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5 Ways Volunteering Benefits You

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5 Ways Volunteering Benefits You

According to a recent study released by the US Bureau of Labor and Statistics, volunteering in the United States has recently hit a ten-year low. In spite of the general decline, this still means that 62.6 million people spent time volunteering in the last year. While some people may not see the benefit of volunteering, I certainly believe that volunteering can change the outcomes for not just the population being served, but for the volunteer as well. For that reason, I have compiled a list of five ways in which the volunteer benefits from volunteering.

1. Volunteering connects you to other people and to your community.

Whether it is serving meals at a local soup kitchen or reading stories to underprivileged youth, volunteering helps you feel a larger sense of community and the world around you. Instead of staying in your lane with work, socializing, and your own family, you can gain a sense of the lives of those in your community are like via volunteering.

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2. Volunteering gives you a perspective unavailable elsewhere.

While I tend to think of volunteering and non-profit work as a very serious business, the fact of the matter is that people do it because of the emotional appeal. And, by appealing to their own emotions, volunteers are able to open up and learn about life in a way that was previously closed. For example, if you are down on yourself because you cannot quite land the job you want, volunteering at a homeless shelter might make you realize that the job is not everything, nor is it even really all that significant. In fact, volunteering will show that what is valuable is regular old kindness and appreciation.

3. Volunteering looks great on a resume.

Now that I’ve mentioned careers and landing the right job, I must point out that volunteerism really can help you land the job you want. If you volunteer long enough on a repeat basis at an organization you care about, that will show up on resume as dedication to a cause that is above yourself. Think about it: an potential employer spends a ton of their time leafing through resumes that show only how potential employers closed XX account or created YY widget. But how many employers would be impressed by consistent dedication to solving major social ills? Many, is my guess.

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4. Volunteering actually improves your health.

According to a Carnegie Mellon University study, volunteering may not only help your mind, but it may also actually benefit your body. This is especially true for volunteers over age 50. The study in question showed that, of those over aged 50, people who volunteered consistently had lower blood pressure than those who did not. And specific types of volunteering have specific help benefits as well. For example, in older adults, tutoring children helps memory and cognitive function, and activities that require a lot of movement (think of the soup kitchen again) help cardiovascular issue such as blood pressure.

5. Volunteering helps you develop new skills.

Maybe you ended up as an investment banker when you really had a knack for teaching. Or maybe you are a nurse who really has a knack for building houses. Whatever the case may be, volunteering can help you find skills you did not know you have. The only way to find out whether or not you are good at something is to do it consistently, and, if your career path at the moment does not include the area in which you think you need to grow, consider volunteering in that area. It could do a lot of good.

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For those who have been persuaded to volunteer, visit volunteermatch.org or idealist.org to find an opportunity in your community. You won’t regret it.

Featured photo credit: Volunte/All Hands Volunteers via flickr.com

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Last Updated on January 13, 2022

How to Use Travel Time Effectively

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How to Use Travel Time Effectively

Most of us associate travel and time with what we’re going to do one we get to our destination. Planning and mapping out what to do once you arrive can certainly make for a more pleasurable vacation, but there are things you can do while you are on your way that can make it even better.

Sure, you can plan for the things you’re going to do on your vacation while you are travelling en route – but what about making use of that time for other things that you don’t usually do when you’re at home? You don’t need to have your gadgets with you to do it, and you can really connect with yourself if you take the time to manage your life while heading towards your vacation destination.

Here are some great tips to help you with your time management while you travel, some of which are more conventional than others. Nonetheless, you can find out what works best for you and apply them accordingly depending on when and how you are travelling.

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1. Take Your Time Getting There

As I write this, I’m on a flight to San Francisco. Flying is the fastest way to get from place to place, and for many people it’s really the only way to travel.

But I’ve often taken the train or ferry on trips so that I have extra time without distraction to get more done. I’m not worrying about navigation or lack of space to do what I want to do. Instead I’m able to focus on getting stuff done during the time I’ve got without feeling rushed. For example, when I took the train from Vancouver to Portland, it was an eight hour trip and I managed to get a ton of writing done and closed a lot of open loops. It also was less expensive than flying, which was a bonus.

Sometimes taking the long way to get somewhere on vacation can be the best thing for you to get somewhere with your life.

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2. Go Gadget-Free

This is going to be a tough one for a lot of you. But why do you need to bring your gadgets with you when you go on vacation? It isn’t be a bad idea to leave all but one of them behind, and only pull out that one when you absolutely need to do so. In some countries, you’d be wise to be discreet with them anyway since flaunting them in front of those that are less fortunate than you isn’t a good practice. While it may not seem like flaunting to you, in different cultures it can definitely come across that way.

If you can’t go gadget-free, then at least go Internet-free. If you use a task management app that requires syncing across your multiple devices to be effective, remember that if you only have the one device with you then it can be the “master device” for the time being and will store your data locally anyway. Just sync up when you get home.

3. Reflect and Prepare

Finally, going on any sort of excursion gives you the perfect opportunity to reflect on where you’ve been. The fact you have removed yourself from where you usually are can give you a perspective that you simply can’t get when you’re at home. You may want to journal your thoughts during this time – and by taking more time to get to your destination you’ll have more time to dig deeper into it.

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After a period of reflection – however long that happens to be – you can then begin to not only prepare for the rest of your travels, you can prepare for the rest of what happens afterward. The reflection period is important, though. You need to really know where you’ve been in order to properly look at where you want to be. Time away from things gives you that chance.

Conclusion

Traveling isn’t always about where you’re going and how quickly you can get there. In fact, it’s rarely about that at all.

More often it’s where you’re at in your head that will dictate how much you benefit from traveling. So don’t just go somewhere fast. Instead, take your time on the way there and take the time to connect with not only where you are but who are while you’re there.

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If you do that, you’ll have a better chance to be who you want to be when you leave.

Featured photo credit: bruce mars via unsplash.com

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