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7 Changes You’ll Undergo When You Stop Eating Meat

7 Changes You’ll Undergo When You Stop Eating Meat

It is always said that going vegetarian will make you lack important nutrients. While the American Dietetic Association clarified that “appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases”. A study done in 2013 also proved that vegetarians live longer than non-vegetarians by almost 20%. Below are the specific great changes you’ll undergo when you stop eating meat.

1. Your Skin Will Start to Glow

The benefits of going meat-free can be external too. According to holistic nutritionist Susan Tucker MD, the founder of Green Beat Life, the higher amounts of minerals, antioxidants, and fiber included in plant-based diets help detoxify and lead to clearer skin. Plant-based diets can lead to the clearing of common skin problems like eczema and acne.

2. Your Body Will Be Less Acidic

Tucker explains that processed foods, and animal products, like milk and cheese, lead to an acidic environment in the body. Over-acidification causes commonly felt symptoms like nausea, fatigue, headaches, and fogginess. Plant-based diets are more alkaline, counteracting over-acidification and its unwanted symptoms. Consuming a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, legumes, and sprouted grains can help boost energy and clarity.

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3. You’ll Start Consuming the Right Types of Protein

A common misconception of transitioning from a meat-based diet to a plant-based one is that your body won’t receive the protein it needs to function properly. McMacken explains that the average meat and vegetable eater consumes more than 1.5-times the amount of protein it should from animal sources. Excess protein is then stored as fat and can result in weight gain and more serious issues like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

The protein you consume from a plant-based diet actually helps prevent a number of chronic diseases. According to Janice Stranger PhD, author of The Perfect Formula Diet, the longest-living people on earth receive 9-10% of their total calories from protein. The average American now receives roughly 15- 20% of their total calories from protein.

4. Your Cholesterol Levels Will Decrease

Like inflammation, high blood cholesterol levels can lead to stroke and heart disease. Animal products, like meats and cheeses, are high in the saturated fats that cause high cholesterol and ultimately harmful heart conditions.

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According to McMacken, studies consistently show that those who switch to a plant-based diet undergo a blood cholesterol drop of up to 35 percent. Plant-based diets are low in saturated fat and high in fiber — two characteristics that lead to dropping blood cholesterol levels.

5. You’ll Probably Lose Weight

There are a number of ways to lose weight when choosing a plant-based diet. Many lose weight when they first make the switch due to finding their protein in lower-calorie food sources, like tofu and other vegetarian-friendly products.

A recent study published by the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics showed that participants prescribed a vegetarian diet experienced an average weight loss of 7.5 pounds. Meals high in fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains can lead to even more rapid weight loss.

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6. You’ll Reduce Your Risk of Common Diseases

One of the biggest perks of making the change to a plant-based diet is that you’ll reduce inflammation in your body, and ultimately, reduce your risk of many serious diseases. According to board-certified internal medicine physician Michele McMacken MD, those who eat diets full of meats and highly processed foods experience elevated levels of inflammation. Chronic inflammation can lead to autoimmune diseases, diabetes, strokes, heart attacks, and a number of other serious conditions.

Naturally anti-inflammatory plant-based diets are full of phytonutrients, like antioxidants and fiber. They typically include fewer dietary elements that lead to chronic inflammation, like saturated fats and toxins.

7. You’ll Feel Better About Your Impact on the Environment

Choosing a plant-based diet has as much of a positive impact on the environment and wildlife as it does on you. According to a 2014 article published in Pacific Standard, animal agriculture is the largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. The animal agriculture industry causes more greenhouse gas emissions than can be linked to all forms of transportation.

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The industry uses an irreplaceable amount of the earth’s forests, water, and wildlife habitats. Choosing to go plant-based means you’re taking a stand against the destruction of earth’s resources and its inhabitants.

Tips for Achieving Your Goal

Stopping your meat consumption “cold turkey” may not be easy. However, the Vegetarian Society offers some helpful tips for first-timers making the transition to a plant-based diet.

  1. Don’t feel like you have to make every change at once. If you’re having trouble cutting out meat entirely, start by reducing your meat consumption one meal at a time.
  2. Ask your doctor or a nutritionist for help. It can be difficult to know exactly how to stay healthy and energized on a plant-based diet at first. A qualified doctor or nutritionist can help you determine the difference between healthy choices and not-so-healthy ones.
  3. Go easy on yourself. It’s not easy for anyone to switch their diet in a day, so don’t be discouraged if you’re struggling to make the change. Go easy on yourself, give it another try if you have a “cheat day,” and refer back to the benefits of going plant-based for inspiration.

(https://www.vegsoc.org/goveggiehelp#)

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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