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Dizziness During Pregnancy: Causes And Prevention

Dizziness During Pregnancy: Causes And Prevention

There’s no doubt that pregnancy is a wonderful time in our lives. Feeling our little one’s kick for the very first time is up there with some of our best memories of all time.

But right from the start there are problems we need to be alerted to if we are to enjoy the next forty weeks.

Dizziness during pregnancy can be quite daunting, however, it can be helpful to know what causes it. It’s also of great value to know what we can do about it.

Lets start off with the causes.

Low Blood Sugar

When your system is low in sugar you can experience some nasty symptoms like weakness, dizziness, fast heart rate and excessive thirst.

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Dehydration

You’re not just eating for two now – your’e also drinking for two. The pregnant body can become dehydrated easily so watch out for that.

Progesterone Levels

Increased levels of progesterone encourages a greater amount of blood to flow to your baby however, this reduces blood flow to your brain and it lowers your blood pressure. This causes dizziness during pregnancy.

Circulatory System

The circulatory system is growing at such a rapid rate and the pregnant body isn’t producing enough blood to fill it. This results in a feeling of faintness.

Overheating

Spending too much time in a hot room, office or restaurant will cause the body to overheat, resulting in dizziness.

Low Blood Pressure

Your baby is growing to such an extent that it puts great pressure on your blood vessels. When you lie on your back the high levels of progesterone encourage your blood vessels to widen. This means extra blood is carried to your baby at a more rapid rate but not so much to you, reducing your blood pressure.

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So now you know why it happens, so what do you do if it happens to you.

How To Manage Pregnancy Dizziness and Fainting

Lie down on your side and elevate your legs until you feel OK again. If you’re not comfortable lying down, don’t worry, just sit up.

From that sitting position bend down and try to touch your feet. We don’t expect you to be able to touch your feet – just aim in that direction. As soon as you’re feeling a little better do the following three things.

  • Make sure your clothes aren’t a tight fit
  • Have a big glass of water and a snack
  • Take a little walk outside for five minutes

Don’t do any of the above until you are steady on your feet and free from all dizziness.

And finally you might be interested to learn how to avoid these dizzy spells in the first place. Wouldn’t it be nice if you never experienced any at all? Well these tips will definitely reduce the chances.

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Take Your Time

Don’t rush when you are getting up from a sitting or lying position. Easy does it – one step at a time. You don’t want your blood pressure dropping so take your time and that should help.

Eat Well

If you eat a balanced diet you will reduce the likelihood of fainting. You should make sure to get in all of the food groups (no faddy diets for the next 40 weeks).

And also eat often (6 smaller meals each day rather than 3 big ones) .This way you’re not giving your blood sugar a chance to drop. Always have a snack or two close by in case you start to feel a bit funny. I always found bananas to be good for getting my blood sugar back up quickly.

Fresh Air

Make sure to get outside and get fresh air as often as you can. Employers need to be understanding about this. It will be good for you to stretch your legs anyway.

Lie On Your Side

Lying on your back is a bad idea if you want to avoid feeling dizzy. The baby will press on your vena cava which will slow down your blood supply. Try to lie on your side where possible.

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Dress in Layers

This way you can shed whatever layers you need to so you can get the right body temperature.

Take Breaks From Standing

Avoid standing for too long. Standing for long periods of time is not recommended, therefore I would try to make sure there is a chair available at all times.

Drink Plenty

Drink at least eight glasses of water or juice each day. Don’t skimp on fluids for yourself and your little one.

Finally a word of caution. If your dizziness does get out of control and you faint, it is best to have your doctor check you out.

You will probably be fine but it’s the best thing to do.

Also don’t operate any machinery or drive if you feel at all faint.

Not everyone suffers with pregnancy dizziness but if you do just follow the guidelines above and you should be fine.

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Published on February 11, 2021

3 Positive Discipline Strategies That Are Best For Your Child

3 Positive Discipline Strategies That Are Best For Your Child

I’m old enough to remember how the cane at school was used for punishment. My dad is old enough to think that banning corporal punishment in schools resulted in today’s poorly disciplined youth. With all of this as my early experiences, there was a time when I would have been better assigned to write about how to negatively discipline your child.

What changed? Thankfully, my wife showed me different approaches for discipline that were very positive. Plus, I was open to learning.

What has not changed is that kids are full of problems with impulses and emotions that flip from sad to happy, then angry in a moment. Though we’re not that different as adults with stress, anxiety, lack of sleep, and stimulants such as sugar and caffeine in our diets.

Punishment as Discipline?

What this means is that we usually take the easy path when a child misbehaves and punish them. Punishment may solve an isolated problem, but it’s not really teaching the kids anything useful in the long term.

Probably it’s time for me to be clear about what I mean by punishment and discipline as these terms are often used interchangeably, but they are quite different.

Discipline VS. Punishment

Punishment is where we inflict pain or suffering on our child as a penalty. Discipline means to teach. They’re quite the opposite, but you’ll notice that teachers, parents, and coaches often confuse the two words.

So, as parents, we have to have clear goals to teach our kids. It’s a long-term plan—using strategies that will have the longest-lasting impact on our kids are the best use of our time and energy.

If you’re clear about what you want to achieve, then it becomes easier to find the best strategy. The better we are at responding when our kids misbehave or do not follow our guidance, the better the results are going to be.

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3 Positive Discipline Strategies for Your Child

Stay with me as I appreciate that a lot of people who read these blogs do not always have children with impulse control. We’ve had a lot of kids in our martial arts classes that were the complete opposite. They had concentration issues, hyperactive, and disruptive to the other children.

The easy solution is to punish their parents by removing the kids from the class or punish the child with penalties such as time outs and burpees. Yes, it was tempting to do all of this, but one of our club values is that we pull you up rather than push you down.

This means it’s a long-term gain to build trust and confidence, which is destroyed by constant punishments.

Here are the discipline strategies we used to build trust and confidence with these hyperactive kids.

1. Patience

The first positive discipline strategy is to simply be patient. The more patient you are, the more likely you are to get results. Remember I said that we need to build trust and connection. You’ll get further with this goal using patience.

As a coach, sometimes I was not the best person for this role, but we had other coaches in the club that could step in here. As a parent, you may not have this luxury, so it’s really important to recognize any improvements that you see and celebrate them.

2. Redirection

The second strategy we use is redirection. It’s important with a redirection to take “no” out of the equation. Choices are a great alternative.

Imagine a scenario where you’re in a restaurant and your kid is wailing. The hard part here is getting your child to stop screaming long enough for you to build a connection. Most parents have calming strategies and if you practice them with your child, they are more likely to be effective.

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In the first moment of calm, you can say “Your choice to scream and cry in public is not a good one. It would be best to say, Dad. What can I do to get ice-cream?” You can replace this with an appropriate option.

The challenge with being calm and redirecting is that we need to be clear-minded, focused, and really engaged at the moment. If you’re on your phone, talking with friends or family, thinking about work or the bills, you’ll miss this opportunity to discipline in a way that has long-term benefits.

3. Repair and Ground Rules

The third positive discipline strategy is to repair and use ground rules. Once you’ve given the better option and it has been taken, you have a chance to repair this behavior to lessen its occurrence to better yet, prevent it from happening again. And by setting appropriate ground rules, you can make this a long-term win by helping your child improve their behavior.

It’s these ground rules that help you correct the poor choices of your child and direct the behavior that you want to see.

Consequences Versus Ultimatums

When I was a child and being punished. My parents worked in a busy business for long hours, so their default was to go to ultimatums. “Do that again and you’re grounded for a week,” or “If I catch you doing X, you’ll go to bed without dinner”.

Looking back, this worked to a point. But the flip side is that I remembered more of the ultimatums than the happier times. I’ve learned through trial and error with my own kids that consequences are more effective while not breaking down trust.

What to Do When Ground Rules Get Broken?

It’s on the consequences that you use when the ground rules are broken.

In the martial arts class, when the hyperactive student breaks the ground rules. They would miss a turn in a game or go to the back of the line in a queue. We do not want to shame the child by isolating them. But on the flip side, there should be clear ground rules and proportionate consequences.

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Yes, there are times when we would like to exclude the student from the class, the club, and even the universe. Again, it’s here that patience is so important and probably impulse control too. With an attainable consequence, you can maintain trust and you’re more likely to get the long-term behavior that you’re looking to achieve.

Interestingly, we would occasionally hear a strategy from parents that little Kevin has been misbehaving at home with his sister or something similar. He likes martial arts training, so the parent would react by removing Kevin from the martial arts class as a punishment.

We would suggest that this would remove Kevin from an environment where he is behaving positively. Removing him from this is likely to be detrimental to the change you would like to see. He may even feel shame when he returns to the class and loses all the progress he’s made.

Alternatives to Punishment

Another option is to tell Kevin to write a letter to his sister, apologizing for his behavior, and explaining how he is going to behave in the future.

If your child is too young to write, give the apology face to face. For the apology to feel sincere, there is some value to pre-framing or practicing this between yourself and your child before they give it to the intended person.

Don’t expect them to know the ground rules or what you’re thinking! It will be clearer to your child and better received with some practice. You can practice along the lines of: “X is the behavior I did, Y is what I should have done, and Z is my promise to you for how I’m going to act in the future.” You can replace XYZ with the appropriate actions.

It does not need to be a letter or in person, it can even be a video. But there has to be an intention to repair the broken ground rule. If you try these strategies, that is become fully engaged with them and you’re still getting nowhere.

But what to do if these strategies do not work? Then there is plenty to gain by seeking the help of an expert. Chances are that something is interfering or limiting their development.

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This does not mean that your child has a neurological deficiency, although this may be the root cause. But it means that you can get an objective view and help on how to create the changes that you would like to see. Remember that using positive discipline strategies is better than mere punishment.

There are groups that you can chat with for help. Family Lives UK has the aim of ensuring that all parents have somewhere to turn before they reached a crisis point. The NSPCC also provides a useful guide to positive parenting that you can download.[1]

Bottom Line

So, there your go, the three takeaways on strategies you can use for positively disciplining your child. The first one is about you! Be patient, be present, and think about what is best for the long term. AKA, avoid ultimatums and punishment. The second is to use a redirect, then repair and repeat (ground rules) as your 3-step method of discipline.

Using these positive discipline strategies require you to be fully engaged with your child. Again, being impulsive breaks trust and you lose some of the gains you’ve both worked hard to achieve.

Lastly, consequences are better than punishment. Plus, avoid shaming, especially in public at all costs.

I hope this blog has been useful, and remember that you should be more focused on repairing bad behavior because being proactive and encouraging good behavior with rewards, fun, and positive emotions takes less effort than repairing the bad.

More Tips on How To Discipline Your Child

Featured photo credit: Leo Rivas via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] NSPCC Learning: Positive parenting

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