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7 Questions Millennials Should Ask During Interviews

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7 Questions Millennials Should Ask During Interviews

Millennials, do you spend hours prepping for a job interview by researching companies, googling common interview questions and rehearsing answers? You may be missing one step! Don’t forget that an interview is not just about employers determining if you’re right for the company. Millennials should use this time to determine if the company is the right fit for them as well. Get past your nerves and work up the courage to ask your potential employer these questions: 

1. What are the opportunities for advancement?

One of the top reasons Millennials leave a company is because of lack of advancement opportunities, so it’s important to weed out any employers that will not offer this long-term growth. Millennials may be hesitant to ask this question so employers don’t get the impression that they are trying to get ahead before even getting a foot in the door. However, interviews are not just about finding a job, they are about finding the right fit for you, and if that means having opportunities for you to develop professionally, this question must be discussed.

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2. What is the job flexibility?

Millennials crave job flexibility, so why not find out how rigid the environment is before signing on for a job? This question does not have to come off as you having demands or wanting to sleep in late. Instead of saying “can I work a 10-6 shift? I’m not a morning person” try “What is the work-life balance like in this department?” The answer to this question will be more telling, as the potential employer will probably give you information about people in your department with families or activities outside of work that will help you determine the flexibility while still allowing you to make a strong first impression.

3. How much of an impact will I have?

To get a sense of where you stand on the totem pole, ask your potential employer questions about what kind of decision-making impact you will have. Will you be able to give ideas on solving department issues? Or will your biggest decision be what to have for lunch? Millennials love being responsible for important assignments and brainstorming solutions to company problems, so finding out ahead of time that this won’t be available to you will save you a lot of trouble working in the wrong job.

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4. What kind of interaction will I have with upper management?

Millennials do not want to work in an atmosphere where upper management is segregated from lower level employees. This generation wants to collaborate with team members on all levels, and get feedback and coaching from people they view as mentors. If you want to mix and mingle with the big wigs, but the position you’re interviewing for will have you trapped on another floor with similar employees, ask if there are mentorship opportunities available. Make sure you’re coming across as someone who wants to learn from the best, not someone who wants to be the best brown-noser.

5. What are the benefits?

Millennials may be more interested in short-term benefits like vacation time and the number of sick days, but during an interview, get an idea of long-term benefits as well. Find out what kind of retirement plans the company offers, and if health insurance covers dental and vision. As a Millennial, some of these benefits may not impact you soon, but you’ll be thankful you have them in the future.

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6. What reservations do you have about me?

This is a hard question for Millennials to ask in a situation that is already nerve-wracking, but it should be asked in every interview. Asking a potential employer this question shows you are a direct communicator and open to constructive criticism. Be sure to handle whatever answer comes your way in a professional manner. If they are hesitant about gaps in your resume, acknowledge that you understand why it is a concern, and then explain why it shouldn’t impact their hiring decision.

7. Who previously held this position?

Get a glimpse into the corporate environment by asking what happened to the person who came before you. If the person was promoted, this is a positive sign that the company believes in upward mobility, and that your position is a great starting point. Some employers may not openly tell you if the person who previously held the position was fired or left for another company, but always look for body language signs to signal that this could be the case. Fidgeting or nervousness in the response may be a red flag that the company does not treat employees well, or easily fires entry-level employees. 

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Trying to land a job so you can work your way up the corporate ladder? Take this free assessment by Joel Goldstein, President of Mr. Checkout Distributors to find out about your leadership strengths and weaknesses!

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