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All You Need To Know About A Contraction Stress Test

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All You Need To Know About A Contraction Stress Test

If you are pregnant you may be considering having a contraction stress test. If so, you may be asking yourself questions such as what the procedure is like and how it feels? Well, we have you covered. Continue to read on for the answers.

What Is A Contraction Stress Test?

One of the most important points to remember about the test is that it is conducted to simulate labor and the contractions you have where the oxygen levels will decrease for your baby. This is the only way to test whether or not the unborn baby will be able to deal with the stress of “proper” labor, when contractions will be coming on a regular basis. You’re probably dreading this part the most, but bear in mind the end results – your baby in your arms.

If you are 34 or more weeks pregnant, it may have been suggested that you have a contraction stress test. The test monitors the heartbeat of your unborn baby externally.

fetal heart monitor
    image source: Healthwise, Incorporated

    During contractions, the oxygen and blood supply that is going to your unborn baby drops. However, in most circumstances there is generally no cause to be alarmed. For the majority of babies, this isn’t going to be an issue. On the other hand in, a small portion of babies, the rate of the heartbeat can slow down. This is where it is picked up by the monitor as it can become an issue in labor.

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    The test may last for as little as 10 minutes, but this may depend on your doctor and individual circumstances.

    How to Prepare

    Before you are due to take the contraction stress test you will be asked to prepare for it.

    Here is what you should do:

    • Avoid eating and drinking for between 4 to 8 hours.
    • If you are a smoker, you will be asked not to have a cigarette at least 2 hours before you are due to have the test.
    • You will have to sign a consent form stating that you know the risks of having the test done and you agree to those risks.

    What Is the Procedure Like?

    The procedure can be a bit of a worry to most women. However, it really shouldn’t be since the test is pain free and it is for the benefit of your baby.

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    Throughout the test you will be asked to lie down with your back raised up and tilted slightly to the left. This may be a bit uncomfortable, but you will just have to try and grin and bear it. Plus, it won’t last long.

    An injection of the hormone Oxytocin will be given and you will have contractions. Strange, as it seems you may also be asked to massage one of your nipples since this will also start off the contractions.

    Two belts will then be placed around your belly, with one of them holding down the sensor to record the heartbeat of your unborn baby, while the second measures contractions. The sensors are plugged into the recording unit, monitoring the heartbeat of the baby for about 10 minutes.

    heart monitoring
      image source: medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary

      Why You May Need a Contraction Stress Test

      Not everyone may be offered a contraction stress test. It is only conducted after 34 weeks of pregnancy. You may be offered the test if any of the following applies:

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      • If you have had a non-stress test that appears abnormal.
      • You have had a biophysical profile that was abnormal.
      • You may also be advised to have more than one test throughout the duration of your pregnancy, depending on your circumstances.

      What Do The Results Mean?

      Once you have gone through the discomfort of the test, what do the results of the test mean?

      If the test is normal then it will be classed as being negative. This means that the heart rate of your unborn baby didn’t slow down or remained slowed after the contraction. This is a good thing, of course.

      If the test should be abnormal it is classed as a positive result. This means that the heartbeat of the baby slowed down and generally remained slow after the contraction stopped. Generally, this will occur on over half of the contractions you have when being monitored.

      If the heartbeat remains slow after the contractions it may result in the unborn baby suffering issues in normal labor.

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      What Might Affect The Test Results?

      As with any medical tests you have there are certain factors that might have an effect on the results of the test, or in some cases may mean you cannot have the test, these generally include:

      • Any issues in past pregnancies, including caesarean section where the cut was vertical.
      • Placenta Previa or placenta abruption.
      • If you are having twins or triplets.
      • If you have an incompetent cervix.
      • There is a risk of premature rupture of your membranes.
      • You have undergone uterine surgery.
      • If you are a heavy smoker or have used cocaine.
      • If you are classed as being overweight.

      Are There Any Risks?

      Before undergoing the contraction stress test your physician will explain any risks involved. You should also be aware that monitoring the baby’s heartbeat cannot detect all problems.

      There are some risks in taking Oxytocin. They are:

      • It may bring on early labor and premature birth of the baby.
      • The contractions may become prolonged and may cause problems for your baby.
      • In the extreme event of the contractions not stopping when they stop the Oxytocin, the doctor may recommend that the baby is delivered.

      Featured photo credit: Flikr via flickr.com

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      Last Updated on January 5, 2022

      How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

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      How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

      Children are most likely to say that they want to just lounge around or rest for a while after spending hours listening to lecture after lecture from their teachers. There is nothing wrong with this if they had a rough day.

      What’s disturbing, is if they deliberately stay away from schoolwork or procrastinate when it comes to reviewing for their tests or completing an important science project.

      When it seems that it is becoming a habit for your child to put off school work, it’s time for you to step in and help your child develop good study habits to get better grades. It is important for you to emphasize to your child the importance of setting priorities early in life. Don’t wait for them to flunk their tests, or worse, fail in their subjects before you talk to them about it.

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      You can help your children hurdle their tests with these 7 tips:

      1. Help them set targets

      Ask your child what they want to achieve for that particular school year. Tell them to set a specific goal or target. If they say, “I want to get better grades,” tell them to be more specific. It will be better if they say they want to get a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Having a definite target will make it easier for them to undertake a series of actions to achieve their goals, instead of just “shooting for the moon.”

      2. Preparation is key

      At the start of the school year, teachers provide an outline of a subject’s scope along with a reading list and other course requirements. Make sure that your child has all the materials they need for these course requirements. Having these materials on hand will make sure that your child will have no reason to procrastinate and give them the opportunity to study in advance.

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      3. Teach them to mark important dates

      You may opt to give them a small notebook where they can jot down important dates or a planner that has dates where they can list their schedule. Ask them to show this to you so you can give them “gentle reminders” to block off the whole week before the dates of an exam. During this week, advise your child to not schedule any social activity so they can concentrate on studying.

      4. Schedule regular study time

      Encourage your child to set aside at least two hours every day to go through their lessons. This will help them remember the lectures for the day and understand the concepts they were taught. They should be encouraged to spend more time on subjects or concepts that they do not understand.

      5. Get help

      Some kids find it hard to digest or absorb mathematical or scientific concepts. Ask your child if they are having difficulties with their subjects and if they would like to seek the help of a tutor. There is nothing wrong in asking for the assistance of a tutor who can explain complex subjects.

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      6. Schedule some “downtime”

      Your child needs to relax from time to time. During his break, you can consider bringing your child to the nearest mall or grocery store and get them a treat. You may play board games with them during their downtime. The idea is to take his mind off studying for a limited period of time.

      7. Reward your child

      If your child achieves their goals for the school year, you may give them a reward such as buying them the gadget they have always wanted or allowing them to vacation wherever they want. By doing this, you are telling your child that hard work does pay off.

      Conclusion

      You need to take the time to monitor your child’s performance in school. Your guidance is essential to helping your child realize the need to prioritize their school activities. As a parent, your ultimate goal is to expose your child to habits that will lay down the groundwork for their future success.

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      Featured photo credit: Annie Spratt via unsplash.com

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