes via unsplash.com

                          Reference

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