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Trying To Make Some Extra Cash? 11 High-Paying Jobs You Should Consider

Trying To Make Some Extra Cash? 11 High-Paying Jobs You Should Consider

So, you finally landed your dream job but living your dream isn’t paying your electricity bill. Or perhaps you have an excessive shopping habit and your regular salary simply can’t keep up. Whatever your situation, your day job isn’t providing you with the financial satisfaction you were hoping for, and now you want to find some extra work to bring in some extra cash. There’s no shame in having a job on the side.

Fortunately, there are dozens of easy jobs that can generate a surprising amount of income — as long as you commit to them. Here are 11 of those high-paying jobs.

1. Copyeditor

Writing is an invaluable skill and it is slowly but surely dying, even in the information age. Thus, companies will pay big bucks (or about $17 per hour) to those who are equipped with impeccable grammar for writing and editing various types of copy, from social media posts to editorial content.

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2. Accountant

If you are a whiz with bookkeeping, there are a number of companies that desperately need your help. Part-time accountants come into an office and reconcile disparities between money in and money out. For this nail-bitingly necessary work, you can expect to take home roughly $19 per hour.

3. Photographer

Being a photographer is much more than taking pictures — it requires a detailed knowledge of lighting, composition, and editing to create magnificent images of people, places, and things. Professional photographers — meaning those who take pictures as their primary career — charge as much as $100 per hour. As a part-time photographer, you might start out charging around $20 per hour and work your way up. Of course, you will need to invest in some serious equipment first.

4. Translator

Although English is spoken far and wide, there remain a number of professions that require regular interaction with non-English speakers that need translation help. For example, legal assistants with foreign language experience can earn about $21 per hour by helping review legal documents and conversing with clients.

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5. Tutor

Knowledge is power — the power to make money. Tutoring students, be they children in grade school or adults at college, is incredibly profitable, but the amount you charge is dependent on your experience and availability. Some tutors can charge more than $30 per hour, but most take home about $20 per hour.

6. Driver

Now that Uber and similar apps have made the driving profession easier to navigate, almost anyone can make money driving their own cars. In big cities, Uber claims drivers can take home $90,000 a year. However, that’s without the costs of gasoline, maintenance, and insurance. More realistically, you can expect to earn about $20 per hour driving.

7. Social Media Manager

Modern businesses live and die by their social media campaigns, which makes correctly managing social accounts incredibly lucrative. Social media gurus can earn up to $25 per hour by updating companies’ websites, overseeing their social media, and drafting reports on efficacy.

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8. Investment Trader

The stock market is a veritable treasure trove for side hustlers. Though trading on the market is inarguably risky, traders with knowledge and skill can certainly make big bucks. What you take out of the market is wholly dependent on what you put in and how you trade, but you should be cautious while learning the ropes.

9. Software Developer

It likely isn’t necessary to explain how in demand software developers are in a world where online apps sell for billions of dollars. Payment for software developers is usually on a per-project basis, but experienced workers can earn around $30 per hour. Of course, this is a highly skilled trade — you must know how to create new websites and apps, update old ones, build templates, and more.

10. Travel Blogger

If travel is at the top of your bucket list, you can prep for your future trips as a travel blogger. Tourism and real estate companies contract writers to develop content about certain places (including information on population size, things to do, climate, and more) to entice visitors. For this opportunity, you could earn between $50 and $100 per project.

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11. Nanny/Au Pair

You might remember taking home bank when you babysat your neighbor’s toddlers. As an adult, you can still make money watching other people’s kids by becoming a nanny or au pair. Part-time nannies can earn about $20 per hour, while live-in au pairs make weekly salaries that range from $100 to $300 or more.

Featured photo credit: Picjumbo via picjumbo.com

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Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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