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5 Things to Consider When Moving to New York

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5 Things to Consider When Moving to New York

So You’re Moving to New York…

You’re probably excited. You’re probably terrified. You probably hope you don’t run away in a few years. Here are a few questions you may be asking yourself, and the best answers  to make your move as seamless as possible.

1. Manhattan or Brooklyn?

Though Manhattan or Brooklyn used to be the question, the choice is more likely between Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, Staten Island, New Jersey, Westchester or Connecticut now. Though if you’re moving to New York, you probably want to be in one of the five boroughs.

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Manhattan is obviously one of the most coveted boroughs. It has everything, from restaurants to shopping to nightclubs. This is the center of the hustle and bustle in the city. Brooklyn is considered the second-most coveted. Some even refer to Brooklyn as, “The new Manhattan.” Brooklyn tends to have a laid-back West Coast hipster vibe. More people actually migrate from Manhattan to Brooklyn to go out on a Friday night now than the other way around.

Queens has an industrial vibe yet is its own beast as the largest borough spatially. The Bronx is still a little rough, yet it has plenty of culture; the Bronx Zoo, the Bronx Botanical Gardens and the Grand Concourse are all touristy areas. Staten Island is very suburban and feels more like New Jersey than New York.

2. Broker or No Broker?

Most New Yorkers hire brokers to find their apartments, condos and co-ops. When most outsiders move to New York, they swear they don’t need a broker. Yet they often crack. It’s not a bad idea to find a broker before heading to the Big Apple. Even if you want to try to “go it alone” for a bit, you might want a broker in the long run. The New York City real estate system is set up to favor brokers. It doesn’t cost anything to talk to a broker and start looking at apartments, so try to keep an open mind.

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3. Apartment, Condo or Co-op?

In New York City, you can rent or own. Apartments are rented and condos are purchased (though many New Yorkers refer to condos as apartments).

Co-ops are in between renting and buying. Most New Yorkers deal with high homeowners’ association (HOA) fees, though. Make sure you ask about HOA fees prior to looking at an apartment. You might also need to ask around about other fees too. If you own an apartment, your HOA fees go to preserve common areas – not your apartment. You’ll still need to pay for those costs on your own.

4. What’s Up with Your Neighborhood?

New York City neighborhoods are ever-changing. They are practically living things. The neighborhood you move into won’t be the same hood in three-to-five years. New York is a transient culture. Nearly 8.5 million people live in the city right now. That number rises every year. This is kind of shocking when you think about how many people move to and from New York each year. Neighborhoods can change fast – which can be good and bad. Tons of factors can change a neighborhood’s flavor.

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One of the major changes is gentrification, which is the changing of the social and economic climate of an area. Even though gentrification will probably change your neighborhood for the better, it will probably change your neighborhood in ways you do not enjoy too. Your favorite restaurant will close in a year and become a Duane Reade. The only family on the block who has lived here for more than two years will move away.

5. Where are the Subways?

It’s hard for people who are moving New York from “driving cities” to adapt to the walking and subway lifestyle. Plenty of people bring their cars with them. Most people ditch the cars after a few months. It’s extremely expensive to own a car in New York City. It’s equally expensive – and just as annoying – to take cabs everywhere.

Everyone uses the subway. Even wealthy residents and celebrities. It’s just more convenient than a car. Make sure your new apartment is close to the subway – within a few blocks.

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Featured photo credit: Aurelien Guichard/New York City via flic.kr

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Bethany Cleg

Photographer, Entrepreneur

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Last Updated on December 2, 2021

The Importance of Making a Camping Checklist

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The Importance of Making a Camping Checklist

Camping can be hard work, but it’s the preparation that’s even harder. There are usually a lot of things to do in order to make sure that you and your family or friends have the perfect camping experience. But sometimes you might get to your destination and discover that you have left out one or more crucial things.

There is no dispute that preparation and organization for a camping trip can be quite overwhelming, but if it is done right, you would see at the end of the day, that it was worth the stress. This is why it is important to ensure optimum planning and execution. For this to be possible, it is advised that in addition to a to-do-list, you should have a camping checklist to remind you of every important detail.

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Why You Should Have a Camping Checklist

Creating a camping checklist makes for a happy and always ready camper. It also prevents mishaps.  A proper camping checklist should include every essential thing you would need for your camping activities, organized into various categories such as shelter, clothing, kitchen, food, personal items, first aid kit, informational items, etc. These categories should be organized by importance. However, it is important that you should not list more than you can handle or more than is necessary for your outdoor adventure.

Camping checklists vary depending on the kind of camping and outdoor activities involved. You should not go on the internet and compile a list of just any camping checklist. Of course, you can research camping checklists, but you have to put into consideration the kind of camping you are doing. It could be backpacking, camping with kids, canoe camping, social camping, etc. You have to be specific and take note of those things that are specifically important to your trip, and those things which are generally needed in all camping trips no matter the kind of camping being embarked on.

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Here are some tips to help you prepare for your next camping trip.

  1. First off, you must have found the perfect campground that best suits your outdoor adventure. If you haven’t, then you should. Sites like Reserve America can help you find and reserve a campsite.
  2. Find or create a good camping checklist that would best suit your kind of camping adventure.
  3. Make sure the whole family is involved in making out the camping check list or downloading a proper checklist that reflects the families need and ticking off the boxes of already accomplished tasks.
  4. You should make out or download a proper checklist months ahead of your trip to make room for adjustments and to avoid too much excitement and the addition of unnecessary things.
  5. Checkout Camping Hacks that would make for a more fun camping experience and prepare you for different situations.

Now on to the checklist!

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Here is how your checklist should look

1. CAMPSITE GEAR

  • Tent, poles, stakes
  • Tent footprint (ground cover for under your tent)
  • Extra tarp or canopy
  • Sleeping bag for each camper
  • Sleeping pad for each camper
  • Repair kit for pads, mattress, tent, tarp
  • Pillows
  • Extra blankets
  • Chairs
  • Headlamps or flashlights ( with extra batteries)
  • Lantern
  • Lantern fuel or batteries

2.  KITCHEN

  • Stove
  • Fuel for stove
  • Matches or lighter
  • Pot
  • French press or portable coffee maker
  • Corkscrew
  • Roasting sticks for marshmallows, hot dogs
  • Food-storage containers
  • Trash bags
  • Cooler
  • Ice
  • Water bottles
  • Plates, bowls, forks, spoons, knives
  • Cups, mugs
  • Paring knife, spatula, cooking spoon
  • Cutting board
  • Foil
  • soap
  • Sponge, dishcloth, dishtowel
  • Paper towels
  • Extra bin for washing dishes

3. CLOTHES

  • Clothes for daytime
  • Sleepwear
  • Swimsuits
  • Rainwear
  • Shoes: hiking/walking shoes, easy-on shoes, water shoes
  • Extra layers for warmth
  • Gloves
  • Hats

4. PERSONAL ITEMS

  • Sunscreen
  • Insect repellent
  • First-aid kit
  • Prescription medications
  • Toothbrush, toiletries
  • Soap

5. OTHER ITEMS

  • Camera
  • Campsite reservation confirmation, phone number
  • Maps, area information

This list is not completely exhaustive. To make things easier, you can check specialized camping sites like RealSimpleRainyAdventures, and LoveTheOutdoors that have downloadable camping checklists that you can download on your phone or gadget and check as you go.

Featured photo credit: Scott Goodwill via unsplash.com

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